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The Prince by Niccolo Machiavelli
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The Prince (original 1513; edition 2009)

by Niccolo Machiavelli, Colin J.E. Lupton (Editor), W. K. Marriott (Translator)

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14,900153131 (3.72)295
Member:JYabuki
Title:The Prince
Authors:Niccolo Machiavelli
Other authors:Colin J.E. Lupton (Editor), W. K. Marriott (Translator)
Info:Prohyptikon Publishing Inc. (2009), Paperback, 108 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:***1/2
Tags:None

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The Prince by Niccolò Machiavelli (1513)

  1. 121
    Utopia by Thomas More (2below)
    2below: Each one is fascinating in its own right but I think reading both (or reading them concurrently, as I did) provides an interesting perspective on two seemingly opposed extremes.
  2. 41
    Maxims and Reflections by Francesco Guicciardini (timoroso)
    timoroso: Guicciardini, a friend and colleague of Machiavelli, wrote a book of maxims sometimes profound in themselves, other times interesting to compare to Machiavelli's opinions. The subject matter for both is essentially the same: how to act in a politically and ethically thoroughly unstable world.… (more)
  3. 53
    The Republic by Plato (caflores)
  4. 21
    On the Nature of War by Carl von Clausewitz (sirparsifal)
  5. 03
    The Enchantress of Florence by Salman Rushdie (Othemts)
  6. 115
    Alice's Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll (Ciruelo, Othemts)
    Ciruelo: Really. Both are classic studies in the workings of power.
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» See also 295 mentions

English (121)  Spanish (7)  French (5)  Dutch (4)  Finnish (2)  Danish (2)  Italian (2)  Portuguese (1)  Swedish (1)  German (1)  All (146)
Showing 1-5 of 121 (next | show all)
Political machinations in Medieval Tuscany ( )
  JackSweeney | Jan 10, 2017 |
The Prince. Niccolo Machiavelli. 2008. Our book club chose this classic of how to get and keep political power because it was an election year. What surprised several of us was how mild it seemed. We decided we were no longer idealistic and had lived too long to be shocked at what lengths a man in power will go to maintain that power ( )
  judithrs | Dec 28, 2016 |
[From “Behind the Story”, Wings, June 1946; reprinted in A Traveller in Romance, ed. John Whitehead, Clarkson N. Potter, 1984, pp. 135-6:]

It is certainly fifty years ago since I first became acquainted with the main writings of Machiavelli. I found them very good reading and I found myself besides intensely interested in the character of the man who wrote them. […] For Machiavelli was no ordinary man. He had no patience with humbug. He was no hypocrite. He was completely devoid of sentimentality and he had a cool sense of reality. The Prince, his most famous work, is an analysis how an ambitious man may make himself ruler of a state. Machiavelli with his acute intelligence saw what means such a man must employ to achieve his ends and indicated them with an admirable clarity and with a characteristic lack of moral scruple. He thus produced a very excellent handbook for dictators. Napoleon studied it and we are told that Mussolini and Hitler profited by its teaching. In passing, however, I may suggest that if Hitler had read it more attentively he would have saved himself from making some fatal mistakes.

[…]

[Machiavelli] was a great letter writer and many of his letters have been preserved. I discovered from reading them that he, like all of us, was not all of a piece. He was not only an industrious civil servant and an astute diplomat. He was a jovial fellow, who loved to tell a good story and who liked good living and pretty women. I discovered also that he was an ardent patriot. Thus have I tried to represent him.*

______________________________________
*See Then and Now (1946). Ed.
  WSMaugham | Dec 10, 2016 |
A surprisingly funny book, The Prince is, in layman's terms, the dummy's guide to keeping power. Interestingly enough, the book transcends just this concept, with often disturbingly cold practicality that sets down a fascinatingly pragmatic formula for political fortune. Even if one doesn't harbor any political prowess, this is still a fast and captivating read, giving light to the autocratic rule of the time that was capable of strongly uniting its subjects. I HIGHLY RECOMMEND READING THIS BOOK! ( )
  dbhatia | Nov 9, 2016 |
It's easy to be a cynic about this book, but there is some very good psychological advice here. Such as, after a victory, make friends with your enemies, and you'll be able to trust them more than your allies, who now that you have won, will be looking to take advantage of you or overthrow you. Your enemies, on the other hand, will be grateful for your mercy. ( )
1 vote datrappert | Oct 18, 2016 |
Showing 1-5 of 121 (next | show all)
Kad je reč o umešnosti vladanja, ovo nezaobilazno delo bilo je i ostalo neprevaziđeno. Postalo je pojam!

Delo nastalo na velikom raskršću istorije, kada se odlučno odbacuje srednjovekovno metafizičko učenje i usvajaju empirički metodi razmišljanja, predstavlja ujedno fascinantno svedočanstvo razlaza između mita i realnosti, između vere i sumnje. Ovaj biser renesansne političke misli karakteriše realistično posmatranje političkih događaja i visoke moralne pobude koje su inspirisale autora. Vladalac je samo prividno apoteoza tiranina i kodeks pravila za ubijanje, čitav traktat o vladaocu svodi se na to da se u Italiji pronađe čovek koji će je ujediniti. Život i delo ovog poznatog firentinca obeležavaju kao teoretičara o osnivanju i održavanju država.
added by Sensei-CRS | editknjigainfo.com
 

» Add other authors (314 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Machiavelli, Niccolòprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Aron, RaymondForewordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Bondanella, PeterTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Bull, George AnthonyTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Constantine, PeterTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Cullen, PatrickNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Decaro, EnzoNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Donno, Daniel JohnTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Ennis, MichaelForewordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Freccero, Johnsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Freyer, HansIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Gauss, ChristianIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Gohory, JacquesTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Grunberg, ArnonAfterwordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Inglese, GiorgioEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Kekewich, Lucille MargaretIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Mansfield, Harvey C.Introductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Mansfield, Harvey C.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Marriott, W. K.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Merian-Genast, ErnstTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Musa, MarkTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Otten, J.F.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Rieu, E. V.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Skinner, QuentinEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Thomson, Ninian HillTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
TitianCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Van Dooren, FransTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed

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Epigraph
Dedication
Niccolo Machiavelli to Lorenzo the Magnificent, Son of Piero di Medici
First words
All the states, all the dominions under whose authority men have lived in the past and live now have been and are either republics or principalities.
It is customary for those who wish to gain the favour of a prince to endeavour to do so by offering him gifts of those things which they hold most precious, or in which they know him to take especial delight.
Quotations
He who blinded by ambition, raises himself to a position whence he cannot mount higher, must thereafter fall with the greatest loss.
If an injury has to be done to a man it should be so severe that his vengeance need not be feared.
War cannot be avoided; it can only be postponed to the other's advantage.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
This is the main work for The Prince. It should not be combined with any abridgement, adaptation, study guide, etc.
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Amazon.com Amazon.com Review (ISBN 0553212788, Mass Market Paperback)

When Lorenzo de' Medici seized control of the Florentine Republic in 1512, he summarily fired the Secretary to the Second Chancery of the Signoria and set in motion a fundamental change in the way we think about politics. The person who held the aforementioned office with the tongue-twisting title was none other than Niccolò Machiavelli, who, suddenly finding himself out of a job after 14 years of patriotic service, followed the career trajectory of many modern politicians into punditry. Unable to become an on-air political analyst for a television network, he only wrote a book. But what a book The Prince is. Its essential contribution to modern political thought lies in Machiavelli's assertion of the then revolutionary idea that theological and moral imperatives have no place in the political arena. "It must be understood," Machiavelli avers, "that a prince ... cannot observe all of those virtues for which men are reputed good, because it is often necessary to act against mercy, against faith, against humanity, against frankness, against religion, in order to preserve the state." With just a little imagination, readers can discern parallels between a 16th-century principality and a 20th-century presidency. --Tim Hogan

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:12:30 -0400)

(see all 9 descriptions)

Dinin politika erindeki etkisi, dsmanlarla batmenin yollar ve ittifaklarn genilirli konusunda gretici bilgileri konu alan yapt.

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» see all 32 descriptions

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