HomeGroupsTalkMoreZeitgeist
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Loading...

Roads to Quoz: An American Mosey (2008)

by William Least Heat-Moon

Other authors: See the other authors section.

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
3121060,688 (3.68)17
Heat-Moon writes travel books like no one else. Quirky, discursive, endlessly curious, he embarks on American journeys off the beaten path. Sticking to the small places via the small roads, he uncovers a nation deep in character, story, and charm. "Quoz" refers to anything strange, incongruous, or peculiar. Quoz can be history and heredity; stories, retold or invented; strange characters with poignant dreams. It's places with names like Sublimity City, Kentucky, and Dull Center, Wyoming; unresolved crimes, violent and rippling; schemers and inventors and those missing a tooth or two; and the mysterious Quapaw Ghost Light of Oklahoma. For the first time since his 1982 Blue Highways, Heat-Moon is back on the backroads with a lyrical, funny, and magisterially told chronicle of American passage, of maps of the heart and mind.--From publisher description.… (more)
None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 17 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 10 (next | show all)
AN excellent if overwritten book. LHM tried and succeeded in using a number of words I had never read before. Still a readable and interesting book uncovering new and interesting aspects of America. I really enjoyed the last section on the ICW. ( )
  JBreedlove | Oct 16, 2018 |
I found the prose pretentious and the quality uneven. I'll put it down now and maybe try again some other time. ( )
  BLBera | Jul 16, 2011 |
Excellent. Classic Heat Moon quoziness exploring the corners of the US that few others ever bother to report from. Few, if any, write with such a glint in their eye as he does. Each chapter is a new delight of oddity - full of colour, sounds, and smells. Most of the smells are great...

WLHM has a knack of writing about places in a way that makes me want to visit if not the exact same destinations, then at least an opolis in the right direction..just over there.. Great stuff. I don't know how long until his next book will be published but I hope it's not too long a wait. ( )
  Polaris- | Jan 24, 2011 |
William Least Heat Moon is best known for his travel journals Blue Highways and River Horse. This newest book, which came out in 2008, is sewn together from his notes from years of visits to various places in the United States. It lacks the coherence of the others, because it is not the narrative of a single purposeful, or even purposeless journey. Nevertheless it is an enjoyable read from the millennial era's answer to Charles Kuralt. It is perfect for inducing Spring fever.

Quoz is a made-up word which Heat Moon defines as: Anything, anywhere. living or otherwise, connecting a human to existence and bringing an individual into the cosmos and integrating one with the immemorial, thereby making each life belong to creation, and so preventing the divorce of one from the all which brought it into being.

Heat Moon is blowing smoke up out collective skirts with this fancy definition of his fancy word. Suffice it to say that he likes odd and interesting stuff, especially if it's old. He is able to tease a story out of each discovery.

If I have any criticism of Roads to Quoz beyond it's scattershot nature it would be Heat Moon's attempt to make much out of the letter Q. His wife is known in the book as Q, rather than her name, and he makes up more than a few words which start with that letter and showers the reader with them and other Q words more grounded in the English language. By the end of chapter one this rhetorical flurry settles down to a drizzle however and it didn't kill my enjoyment of the book.



Heat Moon and Q meet many interesting people in Arkansas, Northern Louisiana, Northeast Pennsylvania, the Florida Panhandle, New Hampshire and I've probably left out a few more places. oh yes, the intercoastal waterway starting in Baltimore and going all the way down to Florida. I think that the intercoastal could have made a book by itself if he had done it in River Horse and not as a passenger on a commercial vessel. Next time, maybe.

I'll Never Forget The Day I Read A Book!
  cbjorke | Sep 10, 2009 |
I thoroughly enjoyed this quoz of a book. ( )
  nmulvany | Feb 8, 2009 |
Showing 1-5 of 10 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review

» Add other authors (1 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Heat-Moon, William Leastprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Cross, RuthIndexersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Lindgren, LauraDesignersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Information from the Russian Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to your language.
Epigraph
By Way of Explanation

"Upon my honour," cried Lynmere, piqued, "the quoz of the present season are beyond what a man could have hoped to see!"
"Quoz! What's quoz, neqhew?"
"Why, it's a thing there's no explaining to you sort of gentlemen."

—Frances Burney,
Camilla,
1796
Dedication
Para Quintana
First words
As travelers age, we carry along ever more journeys, especially when we cross through a remembered terrain where we become wayfarers in time as well as space, where physical landscapes get infused with temporal ones.
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

Heat-Moon writes travel books like no one else. Quirky, discursive, endlessly curious, he embarks on American journeys off the beaten path. Sticking to the small places via the small roads, he uncovers a nation deep in character, story, and charm. "Quoz" refers to anything strange, incongruous, or peculiar. Quoz can be history and heredity; stories, retold or invented; strange characters with poignant dreams. It's places with names like Sublimity City, Kentucky, and Dull Center, Wyoming; unresolved crimes, violent and rippling; schemers and inventors and those missing a tooth or two; and the mysterious Quapaw Ghost Light of Oklahoma. For the first time since his 1982 Blue Highways, Heat-Moon is back on the backroads with a lyrical, funny, and magisterially told chronicle of American passage, of maps of the heart and mind.--From publisher description.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.68)
0.5 1
1
1.5
2 5
2.5
3 9
3.5 6
4 15
4.5 1
5 10

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 150,578,747 books! | Top bar: Always visible