HomeGroupsTalkMoreZeitgeist
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

The Vile Village (A Series of Unfortunate…
Loading...

The Vile Village (A Series of Unfortunate Events, No. 7) (original 2003; edition 2001)

by Lemony Snicket (Author)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
7,62763845 (3.8)61
Under a new government program based on the saying "It takes a village to raise a child," the Baudelaire orphans are adopted by an entire town, with disastrous results.
Member:PooleFamily
Title:The Vile Village (A Series of Unfortunate Events, No. 7)
Authors:Lemony Snicket (Author)
Info:HarperCollins (2001), 272 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:
Tags:None

Work details

The Vile Village by Lemony Snicket (2003)

Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 61 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 62 (next | show all)
Once again, right off the bat, Snicket asks you to go read someone else's book. He says, "And if you insist on reading this book instead of something more cheerful, you will most certainly find yourself moaning in despair instead of wriggling in delight, so if you have any sense at all you will put this book down and pick up another one" (p 6). With an introduction like that, how could you not keep reading Snicket's book? Very clever. By now you know the format: Snicket is still offering meanings for words and phrases. The three orphaned Bauldelaire children are looking for a place to call home. Violet is a teenager and still very much interested in inventions. Klaus is on the cusp of turning thirteen and still loves reading. Sunny is still an infant with four teeth who still can’t speak in full sentences, but she loves to bite things. They have escaped (again) from Count Olaf and his band of wicked accomplices. Banker and Bauldelaire family friend, Mr. Poe, is still in charge of sending the Baudelaire orphans to their next town of tragedy. This time it's V.F.D. ("Village of Fowl Devotees"), a mysterious town covered in crows. The problem is, no one in the town wants to be responsible for the children. As the name suggests, the community is devoted to their murder of crows. At a Council of the Elders, a timid and loner handyman who is too skittish to speak up at Council meetings, is order to become the children's guardian. All day long they must do chores for the community and always be respectful of the crows, crows, and more crows. By day, thousands of them hang around in town but by night they roost in the Nevermore tree on the outskirts of town, conveniently right by the handyman's house.
As an aside, I skipped from Book 3 to 7. By not reading books 4-6 I missed out on Violet working at the Lucky Smells Lumbermill, Klaus being enrolled at Prufrock Preparatory School, and all three children living with a couple named Jerome and Esme Squalor. At the end of book 6 Duncan and Isadora, two of three triplets are kidnapped. In Vile Village it is up to Klaus, Violet, and Sunny to rescue them.
Additionally, what is pretty amazing about the series of unfortunate events the Baudelaire orphans experienced thus far is that they all happened in less than a year’s time. The fire that killed their parents, the escape from Count Olaf’s house, the escape from Uncle Monty’s house, the escape from Aunt Josephine’s cliff side mansion, the time in the Finite Forest, or at 667 Dark Avenue. Books 1-7 take place in less than 365 days. ( )
  SeriousGrace | Jan 6, 2021 |
I've been reading this series as bedtime stories with Milly, although I did have to go back and read a few myself that she had raced through, unable to wait for me to read them to her at the pace of one chapter a night. They are genuinely brilliant books, funny and dark, mysterious and absurd.

Now the orphans have to go and live in a village where the whole village will look after them. It does not go well. Also Jaques Snicket pops up as a character, suggesting the authors world is colliding further with that of the books. ( )
  AlisonSakai | Dec 6, 2020 |
SO now we’ve given up on useless Beaudelaire relatives, and we’re entrusting the orphans to an entire village! Surely a whole village can’t be entirely full of child abusers, right?

Full review here. ( )
  a-shelf-apart | Nov 19, 2019 |
These children need a nap. They’ve been awake for four days straight. ( )
  Shahnareads | Oct 22, 2019 |
Oh my god, would you just tell me already??? ( )
  Monica_P | Nov 22, 2018 |
Showing 1-5 of 62 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review

» Add other authors (8 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Lemony Snicketprimary authorall editionscalculated
Curry, TimNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Helquist, BrettIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
For Beatrice -- When we were together I felt breathless. Now, you are.
First words
No matter who you are, no matter where you live, and no matter how many people are chasing you, what you don't read is often as important as what you do read.
Quotations
The children looked at one another again, a little less hopefully this time. The quoting of an aphorism, like the angry barking of a dog or the smell of overcooked broccoli, rarely indicates that something helpful is about to happen. An aphorism is merely a small group of words arranged in a certain order because they sound good that way, but oftentimes people tend to say them as if they were saying something very mysterious and wise.
"'Murder' is the word for a group of crows, like a flock of geese or a herd of cows or a convention of orthodontists."
Entertaining a notion, like entertaining a baby cousin or entertaining a pack of hyenas, is a dangerous thing to refuse to do. If you refuse to entertain a baby cousin, the baby cousin may get bored and entertain itself by wandering off and falling down a well. If you refuse to entertain a pack of hyenas, they may become restless and entertain themselves by devouring you. But if you refuse to entertain a notion - which is just a fancy way of saying that you refuse to think about a certain idea - you have to be much braver than someone who is merely facing some bloodthirsty animals, or some parents who are upset to find their little darling at the bottom of a well, because nobody knows what an idea will do when it goes off to entertain itself, particularly if the idea comes from a sinister villain.
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (3)

Under a new government program based on the saying "It takes a village to raise a child," the Baudelaire orphans are adopted by an entire town, with disastrous results.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.8)
0.5 3
1 11
1.5 3
2 53
2.5 11
3 366
3.5 64
4 494
4.5 32
5 285

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 155,906,463 books! | Top bar: Always visible