HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Eight Men Out: The Black Sox and the 1919…
Loading...

Eight Men Out: The Black Sox and the 1919 World Series (1963)

by Eliot Asinof

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
4451123,513 (4.02)17

None.

Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 17 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 11 (next | show all)
Pretty solid read about the infamous Black Sox scandal of 1919. As others have pointed out, though, it's not sourced, and I seem to recall reading somewhere that Asinof later admitted that he fabricated many (if not all) of the conversations found throughout the book for dramatic effect, since the survivors wouldn't talk to him. So the information is fine - I'm pretty sure that there hasn't been anything since that has refuted this book - but take the convos with a grain of salt. Anyway, one definitely has to feel for the White Sox players after reading this - they were shafted by their owner and the fix itself ended up being botched. Maybe not quite the masterpiece that I've seen it described as, but definitely worth a read if you have any interest in this era of baseball. ( )
  asktheages | Sep 22, 2012 |
One of the classic baseball books... great research and detail... written in the early 60's, still stands! ( )
  BooksForDinner | Oct 3, 2011 |
The story of the 1919 White Sox and the throwing of the World Series, this book might seem like a weird choice for me, considering I know little and care less about baseball. But I do know and love Chicago, and I am slowly building up a collection of books about my city, and this seemed like a good addition.

The book tells the story well. It digs in, gets facts that were hidden for years, and presents everything in an orderly fashion. It even explained how the baseball parts worked to me, a consummate non-baseballer. What I didn't anticipate, however, was how sad this book would make me. Based on th information available, not a single person who most deserved punishment received it. The baseball players themselves were treated poorly from all sides, and I had no idea how incompetent they were at the whole fix itself. They barely received any money! And given how shittily Comiskey treated them as players, it isn't surprising that they turned on him. He bullied them into contracts they didn't want to sign, and even took advantage of some players' illiteracy. It's just, ugh, you wonder how the players could ever have been so trusting, and you have to remember it was a completely different era and almost a century ago now, but it still just boggles the (modern) mind.

Asinaf should also get a special mention for being quite talented at evoking the mood of the time. I found myself using "on the square" in my internal monologue during the time when I was reading this book, so apparently I'd really gotten into the mindset of an early 20th-century-gambler. Hilariously.

This is definitely a good read if you are interested in baseball or oppressive business tactics or just an interesting bit of American history. ( )
  g33kgrrl | Sep 2, 2010 |
This book is the most thoroughly researched book on sports I have ever read. But thanks to the writing skills of Eliot Asinof, it reads more like a fast-paced thriller than like a non-fiction account. Ultimately, this book is as much about America in that era as it is about baseball. It's also easily the best thing to come out of the 1919 Black Sox scandal. ( )
  rohwyn | Jun 16, 2009 |
Eliot Asinof was kind enough to read a book I wrote, (and he liked it)...my god, I think it was way back in 1969 when he was teaching night school at NYU, and I was driving a cab. The title of my book was "P.N. 7". Hey, Eliot, if you're out there and you still have a copy of my book (unlikely) send me a message here on LT. I lived a pretty "exciting" life back in those days, and my copy of PN7 was last seen in the police station in Elkton, Md., where my friend Ben was being thrown in jail for running a toll booth off the Delaware Memorial bridge. The deputy who read PN7 told me it was a work of art.
Anyway, getting back to your book, I really enjoyed it. And I'm not just saying that in hopes of getting my manuscript back. For those who don't know, Eight Men Out is about the Chicago White Sox throwing the World Series back in 1919. They made it into a movie, but as usual, the book is much better than the film. If you like baseball, you'll like this book. These weren't bad guys: not like the guys shooting up steroids today. Eliot explains the financial pressures these players were under in a system that didn't allow them to change teams without the owner's permission. And they didn't have arbitration in those days. Guys who should have been making big bucks were playing for scraps, and they had no way out. ( )
  IronMike | Feb 24, 2009 |
Showing 1-5 of 11 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (2)

Book description
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0805065377, Paperback)

The headlines proclaimed the 1919 fix of the World Series and attempted cover-up as "the most gigantic sporting swindle in the history of America!" First published in 1963, Eight Men Out has become a timeless classic. Eliot Asinof has reconstructed the entire scene-by-scene story of the fantastic scandal in which eight Chicago White Sox players arranged with the nation's leading gamblers to throw the Series in Cincinnati. Mr. Asinof vividly describes the tense meetings, the hitches in the conniving, the actual plays in which the Series was thrown, the Grand Jury indictment, and the famous 1921 trial. Moving behind the scenes, he perceptively examines the motives and backgrounds of the players and the conditions that made the improbable fix all too possible. Here, too, is a graphic picture of the American underworld that managed the fix, the deeply shocked newspapermen who uncovered the story, and the war-exhausted nation that turned with relief and pride to the Series, only to be rocked by the scandal. Far more than a superbly told baseball story, this is a compelling slice of American history in the aftermath of World War I and at the cusp of the Roaring Twenties.

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 14:01:26 -0400)

(see all 3 descriptions)

The headlines proclaimed the 1919 fix of the World Series and attempted cover-up as "the most gigantic sporting swindle in the history of America!" First published in 1963, Eight Men Out has become a timeless classic. Eliot Asinof has reconstructed the entire scene-by-scene story of the fantastic scandal in which eight Chicago White Sox players arranged with the nation's leading gamblers to throw the Series in Cincinnati. Mr. Asinof vividly describes the tense meetings, the hitches in the conniving, the actual plays in which the Series was thrown, the Grand Jury indictment, and the famous 1921 trial. Moving behind the scenes, he perceptively examines the motives and backgrounds of the players and the conditions that made the improbable fix all too possible. Here, too, is a graphic picture of the American underworld that managed the fix, the deeply shocked newspapermen who uncovered the story, and the war-exhausted nation that turned with relief and pride to the Series, only to be rocked by the scandal. Far more than a superbly told baseball story, this is a compelling slice of American history in the aftermath of World War I and at the cusp of the Roaring Twenties.… (more)

» see all 2 descriptions

Quick Links

Swap Ebooks Audio
2 avail.
15 wanted
2 pay

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (4.02)
0.5
1
1.5
2 2
2.5 2
3 13
3.5 3
4 41
4.5 8
5 19

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

Help/FAQs | About | Privacy/Terms | Blog | Contact | LibraryThing.com | APIs | WikiThing | Common Knowledge | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | 92,780,381 books! | Top bar: Always visible