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The Annotated Alice: Alice's Adventures in…
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The Annotated Alice: Alice's Adventures in Wonderland & Through the… (original 2000; edition 1999)

by Lewis Carroll

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2,147293,035 (4.52)25
Member:deedeeinfj
Title:The Annotated Alice: Alice's Adventures in Wonderland & Through the Looking-Glass
Authors:Lewis Carroll
Info:W. W. Norton & Company (1999), Updated, Hardcover
Collections:Your library
Rating:****
Tags:fiction, children, young adult, classics

Work details

The Annotated Alice: The Definitive Edition by Lewis Carroll (2000)

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» See also 25 mentions

English (27)  German (1)  Hebrew (1)  All (29)
Showing 1-5 of 27 (next | show all)
I have loved Alice for a long time. As a mathematician, a poet and a lover of children's literature, it's the perfect fit for me.
For a long time, I had the children's classic edition. But I wanted the annotated version and when I got it, I handed off the old book to the used book store. (I sometimes wish I hadn't done that. I had to do a new list of the poems and what page to find each one.)
( )
  CarolJMO | Dec 12, 2016 |
This book really defined for me what an annotated book should be, as I'm sure it has for many other readers. ( )
  tlockney | Sep 7, 2014 |
The texts of Alice in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass, with Teniel's illustrations and sidenotes by Martin Gardner. Some are practical -- what candle extinguishers were, why Carroll though whiting had their tails in their mouths -- there is also a useful charting of the moves of the chess-game sequence, and texts of now-neglected poems parodied by Carroll etc. Some comments are more tendentious such as suggesting Carroll would have liked to sing a love song to Alice. ( )
  antiquary | Nov 28, 2013 |
Due to Coursera, I do read multiple of version of Alice and I've reviewed the first story before but this edition is what you should look for if you ever have any critical writing with the both Alice stories. I won't go into the details about the story but one of the major advantage of having this book was the annotations of it. Alice is infamous for the riddles and puzzles with the words and sometimes within its original illustrations. Having this edition is like having additional text or study guide as you read.

Some include poems, the history of the writer himself, how his brilliance is applied in his writing which are quite difficult to emulate even to me as an average writer. As you read, you'll find there's a lot of references in a page of the book which made it worthwhile to spend days and months in interpreting everything.

It is great for adult readers of Alice in Wonderland if anyone was afraid of being seen with a campy children's copy. Consider Alice in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass as interpretive as a Shakespearean drama. Besides, you'll have some insight in what might have been in the earlier centuries of the revolutionary start of English literature and the genius behind the works which are still hardly been emulated until circa Neil Gaiman.
( )
  aoibhealfae | Sep 23, 2013 |
Due to Coursera, I do read multiple of version of Alice and I've reviewed the first story before but this edition is what you should look for if you ever have any critical writing with the both Alice stories. I won't go into the details about the story but one of the major advantage of having this book was the annotations of it. Alice is infamous for the riddles and puzzles with the words and sometimes within its original illustrations. Having this edition is like having additional text or study guide as you read.

Some include poems, the history of the writer himself, how his brilliance is applied in his writing which are quite difficult to emulate even to me as an average writer. As you read, you'll find there's a lot of references in a page of the book which made it worthwhile to spend days and months in interpreting everything.

It is great for adult readers of Alice in Wonderland if anyone was afraid of being seen with a campy children's copy. Consider Alice in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass as interpretive as a Shakespearean drama. Besides, you'll have some insight in what might have been in the earlier centuries of the revolutionary start of English literature and the genius behind the works which are still hardly been emulated until circa Neil Gaiman.
( )
  aoibhealfae | Sep 23, 2013 |
Showing 1-5 of 27 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors (7 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Lewis Carrollprimary authorall editionscalculated
Gardner, MartinIntroductionsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Gardner, MartinEditorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Tenniel, JohnIllustratorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
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Epigraph
Alice, Where Art Thou?

Quaint child, old-fashioned Alice, lend your dream:
I would be done with modern story-spinners,
Follow with you the laughter and the gleam:
Weary am I, this night, of saints and sinners.
We have been friends since Lewis and old Tenniel
Housed you immortally in red and gold.
Come! Your naivete is a spring perennial:
Let me be young again before I’m old.

You are a glass of youth: this night I choose
Deep in your magic labyrinths to stray,
Where rants the Red Queen in her splendid hues
And the White Rabbit hurries on his way.
Let us once more adventure, hand in hand:
Give me belief again—in Wonderland!

- Vincent Starrett, in Brillig (Chicago: Dierkes Press, 1949)
Dedication
To the thousands of readers of my Annotated Alice and More Annotated Alice who took the time to send letters of appreciation, and to offer corrections and suggestions for new notes.
First words
All in the golden afternoon
Full leisurely we glide;
For both our oars, with little skill,
By little arms are plied,
While little hands make vain pretence
Our wanderings to guide.
Quotations
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Includes both Annotated Alice and More Annotated Alice as well as additional material. Please do not combine with Annotated Alice.
Publisher's editors
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Haiku summary

Amazon.com Amazon.com Review (ISBN 0393048470, Hardcover)

"What is the use of a book," thought Alice, "without pictures or conversations!"

Readers who share Alice's taste in books will be more than satisfied with The Annotated Alice, a volume that includes not only pictures and conversations, but a thorough gloss on the text as well. There may be some, like G.K. Chesterton, who abhor the notion of putting Lewis Carroll's masterpiece under a microscope and analyzing it within an inch of its whimsical life. But as Martin Gardner points out in his introduction, so much of Alice in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass is composed of private jokes and details of Victorian manners and mores that modern audiences are not likely to catch. Yes, Alice can be enjoyed on its own merits, but The Annotated Alice appeals to the nosy parker in all of us. Thus we learn, for example, that the source of the mouse's tale may have been Alfred Lord Tennyson who "once told Carroll that he had dreamed a lengthy poem about fairies, which began with very long lines, then the lines got shorter and shorter until the poem ended with fifty or sixty lines of two syllables each." And that, contrary to popular belief, the Mad Hatter character was not a parody of then Prime Minister Gladstone, but rather was based on an Oxford furniture dealer named Theophilus Carter.

Gardner's annotations run the gamut from the factual and historical to the speculative and are, in their own way, quite as fascinating as the text they refer to. Occasionally, he even comments on himself, as when he quotes a fellow annotator of Alice, James Kincaid: "The historical context does not call for a gloss but the passage provides an opportunity to point out the ambivalence that may attend the central figure and her desire to grow up." And then follows with a charming riposte: "I thank Mr. Kincaid for supporting my own rambling." There's a lot of information in the margins (indeed, the page is pretty evenly divided between Carroll's text and Gardner's), but the ramblings turn out to be well worth the time. So hand over your old copy of Lewis Carroll's classic to the kids--this Alice in Wonderland is intended entirely for adults. --Alix Wilber

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:19:47 -0400)

(see all 5 descriptions)

Forty years after Gardner's groundbreaking publication of the annotated version of Carroll's most famous work comes this new version, featuring fascinating insights, notes and newly discovered line drawings.

(summary from another edition)

Legacy Library: Lewis Carroll

Lewis Carroll has a Legacy Library. Legacy libraries are the personal libraries of famous readers, entered by LibraryThing members from the Legacy Libraries group.

See Lewis Carroll's legacy profile.

See Lewis Carroll's author page.

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