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The Fifties by David Halberstam
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The Fifties (original 1994; edition 1993)

by David Halberstam

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1,284236,108 (4.13)12
Member:Bpolybius
Title:The Fifties
Authors:David Halberstam
Info:Villard Books (1993), Hardcover
Collections:Your library
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Tags:American, history, 1950s, journalism, cultural history, social history, economic history, political history

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The Fifties by David Halberstam (1994)

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Showing 1-5 of 23 (next | show all)
Who knew that the Fifties were so dascinating?

As a child in the 1950s I missed the import of much of what went on in the world. As a teenager in the 1960s, i thought of the Fifties as another era with a dramatic break between. Halberstam vividly shows that so much of what has happened since has deep and profound roots in the decade that gets unfairly painted as monochrome. ( )
  dasam | Jul 25, 2017 |
Extremely well done chronicling of this critical decade in our country...Reads like a novel, but loaded with important
insights. ( )
  RickTheobald | Jul 13, 2017 |
A really interesting read. So many things got their start in the 50s ( )
  nx74defiant | Apr 30, 2017 |
History of the 1950s ( )
  JackSweeney | Jan 9, 2017 |
The 1950s. The greatest generation. To put it into perspective, Churchill announced America was poised to be the most powerful country in the world by 1950. The 1950s also gave birth to the microwave oven, Lucy and Desi, desegregation, Holiday Inns, the photocopier, McDonald's restaurant, the credit card, the polio vaccination, hip=shaking Elvis, the discovery of DNA, the color TV...I could go on and on but Halberstam does that for me brilliantly in The Fifties. He covers everything from inventions to politics; from fads to phenomenons; from people to places.
One of the best things about The Fifties is the insight into personal lives. For example, who knew that General Douglas MacArthur was a mama's boy? She "took up residence in a nearby hotel for four years" (p 80), while MacArthur was in school. Or that Lucille Ball was adamant about her real Cuban husband playing the role in I Love Lucy?

As an aside: you can't launch into the 1950s without backing up and talking about the mid to late 1940s. Expect a little history lesson before the history lesson. ( )
  SeriousGrace | Nov 17, 2016 |
Showing 1-5 of 23 (next | show all)
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For Julia Sandness Halberstam
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In the beginning, that era was dominated by the shadow of a man no longer there—Franklin D. Roosevelt.
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This ebook features an extended biography of David Halberstam.
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Amazon.com Amazon.com Review (ISBN 0449909336, Paperback)

"In retrospect," writes David Halberstam, "the pace of the fifties seemed slower, almost languid. Social ferment, however, was beginning just beneath this placid surface." He shows how the United States began to emerge from the long shadow of FDR's 12-year presidency, with the military-industrial complex and the Beat movement simultaneously growing strong. Television brought not only situation comedies but controversial congressional hearings into millions of living rooms. While Alfred Kinsey was studying people's sex lives, Gregory Pincus and other researchers began work on a pill that would forever alter the course of American reproductive practices. Halberstam takes on these social upheavals and more, charting a course that is as easy to navigate as it is wide-ranging.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:19:08 -0400)

(see all 4 descriptions)

"The Fifties is a sweeping social, political, economic, and cultural history of the ten years that David Halberstam regards as seminal in determining what our nation is today. It is the decade of Joe McCarthy and the young Martin Luther King, the Korean War and Levittown, Jack Kerouac and Elvis Presley." "Halberstam not only gives us the titans of the age - Eisenhower, Dulles, Oppenheimer, MacArthur, Hoover, and Nixon - but also Harley Earl, who put fins on cars; Dick and Mac McDonald and Ray Kroc, who mass-produced the American hamburger; Kemmons Wilson, who placed his Holiday Inns along the nation's roadsides; U-2 pilot Francis Gary Powers; Grace Metalious, who wrote Peyton Place; and "Goody" Pincus, who led the team that invented the Pill. Here is a portrait of a time of conflict, at once an age of astonishing material affluence and a period of great political anxiety." "We follow, among other things, the quickening pace of American life and the powerful impact of national television, still in its infancy, on American society: from the Kefauver hearings to I Love Lucy to Charles Van Doren and the quiz-show scandals to the young John Chancellor of NBC covering the Little Rock riots and holding up a disturbing mirror to America."--BOOK JACKET.… (more)

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