HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Resenting the Hero by Moira J. Moore
Loading...

Resenting the Hero (original 2006; edition 2006)

by Moira J. Moore

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
4302824,529 (3.76)8
Member:wyvernfriend
Title:Resenting the Hero
Authors:Moira J. Moore
Info:Ace Books (2006), Mass Market Paperback
Collections:Your library
Rating:****
Tags:fiction, bookcrossing, bookring, read, may, 2007, fantasy, humour, clubvlad

Work details

Resenting the Hero by Moira J. Moore (2006)

2007 (3) 2008 (5) adventure (9) comedy (5) comic fantasy (3) ebook (3) fantasy (148) fiction (38) Hero Series (5) humor (19) humorous (3) Kindle (3) library (3) magic (19) own (7) owned (4) paperback (3) partnership (5) pb (3) psychics (3) read (8) read in 2006 (3) romance (12) series (10) sf (6) sff (6) Source & Shield (7) to-read (21) unread (3) weather (4)
None
  1. 30
    Swords of Haven by Simon R. Green (thewalkinggirl)
    thewalkinggirl: There's something about the world-building or overall concept that makes me think of one series while reading the other. I can't explain it any better, sorry.
  2. 11
    Ill Wind by Rachel Caine (MyriadBooks)
    MyriadBooks: For controlling the weather and other unusual magics.
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 8 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 28 (next | show all)
In a bookstore, the cover art would have sent me running as far away as possible. It is beyond bad. But this story was fun and a solid read! I love the two main characters, and it's an interesting world.

My thanks to Felicia Day for the recommendation. I also appreciate that my kindle doesn't show me the cover art, so I was able to enjoy this story without being aware of that cover. I have now looked at the covers for all six of the published books in this series, and I don't get it. When did Ace, a publisher I grew up with, get such bad taste? How did this artwork get approved? Did they want the books to fail? It makes me sad for Moira J. Moore. Marketing does matter...somebody should let Ace in on this little secret. ( )
  camibrite | May 25, 2014 |
I believe it was at the suggestion of someone here that I picked up the first couple books of this series. If it was I want to thank the person because I really enjoyed this book much more than I ever expected.

Although I thought the book sounded interesting it has sat on my shelf for a while because the heroine sounded so prissy...and sometimes I find that hard to handle in a main character. Actually, she was a bit prissy, but in what I found to be a not so annoying way.

I really liked the mythology the author has created here, it was different than anything I've read before. The idea of Sources evolved into protectors of humanity on a world with a hostile environment was different as was the Shield concept of being protectors whether or not the person they are "bound" to is likeable or even nice. Both Sources and Shields have certain characteristics while maybe at odds within themselves, provided the characters an interesting dichotomy. The conflict itself, when it came to fruitation, was a pretty standard plot feature overall, but the characters, their abilities and personalities raised this book into something more than what I considered standard fantasy.

As I stated before, I found this story much more enjoyable than I originally anticipated and have gone happily on directly to the second book of the series. ( )
  Jenson_AKA_DL | Jun 11, 2013 |
I enjoyed this book on a couple of levels. Moore does a wonderful job with the two main characters, creating believable personality conflicts and bringing both of them around to the reveal without undue angst or artificial situations. I look forward to reading more about Taro and Lee's developing partnership in future books.

The world building in RESENTING THE HERO was also well done. I enjoyed figuring out the relative roles of Shields and Sources, as well as trying to understand how the mold might be broken. The Triple S organization was interesting in it's own right, as I tried to understand what parts of the organization were based on good practice, and what parts were simply tradition hanging on past usefulness.

Moore doesn't wrap everything up wtih a bow at the end, rather, she resolves some conflict while setting the stage for the over all arc of the series. I'm looking forward to reading the next one. ( )
  Capnrandm | Apr 15, 2013 |
he cover led me to expect a different book (the cover is sunny; the book is not) but once I got over that, I enjoyed this one a lot. The worldbuilding was interesting and the relationship between the two main characters was unusual enough to be fun. [Oct. 2011] ( )
  maureene87 | Apr 4, 2013 |
RESENTING THE HERO is the start to an excellent series, much better than you'd guess looking at the title or cover art. I decided to trust other reviews pointing this out, and now I'm repeating it in mine because it's true.

The origin story for this fantasy series sets up the odd world where Lee and Taro, our hero and heroine, have their adventures: nearly six hundred years before the start of the story, spaceships descended from the sky. The passengers intended to settle, but when their sophisticated machinery didn't operate properly and the beautiful landscape was constantly beset by terrible natural disasters, most of them packed up and left. The result? The state of technology is relatively primitive, but morals are relatively modern. Example: characters travel on land via carriages but enjoy near total gender equality. Since I really like a good medieval-style sword and sorcery novel and also really enjoy modern sensibilities, I was pretty tickled by how cleverly this world was designed.

The zeitgeist is familiar, rational and scientific, with the notable exception of the Sources and Shields - who are able, through their combined efforts, to "channel" the energy of natural disasters into a harmless form. Sources channel the energy, and Shields stop them from dying in the process. While any Shield and Source can work together, almost all of them bond to a particular partner, forming a Pair. The connection is instant and life-long, and if one member of the Pair dies, the other does too.

The narrator, Dunleavy Mallorough (Lee), is a Shield, and a very gifted one. Shields are unemotional, sensible people who are numbed to physical sensations like pain but profoundly, intensely affected by music. Lee is intensely practical, intensely cerebral, with a wicked dry wit. She's very funny, though sometimes it's just because she finds regular people - people with emotions - completely mystifying.

Much has been made of Lee's dislike for the Source she's matched up with - handsome, aristocratic, charming, and wildly talented Shintaro Karish (Taro). After all, what's to dislike about being professionally attached at the hip to a bona-fide hero? Well, as Lee points out, "I would die with this man. He'd catch some sexual disease, or some enraged spouse would kill him, and the bond would drag me down with him. He was that sort, the sort that shone too bright and burned out fast." Can I just say that I love her narrative voice? Lee is straightforward, always cutting right to the stinging heart of the matter. And Taro shines brightly indeed. It would be noble of Lee to want her destiny tied to his - but it's sensible to hope for something less dramatic.

RESENTING THE HERO seems to wander a bit as Lee and Taro meet up, travel to their assigned city of High Scape, and settle in. But the wandering is an illusion - everything adds up at the end, as the Pair unravel a plot to destroy the city. I've read all four books currently available in the series, and I really like the way that the series is going. Not only do Lee and Taro develop as characters, but the world they live in does too. Big changes are afoot, and Lee and Taro are at the center of them. But the real centerpiece of this series, it's spine and chief delight, is the relationship between Lee and Taro - opposites in almost every way, they are excellent partners to one another. ( )
  MlleEhreen | Apr 3, 2013 |
Showing 1-5 of 28 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
For my parents, Charlie and Kathy, and my sisters, Deidre and Eileen
First words
"Not feeling any uncontrollable urges, are you?" the low voice in my ear teased. I looked up at the speaker and said, "Huh?"
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

Book description
In a realm beset by natural disasters, only the magical abilities of the bonded Pairs - Source and Shield - make the land habitable and keep the citizenry safe. The ties that bind them are far beyond the relationships between lovers or kin - and last their entire lives. Whether they like it or not...

Since she was a child, Dunleavy Mallorough has been nurturing her talents as a Shield, preparing for her day of bonding. Unfortunately, fate decrees Lee's partner to be the legendary, handsome, and unbearably self-assured Lord Shintaro Karish. Sure, he cuts a fine figure with his aristocratic airs and undeniable courage. But Karish's popularity and notoriety - in bed and out - make him the last Source Lee ever wanted to be stuck with.

The duo is assigned to High Scape, a city so besieged by disaster that seven bonded Pairs are needed to combat it. But when an inexplicable force strikes down every other Source and Shield, Karish and Lee must put aside their differences in order to defeat something even more unnatural than their reluctant affections for each other...
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0441013880, Mass Market Paperback)

In a realm beset by natural disasters, only the magical abilities of the bonded Pairs—Source and Shield—make the land habitable and keep the citizenry safe. The ties that bind them are far beyond the relationships between lovers or kin—and last their entire lives…

Whether they like it or not.

Since she was a child, Dunleavy Mallorough has been nurturing her talents as a Shield, preparing for her day of bonding. Unfortunately, fate decrees Lee’s partner to be the legendary, handsome, and unbearably self-assured Lord Shintaro Karish. Sure, he cuts a fine figure with his aristocratic airs and undeniable courage. But Karish’s popularity and notoriety—in bed and out—make him the last Source Lee ever wanted to be stuck with.

The duo is assigned to High Scape, a city so besieged by disaster that seven bonded pairs are needed to combat it. But when an inexplicable force strikes down every other Source and Shield, Lee and Karish must put aside their differences in order to defeat something even more unnatural than their reluctant affections for each other…

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 14:04:30 -0400)

(see all 2 descriptions)

No library descriptions found.

Quick Links

Swap Ebooks Audio
1 avail.
28 wanted
3 pay

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.76)
0.5
1 1
1.5 1
2 5
2.5 2
3 33
3.5 19
4 41
4.5 10
5 23

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

Help/FAQs | About | Privacy/Terms | Blog | Contact | LibraryThing.com | APIs | WikiThing | Common Knowledge | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | 91,485,377 books! | Top bar: Always visible