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The Warded Man by Peter V. Brett
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The Warded Man

by Peter V. Brett

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English (123)  French (2)  German (1)  Portuguese (Portugal) (1)  All languages (127)
Showing 1-5 of 123 (next | show all)
Great book can't wait for the next ( )
  Gonzalo8046 | Sep 29, 2014 |
A surprisingly good book. Somehow, the author managed to stretch the story on and on without the action slowing down or seeming pointless. I'll probably read more from this author. ( )
  piersanti | Sep 28, 2014 |
Okay, so I'm writing this review a little under three months after I actually finished reading it. But looking over my status updates, I can easily remember what I was going to say...

Basically, The Warded Man is a dark, unflinching tale of the human race--not only at the mercy of the demons they fear--but of their own dark natures. It's pretty simple. Basically, each night, demons come up from the Core, which is the equivalent of Hell. Humans once had a way to kill them using wards drawn onto weapons, but this magic was lost to them, leaving them only with meager defenses. So basically, being able to draw wards was extremely important, because it was the only thing to help keep you from getting killed. In the story, people don't travel because of the demons, leaving cities and villages feeling isolated.

We meet our three protagonists, Arlen, Leesha, and Rojer, as children.

Arlen, from a young age, displayed great courage, and grew to hate cowardice after he saw his father allow his mother to die at the hands of demons. Running away, he sought the life of a Messenger--one of the only professions that allowed a man to travel freely between the cities, carrying messages. Leesha was an ordinary girl looking to take up her father's trade of paper making. She was engaged to a big brute of a boy, but after a demon attack on her village, she found herself on the path to becoming a Healer. Rojer lost his family to a demon attack, and was raised by a Jongleur. Though lacking three fingers, he too, sought to be a Jongleur. Each have a vital skill that is later used to fight back the demons, using magic that had once been long lost.

A great deal of the book sees these stories unfolding independent of each other. It isn't until adulthood that these three characters all come together, and not before many trials. If you look at my status updates, I was rather frustrated with the beginning, because a great deal of time was devoted to dysfunctional backwater hickery involving abuse, rape, and gossip. Thankfully, the story moves away from that, and becomes so much more towards the end.

The action is great and unflinching. Unlike some authors who are afraid to bring any permanent harm to their protagonists, Peter Brett is merciless, and you really get a sense of suspense as you read the dangerous twists and turns. The writing is superb in that Brett does an excellent job painting out the characters in such complex detail.

My only issue was the setting. It isn't that it didn't work. It worked fine as a world. It's more a matter of personal preference, I suppose, when I say that I have no interest in country bumpkin drama...and in this story? There's plenty of it. Plus, the views held by the society at large was just too frustrating for me. Too much ass-covering, chauvinism, and cruelty. I realize this is a dark fantasy, but I've read dark fantasy before, and never has auxiliary characters made me want to kill someone as much as this book has. Keep me on the edge of my seat. Don't make me want to throw the book out the window! It's a fine line, but you have to walk it.

So, in summary...if you're into unforgiving settings and monstrous creatures, great suspense and possibly even horror...if you're into the drama you might see on Law and Order: SVU, or the redneck shenanigans of COPS...then maybe this book is for you. Again, the writing is superb, and the characters really grow on you. Personally, for me, this book was a love/hate relationship, so don't let that stop you from giving it a try! Who knows? You may just love it. ( )
  Illise_Montoya | Sep 28, 2014 |
This was the first novel I read by this author and I can say that it lives up to the all the good reviews I read prior to reading this. It tells the story of a world besieged by demons who kill any human not protected by wards each night. Well written with good character detail and world building. Looking forward to the sequels already available in this series.

4.5 stars and can recommend to anyone who enjoys dark fantasy with plenty of action. ( )
  ConalO | Sep 21, 2014 |
I don't know how this book was rated so highly, maybe people see something that I'm not reading. But I thoroughly disliked this book. I read 250 pages into the book, skimmed through the second half, and then decided it was worth any more of my time.

It has potential, yes. The concept of demons at night and wards to stop the carnage is fascinating. Not new, but still lots of potential. The rise of humanity against an oppressor. Also not new, but there is a lot you can do with it. So none of my problems were with the premise. I just could not freaking stand the characters!
They were all just so stupid, so unrealistic. I hated everyone. I don't think there was a single character that I liked.

The parents and adults were always worthless. Cowards or bitter liars and hypocrites. The main protagonists were always so self righteously obnoxious in how right they were. Arlen kept calling his dad a coward. And while, yeah, it's true, it was so fake. Arlen has been with his dad since he was little. And then all of a sudden he comes to the realization that his dad is a coward for doing the same things he's always done. What? There was no change that made Arlen realize those points. Nothing to imply that Arlen would not agree at least a little with his parents's opinions. It was all just too clear cut. Arlen was right. His dad is a coward. Everyone is a coward for not fighting back. Arghhh are you serious?! I hate one dimensional characters. There was absolutely no sympathy for the father. And when the main character is always "right", I feel like its a cop- out. Nobody can be always right. And it makes for an annoyingly perfect character.

Same with that girl Leesha. Her mom is a crazy whore and hypocrite that hates her. Her father is a wimp. Leesha is always in the right. Boring. And what is this characterization of female characters? Is every girl a whore or something? And does sexuality define every girl? Apparently so in this book.

And where is the freaking plot? I kept looking for it, but there was just so much character background I just stopped caring.
I wanted to learn about wards or clever plots. Not about how these characters were always right against other stupid villagers.

One star. I can't even finish this book. ( )
  NineLarks | Sep 15, 2014 |
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Epigraph
Dedication
To Otzi,
the original Warded Man
First words
The great horn sounded.

Arlen paused in his work, looking up at the lavender wash of the dawn sky. Morning mist still clung to the air, bringing with its damp an acrid taste that was all too familiar. A quiet dread built in his gut as he waited in the morning stillness, hoping that it had been his imagination. He was eleven years old.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Variant Titles: The Painted Man (UK) = The Warded Man (US).
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Book description
Sometimes there is very good reason to be afraid of the dark...

Eleven-year-old Arlen lives with his parents on their small farmstead, half a day's ride away from the isolated hamlet of Tibbet's Brook.

As dusk falls upon Arlan's world, a strange mist rises from the ground, a mist carrying nightmares to the surface. A mist that promises a violent death to any foolish enough to brave the coming darkness, for hungry corelings - demons that cannot be harmed by mortal weapons - materialize from the vapours to feed on the living. As the sun sets, people have no choice but to take shelter behind magical wards and pray that their protection holds until the creatures dissolve with the first signs of dawn.

When Arlen's life is shattered by the demon plague, he is forced to see that it is fear, rather than the demons, which truly cripples humanity. Believing that there is more to his world than to live in constant fear, he must risk leaving the safety of his wards to discover a different path.

In the small town of Cutter's Hollow, Leesha's perfect future is destroyed by betrayal and a simple lie. Publicly shamed, she is reduced to gathering herbs and tending an old woman more fearsome than the corelings. Yet in her disgrace, she becomes the guardian of dangerous ancient knowledge.

Orphaned and crippled in a demon attack, young Rojer takes solace in mastering the musical arts of a Jongleur, only to learn that his unique talent gives him unexpected power over the night.

Together, these three young people will offer humanity a last, fleeting chance of survival.
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As darkness falls each night, demons known as the corelings rise, and three young survivors of demon attacks risk everything to recover the secrets of the past to defeat the corelings and stop their relentless assault against humans.

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