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Confessions of a Failed Southern Lady by…
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Confessions of a Failed Southern Lady (original 1985; edition 1990)

by Florence King

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4691632,110 (4.08)14
Member:janetkovatch
Title:Confessions of a Failed Southern Lady
Authors:Florence King
Info:St. Martin's Press (1990), Paperback, 278 pages
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Confessions of a Failed Southern Lady by Florence King (1985)

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Showing 1-5 of 16 (next | show all)
Fun, easy read, nothing I could really relate to, but certainly a good beach book. ( )
  Rdra1962 | Aug 1, 2018 |
Synopsis: Florence King was the daughter of a woman who didn't fit into a mold. She held a job in a time when married women were supposed to be at home; she swore; she played baseball. Her father was a Brit who played in bands and worked as a bartender; when not working he read widely and extensively. Florence's grandmother made it her goal in life to make this child into a 'lady'. Florence lived through this rather schizophrenic parenting and tell about her life from childhood through a few years after college.
Review: This is a most entertaining book. The first and third portions have you laughing out loud; the middle third is a bit plodding but still enjoyable. So much of what she writes about is still true in the deep south to this day. ( )
  DrLed | Apr 5, 2017 |
This book made me laugh so hard I wept. I am indebted to her for the expression Ovariad which is the propensity some women have for giving detailed descriptions of their gynecological problems. Her poltics are funky though - don't go there. ( )
1 vote laurenbufferd | Nov 14, 2016 |
I'm loathe to admit how much I enjoyed this, seeing that Southern humor is something I actively avoid. Somehow, though, King won me over. She manages to paint the lives of herself and those around her in a way that employs a certain element of caricature without becoming schtick or saccharine. ( )
  Sandra_Berglund | Apr 2, 2016 |
Florence King wrote her stories of growing up in the south in the 1940s and 1950s, and problems of race, class, belonging, position, status, relationships, security and family desires for their children and grandchildren to be different and sometimes contradictory things. An especially touching book about a smart girl growing up in a society that did not appreciate or nurture smart women; one that expected their children to behave within social norms, when eccentricity was part of her upbringing; of life among the gentile poor.

As usual, she has an observant and wicked eye for other people, rendering the most pretentious to simple stereotypes, and then surprisingly, showing them also to be fully three dimensional and caring people. Her ideas of race, sex, class and southernisms are very humorous, and the reader can see that she would have been a difficult girl to raise, even in a one-child family.
The last third of the book devotes itself to her challenging and sometimes tragic lesbianism interactions, but it is handled, most of the time, with humor and grace. All though the book, even if the reader does not agree with her, the writer is a good traveling companion, showing off interesting sites and people along the way, some good, some bad, some subjected to penetrating wit.
I was saddened to learn she died recently. That is a shame, since the world needs more people like Florence King. But then, not too many people like her. I don't think we could stand it. Indeed, Ah don't! ( )
1 vote hadden | Mar 7, 2016 |
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Epigraph
"Like most exceptional women, Rosa was not entirely feminine."
~ The Duchess of Jermyn Street,
Daphne Fielding
Dedication
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My ladylike adventures have taken me from Seattle to Paris, but last year I was carried back to Tidewater Virginia, which my ancestors helped to unsettle.
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Book description
VIRAGO EDITION:
When Florence King was born, her Granny, a would-be Virginia grande dame, moved in. Granny's dream of raising a perfect Southern belle had failed dismally with her own daughter, a chain-smoking, baseball-playing tomboy given to wild expletives. Florence is Granny's last hope....
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0312050631, Paperback)

Confessions of a Failed Southern Lady is Florence King's classic memoir of her upbringing in an eccentric Southern family, told with all the uproarious wit and gusto that has made her one of the most admired writers in the country. Florence may have been a disappointment to her Granny, whose dream of rearing a Perfect Southern Lady would never be quite fulfilled. But after all, as Florence reminds us, "no matter which sex I went to bed with, I never smoked on the street."

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:17:32 -0400)

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