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The Amateur's mind : turning chess…
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The Amateur's mind : turning chess misconceptions into chess mastery (edition 1999)

by Jeremy Silman

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347845,595 (3.82)5
Member:IcarusFalls
Title:The Amateur's mind : turning chess misconceptions into chess mastery
Authors:Jeremy Silman
Info:Los Angeles : Siles Press, c1999.
Collections:Your library
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The Amateur's Mind: Turning Chess Misconceptions into Chess Mastery by Jeremy Silman

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Excellent for club level players intent on improving and willing to study. I think it helps with the challenge of how to find a good plan. ( )
  Michael_Lilly | Feb 6, 2015 |
IM Jeremy Silman is a fine instructor, author of numerous popular books on chess, and an engaging writer. His technique in this book is to take games from tournament play and give them, move by move, to his students, asking them for their evaluations and observations along with planned moves and ideas for progress. It is refreshing and interesting reading for students of chess. I would place this instruction at the mid to strong club player level. I agree that this book should be included in any list of contemporary chess instruction literature of interest to mid-level players. ( )
1 vote mldavis2 | Sep 27, 2013 |
I'm divided on this book. One the one hand, it's the best and most readable book I've read that details exactly where the regular chess player's thought processes go wrong. I'm sure it's helped my play very much. On the other hand, Silman can be brutal when criticizing his students' play. ( )
  jpers36 | Oct 14, 2009 |
Some people find Silman's style condescending because he primarily uses lower ranked players games to illustrate points, but I find that this makes the lessons more accessible. Watching Grandmasters slug it out can be instructive, but the simpler, linear approach of Silman's students, with his line by line dialog, make this book a great lesson on chess theories and changed the way I think about the game... ( )
  luketest4 | Jul 31, 2009 |
Some people find Silman's style condescending because he primarily uses lower ranked players games to illustrate points, but I find that this makes the lessons more accessible. Watching Grandmasters slug it out can be instructive, but the simpler, linear approach of Silman's students, with his line by line dialog, make this book a great lesson on chess theories and changed the way I think about the game... ( )
  yak_lukestwin | Jul 29, 2009 |
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