HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Troy by Adèle Geras
Loading...

Troy (2000)

by Adèle Geras

Other authors: See the other authors section.

Series: Trojan Saga (1)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
7172020,347 (3.61)23
Told from the point of view of the women of Troy, portrays the last weeks of the Trojan War, when women are sick of tending the wounded, men are tired of fighting, and bored gods and goddesses find ways to stir things up.

None.

Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 23 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 20 (next | show all)
A retelling of the fall of Troy as a YA romance? It sounds kind of awful, but it sort of works. I liked it, at any rate. Geras is quite faithful to the original myths, and I love her take on the gods and how their interactions with mortals work. ( )
  electrascaife | Jan 28, 2018 |
I love anything that has to do with the Trojan War and this was an interesting take on the well known subject but it was just shy of boring. ( )
  Tabatha014 | Mar 31, 2016 |
This book tells the story of the end of the Trojan War, focusing on two sisters, young servant girls that work for Hector's family. Xanthe and Marpessa are sisters who thanks to Aphrodite's meddling are in love with the same boy. We also follow a bunch of other minor towns folk including three elderly serving women, Iason (in love w/ Xanthe) and Polyxena (the singers granddaughter, friends w/ the sisters, in love with Iason).

It's interesting to see the girls personal problems against the back drop of the larger issues of the war. The war is followed and you see what parts don't affect them. There are many myths interspersed in the story in a very natural way. You also get to see some larger then life characters very humanized.

I really liked the language as well. The whole story was just beautifully written. I absolutely loved it. ( )
  Rosa.Mill | Nov 21, 2015 |
This book tells the story of the end of the Trojan War, focusing on two sisters, young servant girls that work for Hector's family. Xanthe and Marpessa are sisters who thanks to Aphrodite's meddling are in love with the same boy. We also follow a bunch of other minor towns folk including three elderly serving women, Iason (in love w/ Xanthe) and Polyxena (the singers granddaughter, friends w/ the sisters, in love with Iason).

It's interesting to see the girls personal problems against the back drop of the larger issues of the war. The war is followed and you see what parts don't affect them. There are many myths interspersed in the story in a very natural way. You also get to see some larger then life characters very humanized.

I really liked the language as well. The whole story was just beautifully written. I absolutely loved it. ( )
  Rosa.Mill | Nov 21, 2015 |
This book tells the story of the end of the Trojan War, focusing on two sisters, young servant girls that work for Hector's family. Xanthe and Marpessa are sisters who thanks to Aphrodite's meddling are in love with the same boy. We also follow a bunch of other minor towns folk including three elderly serving women, Iason (in love w/ Xanthe) and Polyxena (the singers granddaughter, friends w/ the sisters, in love with Iason).

It's interesting to see the girls personal problems against the back drop of the larger issues of the war. The war is followed and you see what parts don't affect them. There are many myths interspersed in the story in a very natural way. You also get to see some larger then life characters very humanized.

I really liked the language as well. The whole story was just beautifully written. I absolutely loved it. ( )
  Rosa.Mill | Nov 21, 2015 |
Showing 1-5 of 20 (next | show all)
"With exceptional grace and enormous energy, Geras (The Tower Room; Pictures of the Night) recreates the saga of the Trojan war from a feminist perspective, by delving into the hearts and minds of the women behind the scenes."
added by bookfitz | editPublishers Weekly (May 7, 2001)
 

» Add other authors (3 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Adèle Gerasprimary authorall editionscalculated
Jay, AlisonCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed

Is a retelling of

You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
This book is dedicated to the memory of
REGINA GLICK
with affection and gratitude
First words
'They'll be here later on,' said Charitomene.
Quotations
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.61)
0.5
1 2
1.5
2 8
2.5 6
3 37
3.5 7
4 40
4.5 5
5 20

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 138,810,222 books! | Top bar: Always visible