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Escape from Reason by Francis A. Schaeffer
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Escape from Reason (1968)

by Francis A. Schaeffer

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(See my comments on Schaeffer's _How Should We Then Live?_. ( )
  iceT | May 18, 2009 |
Schaeffer takes the late Renaissance/ early Reformation period of the 15th and 16th century in Europe as a watershed of human history. The Renaissance emphasized human reason and the achievements of man. The Reformation emphasized the "will of God" and the authority of Scripture. ( )
  keylawk | Apr 1, 2008 |
Schaffer does a nice job of tracing thinking (reasoning) from the time of Aquinas to the start of post-modernism. When Aquinas incorrectly interpreted the fall of man, he set in motion a chain of reasoning that finds its logical conclusion in post-modernism, wherein there is no God, there is no truth, there are no morals, and man has no value. This is not my favorite subject and the reading is deep, but I still enjoyed this short book. ( )
  james.garriss | Jul 21, 2007 |
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TABLE OF CONTENTS
Chapter 1: Nature and grace -- Aquinas and the autonomous -- painters and writers -- nature versus grace -- Leonardo Da Vinci and Raphael; Chapter 2: A unity of nature and grace -- The Reformation and man -- more about man -- Reformation, Renaissance and morals -- the whole man; Chapter 3: Early modern science -- Kant and Rousseau -- modern modern science -- modern modern morality -- Hegel -- Kierkegaard and the Line of Despair; Chapter 4: The leap -- secular existentialism -- religious existentialism -- the New Theology -- upper storey experiences -- linguistic analysis and the leap; Chapter 5: Arts as the upper storey leap -- poetry: the later Heidegger -- art: Andre Malraux -- Picasso -- Bernstein -- pornography -- the Theatre of the Absurd; Chapter 6: Madness -- the 'usptairs' in film and television -- upper storey mysiticism -- Jesus the undefined banner; Chapter 7: Rationality and fatih -- the Bible can stand on its own -- beginning from myself and yet... -- the source of knowledge we need -- the 'leap in the dark' mentality -- the unchanging in a changing world.
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0877845387, Paperback)

Man is dead. God is dead. Life has become meaningless existence, man a cog in a machine. The only way of escape lies in a nonrational fantasy world of experience, drugs, absurdity, pornography, an elusive "final experience," madness . . . .If this is the twentieth-century mentality, how did it come about? And how can the Christian faith be made meaningful today? In this highly original book Dr. Schaeffer traces the way in which art and philosophy have reflected the dualism in Western thinking introduced at the time of the Renaisance. Today this dualism is expressed in a despair of rationality and an escape into a nonrational world which alone offers hope. It is shown in literature, art and music, theatre and cinema, television and popular culture.

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:53:37 -0400)

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