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Agincourt 1415: Triumph Against the Odds by…
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Agincourt 1415: Triumph Against the Odds

by Matthew Bennett

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The current redesigned cover on LibraryThing has been given a more professional look. My copy has the charming cut-and-paste feeling of the earliest Osprey campaign booklets. Nevertheless, this title has all the features of a good Osprey title. Lavish illustrations, good maps and a comprehensible text with a good analysis of the players, the strategy and tactics. I especially liked the illustrated English and French heraldic shields. ( )
  jcbrunner | Oct 27, 2007 |
This highly practical account of Agincourt includes information on the campaign, the array, and the battle. There are strong color plates, some heraldic information, and great maps of the Agincourt battlefield. Matthew Bennett is a first rate historian on medieval warfare. ( )
  ksmyth | Oct 15, 2005 |
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0275988384, Hardcover)

Agincourt is one of the most evocative names in English military history. Remembered as a fifteenth-century Dunkirk, the battle is part of the great English tradition of victory in the face of vastly superior forces. The French army, according to chroniclers, was between three to six times as large as that of the English and composed the flower of France's chivalry. Henry V's forces were numerically weakened by their earlier siege-action at Harfleur, and had become increasingly tired, hungry, and ill as they journeyed through enemy territory on their way to the safe port of Calais. The appearance of large French forces blocking their way seemed to signal the end of Henry V's brief attempt at the crown of France. However, the English had several advantages over their enemies. Not only was their command structure far more coherent than that of the French, but also their forces had far greater tactical flexibility. English success in arms was based on the extremely effective combination of heavily armoured men-at-arms with troops armed with the long-range, quick-firing longbow. The havoc that this weapon wreaked on the French forces before they were close enough to engage with the English knights was crucial for the English victory, as was the disorganisation of the French forces and the unforeseen problems in their pre-prepared battle plan. Matthew Bennett examines the Agincourt campaign from the siege of Harfleur to the aftermath of the battle at Agincourt itself. Ably using original fifteenth century evidence, including the surviving French battle plan and the accounts of men present in both armies, Bennett discusses the lead-up to the battle, the tactical dispositions of the two forcesand the reasons for the ultimate English success. What results is a full and extremely interesting account of one of the most important campaigns of the Hundred Years' War.

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:26:16 -0400)

Agincourt is one of the most evocative names in English military history. Henry V's forces were tired, hungry, and faced a French army three to six times more numerous. However, they possessed several advantages, and English success resulted from the combination of heavily armoured men-at-arms and troops armed with the infamous longbow - the havoc this weapon wreaked was crucial. Using original fifteenth century evidence, including the surviving French battle plan and the accounts of men present in both armies, this title discusses the lead-up to the battle, the tactical dispositions of the two forces and the reasons for the ultimate English success. ... [Back cover]… (more)

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