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The Prince by Niccolò Machiavelli
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The Prince (1513)

by Niccolò Machiavelli

Other authors: See the other authors section.

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
14,650140136 (3.72)284
  1. 121
    Utopia by Thomas More (2below)
    2below: Each one is fascinating in its own right but I think reading both (or reading them concurrently, as I did) provides an interesting perspective on two seemingly opposed extremes.
  2. 41
    Maxims and Reflections by Francesco Guicciardini (timoroso)
    timoroso: Guicciardini, a friend and colleague of Machiavelli, wrote a book of maxims sometimes profound in themselves, other times interesting to compare to Machiavelli's opinions. The subject matter for both is essentially the same: how to act in a politically and ethically thoroughly unstable world.… (more)
  3. 53
    The Republic by Plato (caflores)
  4. 21
    On the Nature of War by Carl von Clausewitz (sirparsifal)
  5. 03
    The Enchantress of Florence by Salman Rushdie (Othemts)
  6. 115
    Alice's Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll (Ciruelo, Othemts)
    Ciruelo: Really. Both are classic studies in the workings of power.
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» See also 284 mentions

English (115)  Spanish (7)  French (5)  Dutch (3)  Finnish (2)  Danish (2)  Italian (2)  Portuguese (1)  Swedish (1)  German (1)  All languages (139)
Showing 1-5 of 115 (next | show all)
It would be absurd to "review" the most important book on politics ever written. Go read it if you haven't already. It is very funny too. ( )
  timoroso | Aug 29, 2016 |
(note: review is of the Oxford World's Classics edition, translated by Peter Bondanella and Mark Musa, with introduction and notes by Peter Bondanella)

This is one of those classics you hear a lot about and then discover contains more than what you might expect. I was surprised by the extensive discussion of the various kinds of principalities and how princes may come to power in each situation, as well as the examples of princes from antiquity and then-modern times. All of this set the stage for the part that I knew about, the part where Machiavelli discusses the best courses of action for princes to take to gain the affection of their followers, avoid flatterers, and so on.

The translation and the book were surprisingly readable, even with Machiavelli's penchant for long, flowing sentences. (The semicolon got quite a workout in this book.) The notes were at the end, which I prefer, because then the notes aren't scrunching up the main text. I am glad to have read this, but I probably wouldn't go out of my way to recommend reading it if you're not feeling the urge to do so. ( )
  rabbitprincess | Aug 3, 2016 |
Niccolo
  StPaulsChurch | Jul 19, 2016 |
Read all my reviews on http://urlphantomhive.booklikes.com

I'm probably not the best person to say something useful about this book, since I'm neither a historian nor very into politics, but as a reader, I still like to spread my thought about it. If you're looking for an in-depth analysis of the book, this review is not what you're looking for.

I decided to read The Prince quite impulsively after I started reading a somewhat weird manga adaptation of it (review to come), and I didn't understand a single thing of it. So, I decided I needed more background info, namely the original work. And in understanding the other book it certainly helped.

And it was quite a nice book to read. I'd expected it to be tougher to read, but I actually recognized many of the examples that were given in the book (who says playing games like Assassin's Creed doesn't teach you stuff?). That was interesting to read, and many of his political insights seemed legit although his advices - at least sometimes - seemed quite unethical. ( )
  Floratina | May 26, 2016 |
Read all my reviews on http://urlphantomhive.booklikes.com

This one was really weird. So weird in fact that I stopped after a chapter to first read the original version this book was based on. (You can find my review for Machiavelli's The Prince here )

After reading the original I came back to this story and although I understood it better now, it still wasn't working for me. Let me explain. The book is basically two parts mixed together. The first part is an English translation of the original book, not unlike the Gutenborg version I read. This story is then intertwined with comics that explain what's being told in the previous chapter as well as some information to understand the historical/political setting of 15th century Europe better.

If I recall correctly this book was first published in Korea, and I think it would work better there as an introduction into European history/politics. What I know of 'modern takes' from Asia on the Western History (aka Hetalia) was indeed not unlike this book. But it's not something I'm accustomed to, so it wasn't really working for me. There were some strange anachronisms and a recurring cat dressed in renaissance clothing. The drawings looked a bit simple to me.

I'd expected something more like the Manga Classics I've been reading last year, but it was nothing like that. They stay very close to the original story, and although this book actually has the original text in it, it feels much like it diverges a lot more. This certainly was a weird and unusual read.

Thanks to the publisher and Netgalley for providing me with a free copy of this book in exchange for an honest review! ( )
  Floratina | May 26, 2016 |
Showing 1-5 of 115 (next | show all)
Kad je reč o umešnosti vladanja, ovo nezaobilazno delo bilo je i ostalo neprevaziđeno. Postalo je pojam!

Delo nastalo na velikom raskršću istorije, kada se odlučno odbacuje srednjovekovno metafizičko učenje i usvajaju empirički metodi razmišljanja, predstavlja ujedno fascinantno svedočanstvo razlaza između mita i realnosti, između vere i sumnje. Ovaj biser renesansne političke misli karakteriše realistično posmatranje političkih događaja i visoke moralne pobude koje su inspirisale autora. Vladalac je samo prividno apoteoza tiranina i kodeks pravila za ubijanje, čitav traktat o vladaocu svodi se na to da se u Italiji pronađe čovek koji će je ujediniti. Život i delo ovog poznatog firentinca obeležavaju kao teoretičara o osnivanju i održavanju država.
added by Sensei-CRS | editknjigainfo.com
 

» Add other authors (108 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Machiavelli, Niccolòprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Aron, RaymondForewordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Bondanella, PeterTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Bull, George AnthonyTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Constantine, PeterTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Cullen, PatrickNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Decaro, EnzoNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Donno, Daniel JohnTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Ennis, MichaelForewordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Freccero, Johnsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Freyer, HansIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Gauss, ChristianIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Gohory, JacquesTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Grunberg, ArnonAfterwordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Inglese, GiorgioEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Mansfield, Harvey C.Introductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Mansfield, Harvey C.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Marriott, W. K.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Merian-Genast, ErnstTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Musa, MarkTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Otten, J.F.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Rieu, E. V.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Skinner, QuentinEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Thomson, Ninian HillTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
TitianCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Van Dooren, FransTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed

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Epigraph
Dedication
Niccolo Machiavelli to Lorenzo the Magnificent, Son of Piero di Medici
First words
All the states, all the dominions under whose authority men have lived in the past and live now have been and are either republics or principalities.
It is customary for those who wish to gain the favour of a prince to endeavour to do so by offering him gifts of those things which they hold most precious, or in which they know him to take especial delight.
Quotations
He who blinded by ambition, raises himself to a position whence he cannot mount higher, must thereafter fall with the greatest loss.
If an injury has to be done to a man it should be so severe that his vengeance need not be feared.
War cannot be avoided; it can only be postponed to the other's advantage.
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
This is the main work for The Prince. It should not be combined with any abridgement, adaptation, study guide, etc.
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Amazon.com Amazon.com Review (ISBN 0553212788, Mass Market Paperback)

When Lorenzo de' Medici seized control of the Florentine Republic in 1512, he summarily fired the Secretary to the Second Chancery of the Signoria and set in motion a fundamental change in the way we think about politics. The person who held the aforementioned office with the tongue-twisting title was none other than Niccolò Machiavelli, who, suddenly finding himself out of a job after 14 years of patriotic service, followed the career trajectory of many modern politicians into punditry. Unable to become an on-air political analyst for a television network, he only wrote a book. But what a book The Prince is. Its essential contribution to modern political thought lies in Machiavelli's assertion of the then revolutionary idea that theological and moral imperatives have no place in the political arena. "It must be understood," Machiavelli avers, "that a prince ... cannot observe all of those virtues for which men are reputed good, because it is often necessary to act against mercy, against faith, against humanity, against frankness, against religion, in order to preserve the state." With just a little imagination, readers can discern parallels between a 16th-century principality and a 20th-century presidency. --Tim Hogan

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:12:30 -0400)

(see all 9 descriptions)

Dinin politika erindeki etkisi, dsmanlarla batmenin yollar ve ittifaklarn genilirli konusunda gretici bilgileri konu alan yapt.

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