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Knit Two by Kate Jacobs
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Showing 1-5 of 46 (next | show all)
This sequel to the Friday Night Knitting Club was okay.  It was a slow start at first trying to catch up on the five years between stories.  Everyone was moving on to the next phase of their lives, but still dwelled heavily on the death of their beloved friend.  The best storylines happened on their trip to Italy.  The rest of the story dragged a bit. But, I did like the ending.  I thought Jacobs wrapped the story up fairly well. ( )
  jguidry | May 31, 2016 |
***Spoilers if you've not read the first book in the series***

Sequel to The Friday Night Knitting Club finds the reader back at Walker and Daughter five years after the conclusion of the first novel. A lot has changed since Georgia's death, but the women of the Friday Night Knitting Club still get together, albeit a little less regularly, and rely on each other's friendship. Peri now runs the store while Dakota attends NYU. But when Lucie offers Dakota a chance to spend the summer with her in Italy, Dakota jumps at the chance. As does James, Anita, and Catherine.

Another light read, I was able to finish this book in a day. I was happy to find there were no more emotional twists and was able to just enjoy the book for what it was. It was fun to see Dakota growing up and experiencing the pangs of first love. Anita's storyline was a nice addition as well. I can only say that I'm disappointed that KC still seems to be on the outside of the group as we still don't seem to know any more about her than we did before. ( )
  Mootastic1 | Jan 15, 2016 |
While I enjoyed the Friday Night Knitting Club, this sequel left me wanting more. It didn't have the appeal of her first book ( )
  AstridG | Oct 1, 2015 |
The members of The Friday Night Knitting Club have continued its weekly meetings five years after the death of the founder, Georgia Walker, owner of Walker and Daughter. Dakota, her eighteen-year-old daughter has been able to keep the shop open with the help of some of the other members, especially Peri, who has expanded the business to include felted handbags and accessories. Dakota loves the women, but her real career interest is somewhere else.
The women are all going through changes in their lives. A widow, seventy-eight-year old Anita is in a serious relationship with deli owner, Marty. Her sons strenuously oppose it. As she plans their wedding, she decides to try to find her younger sister who she hasn’t seen since throwing her out decades ago. Lucie, a member of the sandwich generation, has a career as a film maker which creates problems caring for her daughter and mother. Professor Darwin has finally been able to carry a pregnancy to term and is carrying twins. And Catherine, owner of an antiques and wineshop, is looking for love after her divorce.
Knitting and love of Georgia are the bonds that hold the women together, though all of them don’t knit very much. But they care for each other and help each other find themselves as well as reach their goals. Much of the story takes place in Italy where several of the women spend part of their summer on separate projects.
Some interesting observations:
Anita used her age to her advantage. “Doddering old woman? Far from it. Though playing the act was one useful thing about getting older: folks let their guard down around seemingly harmless old people, and sometimes that made it much easier for things to work out the way she wanted them to.”
How to tell if you’re going senile? “Do something fairly outrageous–rude, even–and see if people still treat you kindly. If they do, you’re officially an old bat.”
“People change. Life is just a process to figure out who we are.”
KNIT TWO ends with the instructions for an afghan and recipes for Maple Apple Muffins and Raspberry-Lime Granita.
This book is the second in the series. There are a lot of references to the first book, but it isn’t necessary to have read it to appreciate this one. Kate Jacobs’ writing style is first class. Unfortunately, I found the ending much too contrived. Anita wouldn’t be as difficult planning the details for her wedding. I also don’t think the women would be as fixated on Georgia five years after her death. ( )
  Judiex | Apr 23, 2015 |
I thoroughly enjoyed The Friday Night Knitting Club so I was so excited to learn that it was the first in a series and couldn't wait to read Book #2. Well, I almost put the book down during the opening pages.

This book to me is written in the "old style" series where the author believes that in order for the next title in the series to be successful that they need to do a full recap of Book #1 before moving on to the next story. Not true!

Since I enjoyed the first novel so very much I decided to persevere and keep reading. When the recap was over and the new story began I did enjoy resuming 'life' with the characters in this series. However, I did downgrade it a full star due to the repetitive writing which wasn't necessary to the pleasure and appreciation of this story.

I will continue reading the series as I'm curious as to learn if Book 1 and Book 2 will be recapped in Book 3 before further exploration into the next adventure. If that is the case, I will stop reading this series. ( )
  Corduroy7 | Dec 19, 2014 |
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It was after hours at Walker and Daughter: Knitters, and Dakota stood in the center of the Manhattan yarn shop and wrestled with the cellophane tape. She had spent more than twenty minutes trying to surround a canvas Peg Perego double stroller in shimmery yellow wrapping paper, the cardboard roll repeatedly flopping out of the paper onto the floor of the shop and the seeming miles of gift wrap crinkling and tearing with each move.
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18-year-old Dakota is at NYU, discovering her first love, while her father James and Georgia's best friend Catherine are still coming to terms. The rest of the cast runs a wide gamut of ages and experience, but is easier to follow this time around, as Jacobs is more comfortable giving them more space and backstory. Pregnant, whip-smart professor Darwin and her husband, Dan, are welcoming twins; video director and single mom Lucie is coping with a hyperactive 5-year-old and a failing parent; Georgia's old mentor, the wise Anita, begins questioning her own motives.
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Knit Two returns to the Manhattan knitting store Walker & Daughter five years after the death of the store's owner, Georgia Walker. Georgia's daughter Dakota runs the knitting store part-time with the help of the members of the Friday Night Knitting Club. Drawn together by their love for Dakota and the sense of family the club provides, each knitter is struggling with new challenges.… (more)

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