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Maus: A Survivor's Tale by Art Spiegelman

Maus: A Survivor's Tale

by Art Spiegelman

Other authors: See the other authors section.

Series: Maus: A Survivor's Tale (omnibus)

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4,1721301,200 (4.54)1 / 233

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English (114)  French (6)  German (2)  Catalan (2)  Spanish (2)  Dutch (2)  Swedish (1)  Danish (1)  All languages (130)
Showing 1-5 of 114 (next | show all)
Art Spiegelman is so sincere and honest as to inspire admiration for his courage to show his feelings, and to write about the ways each participant of this tragedy tries to overcome its legacy. This comic-book made me feel ashamed of myself as a human being. Every one should read it, lest one forgets. It's a burden on one's soul, but a very needed one. ( )
  sturmer | Oct 25, 2015 |
Three letters: W-O-W. I was truly amazed by this book and fully understand the Pulitzer the author received for it.

The format is brilliant: the book you're holding and reading is actually being developed and written in front of your eyes. The constant switch between present day and war memories force you to take the cruelty of it all in more wholly.

The content is brilliant too: there are two narratives to follow: the present day Spiegelman and the past Spiegelman. Perhaps I found the relationship between the author and this father even more appalling than the war story.

In short, this is a truly amazing book and I loved and hated it beginning to end. For days I had an awkward feeling in my chest and I'm still struggling ordering my thoughts on it.

What an impact a book can have on your life... ( )
  bbbart | May 30, 2015 |
When I read this book in 8th grade, I was mystified. It's not hard to get me into historical novels, but historical graphic novels? I was practically drooling when I got my hands on it. The art was amazing, and the story was better. For me personally, it is The Diary of Anne Frank of graphic novels. ( )
  Wabbajack | Oct 23, 2014 |
The real horror of the Auschwitz concentration camps and the nazi rule captured in a heart rending manner. ( )
  aeromaxtran | Sep 17, 2014 |
I really like the way this book is narrated, it tell the story of one of the survivors from the holocaust. It also shows his relation with his son and the problems that they have through the years, and how the creation of this book put them closer. The narrative is very well done and he manage to show us a terrible episode of humanity. After you finish reading you understand why it won the Pulitzer prize. ( )
  CaroPi | Jun 22, 2014 |
Showing 1-5 of 114 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors (20 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Art Spiegelmanprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Soares, Antonio de MacedoTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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"The Jews are undoubtedly a race, but they are not human." Adolf Hitler
For Anja
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Last one to the schoolyard is a rotten egg.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0679406417, Hardcover)

On the occasion of the twenty-fifth anniversary of its first publication, here is the definitive edition of the book acclaimed as “the most affecting and successful narrative ever done about the Holocaust” (Wall Street Journal) and “the first masterpiece in comic book history” (The New Yorker).

The Pulitzer Prize-winning Maus tells the story of Vladek Spiegelman, a Jewish survivor of Hitler’s Europe, and his son, a cartoonist coming to terms with his father’s story. Maus approaches the unspeakable through the diminutive. Its form, the cartoon (the Nazis are cats, the Jews mice), shocks us out of any lingering sense of familiarity and succeeds in “drawing us closer to the bleak heart of the Holocaust” (The New York Times).

Maus is a haunting tale within a tale. Vladek’s harrowing story of survival is woven into the author’s account of his tortured relationship with his aging father. Against the backdrop of guilt brought by survival, they stage a normal life of small arguments and unhappy visits. This astonishing retelling of our century’s grisliest news is a story of survival, not only of Vladek but of the children who survive even the survivors. Maus studies the bloody pawprints of history and tracks its meaning for all of us.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:21:18 -0400)

(see all 4 descriptions)

This book memorializes Spiegelman's father's experience of the Holocaust - it follows his story, frame by frame, from youth and marriage in pre-war Poland to imprisonment in Auschwitz. The 'survivor's tale' that results is stark and unembellished.

» see all 3 descriptions

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Penguin Australia

An edition of this book was published by Penguin Australia.

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