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Child of the Prophecy (The Sevenwaters…
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Child of the Prophecy (The Sevenwaters Trilogy, Book 3) (original 2001; edition 2003)

by Juliet Marillier

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1,506314,914 (3.95)42
Member:cutelilnymph
Title:Child of the Prophecy (The Sevenwaters Trilogy, Book 3)
Authors:Juliet Marillier
Info:Tor Books (2003), Edition: First Edition, Mass Market Paperback, 608 pages
Collections:Your library
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Child of the Prophecy by Juliet Marillier (2001)

  1. 10
    Heir to Sevenwaters by Juliet Marillier (Kerian)
  2. 00
    Plain Kate by Erin Bow (quigui)
    quigui: I found there were certain themes in common: a girl people think is a witch, gipsies (with a love for horses), a lot of folklore. Plain Kate reminded me a lot of Child of the Prophecy and it's a very good book as well.
  3. 00
    The Winter Prince by Elizabeth E. Wein (infiniteletters)
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It was nice to read the ending to the trilogy, and to revisit the world of Sevenwaters, but I didn't really like Child of the prophecy that much. The truth is, Fainne simply is not the heroine that Sorcha or Liadan were. Where you cannot help but cheer them on, with Fainne, you're reduced to shoutin at her to turn around. And that takes 60% of the book. Sure, she is misguided, and the bad things she does, she does under duress. But does that mean she cannot help it? Her first evil act ends in death. Perhaps that was an accident, but does that mean she was not culpable? She knows she is being forced to do something evil, something she doesn't want to do. So does she take care, to do the minimum of damage? Ok, she plans to turn the girl back. But she changes her in a FISH! That is cruel to begin with. The transformation perhaps she was forced to and that is bad enough. But then you pick an animal that is absolutely helpless and out of its element, you pick an animal that cannot run, that cannot BREATHE! That was cruel and it was HER idea. Then the second time. One might think that after the disastrous events of the previous time, Fainne would take more care. Instead she is careless and another disaster happens. Of course she feels remorse. Somehow I don't completely buy it, though. Fainne keeps saying that it is her fault, even though she didn't mean to do it. Sounds more like a reminder to us, a nudge from the author to make sure we don't loose our sympathy for her. Quite frankly, I didn't have much to begin with. I also thought Fainne was taking her sweet time before realising that protection of her father cannot remain an excuse forever. At some point the horror you're committing starts to outweigh the horror you're preventing.
Finally Fainne does turn around, but even then, I felt she could have been more. For being a strong sorceress, a bit more fireworks and awesomeness would have been nice. And on top of that, I didn't like her boyfriend either. Mostly because he keeps telling her she cannot take care of herself, the little prick. And then he gets in her way and ruins her plans, all in the name of perseverance and love. Eugh.

No, this was not the best of the books for me. I liked the Foimhore, I liked Liadan's healer daughter, I liked seeing more of Liadan herself and Bran, and the life they made for themselves. So I'll give it a few stars, but this was not the ending I was hoping for... ( )
  zjakkelien | Jul 28, 2014 |
Child of the Prophecy (Sevenwaters #3) by Juliet Marillier narrated by, Heather O'Neill

Fianne daughter of Niamh and Ciaran comes to Sevenwaters after her mother’s death and is welcomed into the family fold, however things aren’t as they seem because the Sevenwaters clan has no idea she has been tutored not only in the ways of a druid by her father but in the dark arts by her grandmother the evil sorceress who was the one who cast the spell on the sons of Sevenwaters. In a long ago prophecy it states that it will take a child that was neither of Britain nor or Erin but at the same time both, who is marked by the raven to take the sacred island back. Everyone assumes this is Johnny son of Liadan & Bran and the evil sorceress has sent Fianne there to kill him when the moment is right so the prophecy is not fulfilled.

I enjoyed Fianne’s story very much she is as all other Sevenwaters women very strong and goes through a lot but she is being controlled by the sorceress but also still has the good in her that comes from her father’s teachings. She has a very hard road I think the toughest since Sorcha, because she so wants to be good even when the sorceress forces her to do terrible things that injures one of the other daughters of Sevenwaters.

I liked this book because it is filled with the Sevenwaters family no one is really off their own, Fianne is surrounded by people who want her to be good and want her in their lives, her two biggest allies are Finbar the uncle who still wears a swans wing thanks to her grandmother and Darragh her childhood friend. This is also our first look at island of Inis Eala where Bran’s men under the tutelage of his son Johnny are running a sort of school for warriors and we see the families of the men from Son of Shadows including Gull’s wife Biddy who was a favorite character of mine. We also have the creepy Eamonn again and contrary to outward appearances he has not forgiven what he feels are the wrongs done to him by Bran & Liadan.

I would say this is my second favorite of the series after Daughter of the Forest. I thoroughly enjoyed Fianne journey and the outcome, even though fans of the other books may need hankies towards the end, I know I did.


Heather O'Neill’s narration was great, Fianne unlike the rest of her family in Sevenwaters was born in a different part of the county and had a stronger Irish accent more I don’t know maybe lowborn but I thought Heather’s portrayal of her was very well done. I truly enjoyed all her accents. I would definitely listen to more by this narrator.

4 ½ Stars ( )
  susiesharp | Oct 3, 2013 |
It wasn't awful but it didn't engage me. I skimmed the last 100 or so pages because I wanted to know what happened in the end, but I was just tired of slogging through it. The plot was actually interesting, but the prose was sort of lifeless. Its like the author plotted out all three and enjoyed writing the first one, but by the time she got to number three she just ran out of enthusiasm. ( )
  bunwat | Mar 30, 2013 |
This review has been crossposted from my blog Review from The Cosy Dragon Please head there for more in-depth reviews by me.

'Child of the Prophecy' follows Fainne, which is interesting to the reader as the title of the book purports that this novel is about the Child of the Prophecy, thought to be a male. Nevertheless, Fainne is likable, if rather misguided. I thoroughly enjoyed this book, and was sad when I had finished it.

Fainne is the granddaughter of Sorsha and Lady Oonagh and the forbidden child of Niamh and Ciaran. Fainne has had a sheltered childhood, but she must leave her cosy home in Kerry to go out to perform her grandmother's wishes. Travelling with her old childhood friend Darragh is difficult for Fainne, knowing the impossible task her grandmother has set her.

Similarly to the other two books in the trilogy, at the beginning I felt myself wanting to rush with my reading to get to some action faster. Mid-way through the books, things were finally happening, but I was torn as to what the conclusion of the book would be.

The ending is somewhat unexpected, but satisfying, and nail biting right to the end! Often in this novel the reader will notice something before the protagonist does, which makes it more exciting. Fainne is thrown this way and that by others' wills, but it is up to her to make or break things - and not even the reader can tell what she will be able to do.

Marillier has crafted a beautiful narrative - the characters are engaging, the scenery convincing and the plot riveting. The only part I was unsatisfied with was that the book ended too soon! As a concluding novel for a trilogy, 'Child of the Prophecy' tied up the loose ends of the narrative nicely.

I'm hankering after the next two books set in the same world 'Seer of Sevenwaters' and 'Heir to Sevenwaters'. One of these will be my reward for having read and reviewed 10 books from my shelf! I probably won't read it until after review 20 though, as I will want to read the two books together. ( )
  Rosemarie.Herbert | Feb 14, 2013 |
It seems odd to attach the word "disappointing" to anything by Juliet Marillier, she of the unparalleled fantasy works. But CHILD OF THE PROPHECY is generally considered to be one of her weakest, and even knowing that way before going into the book, I was still struck by how disappointed I was. Oh, CHILD OF THE PROPHECY is still miles above 95% of all published books with its fluid, lyrical writing and respect of its characters' multidimensionality. However, two things doomed this book from entering the Annals of Eternal Worship in my opinion--one avoidable, one not so much.

First was the utterly overdramatic portrayal of Lady Oonagh, who, yes, makes a reappearance in this book as, once again, the villain. Only this time Lady Oonagh is ten times worse than she was portrayed in Daughter of the Forest, to the point where she resembles a caricature of a cackling crone using her powers for evil. It got to the point where I was doing all-body cringes whenever her insult- and exclamation point-ridden dialogue appeared on the page, which they unfortunately did with more and more frequency toward the end of the book. Lady Oonagh was a disappointment after the marvelous subtleties in characterization displayed by Marillier in the previous books in the trilogy.

Secondly, and perhaps unavoidably, was how the story set Fainne up to lurch on the edge of the Too Stupid To Live cliff. Such are the woes of a book where the main plot revolves around the main character being blackmailed/terrorized/otherwise manipulated into doing things she does not want to do.

And on a final note, SPOILER ALERT: did Eamonn really have to turn into a lecherous middle-aged man who is randomly redeemed through his act of sacrifice at the very end of the book? ( )
  stephxsu | Dec 1, 2012 |
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Amazon.com Amazon.com Review (ISBN 0765345013, Mass Market Paperback)

The powerful fantasy novel Child of the Prophecy successfully concludes Juliet Marillier's Sevenwaters Trilogy, which chronicles a fated family's three-generation struggle to preserve the failing magic of ancient Ireland.

The daughter of a forbidden romance, Fianne has been raised in isolation and trained in magic by her loving but remote druid-father, Ciaran, and her ruthless sorceress-grandmother, the Lady Oonagh. They send Fianne to Sweetwaters to live among relatives who had no knowledge of her existence and who may have instigated the death of her mother, their sister Niamh. Fianne has come to carry out her grandmother's long-planned vengeance on the clan--and on the Old Ones, who are the source of Ireland's mystic power. Despite her mother's death, Fianne is reluctant to harm her Sweetwaters kin. But if she lets them live, the Lady Oonagh will kill both her father and Darragh, the handsome young horse tamer who has captured Fianne's heart.

Child of the Prophecy works as a standalone novel, but readers will benefit by first reading its equally accomplished prequels, Daughter of the Forest and Son of the Shadows. --Cynthia Ward

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 14:00:46 -0400)

(see all 3 descriptions)

"Magic is fading, and the ways of man are driving the Old Ones to the West, beyond the ken of humankind. The ancient groves are being destroyed, and if nothing is done, Ireland will lose its essential mystic core. The prophecies of long ago have foretold a way to prevent this horror, and it is the Sevenwaters clan that the Spirits of Eire look to for salvation. They are a family bound into the lifeblood of the land, and their promise to preserve the magic has been the cause of great joy to them, as well as great sorrow. It is up to Fianne, daughter of Niamh, the lost sister of Sevenwaters, to solve the riddles of power. She is the shy child of a reclusive sorcerer, and her way is hard, for her father is the son of the wicked sorceress Oonagh, who has emerged from the shadows and seeks to destroy all that Sevenwaters has striven for. Oonagh will use her granddaughter Fianne most cruelly to accomplish her ends, and stops at nothing to see her will done. Will Fianne be strong enough to battle this evil and save those she has come to love?"--P. [4] of cover.… (more)

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