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Play: How It Shapes the Brain, Opens the…
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Play: How It Shapes the Brain, Opens the Imagination, and Invigorates the… (edition 2009)

by Stuart Brown, Christopher Vaughan

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294838,184 (3.94)2
Member:KittyMommy
Title:Play: How It Shapes the Brain, Opens the Imagination, and Invigorates the Soul
Authors:Stuart Brown
Other authors:Christopher Vaughan
Info:Avery (2009), Edition: 1, Hardcover, 240 pages
Collections:Mom, Currently reading, Read but unowned
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Tags:mom, education

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Play: How It Shapes the Brain, Opens the Imagination, and Invigorates the Soul by Stuart Brown

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Engaging if somewhat simplistic. I liked the specific anecdotes about people and their play experiences, but wished there was more detail about the studies Brown cites. (As other reviewers noted, there's no appendix with further information.) Not much about his overarching argument seems terribly original either, and he states his claims about play over and over. It is useful to have some language, though, to use with people who (unlike me) don't work in a preschool and may not see the importance of free play. ( )
  bostonian71 | Jun 29, 2015 |
I really liked this book, and the explanation of the role play plays in our lives is amazing and profound.

I can't think of a reason for anyone not to read this, but if you are a parent or a teacher you should absolutely make the time for it. (I plan to give it to a couple teachers I know for Xmas.)

The only fault I find for it is the large amount of anecdotal evidence the author cites, this isn't to say he doesn't cite some scientific studies, not at all, but I would have preferred to see more focus on the objective science behind play. I suspect this focus has its roots in the fact that the study of play is a fairly young field. ( )
  qaphsiel | May 11, 2014 |
I really liked this book, and the explanation of the role play plays in our lives is amazing and profound.

I can't think of a reason for anyone not to read this, but if you are a parent or a teacher you should absolutely make the time for it. (I plan to give it to a couple teachers I know for Xmas.)

The only fault I find for it is the large amount of anecdotal evidence the author cites, this isn't to say he doesn't cite some scientific studies, not at all, but I would have preferred to see more focus on the objective science behind play. I suspect this focus has its roots in the fact that the study of play is a fairly young field. ( )
  qaphsiel | May 11, 2014 |
A great topic! I realized, being the happy guy that I am, just how much play I really participate in. There are all sorts of games that I play at work to challenge myself to do better, or go faster, or be more efficient. If I didn't I would be as miserable as the other guys I work with. I always found it remarkable how I was able to avoid the self-fulfilling prophecy that others bring upon themselves. This book made me realize that I am playing games to challenge myself. After reading this book, I have been able to better deal with some of the tantrums that my children have. I also realized how important play was in the training of my dog. The book itself was a little dry, but well worth reading it through. This author was interviewed by Dr. Virginia Campbell on her brain science podcast. ( )
  KR2 | Sep 27, 2011 |
If I could give half star reviews , this would've gotten 3 1/2 stars instead of four. I enjoyed the concepts being discussed, and agree with the overall premise - that play is an essential and underappreciated part of life.It just would've been nice to have more specifics about the studies he mentions, or at the very least, some footnotes so I could have a look at them in more detail. ( )
  tkadlec | Jan 20, 2011 |
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A fascinating blend of cutting-edge neuroscience, biology, psychology, social science, and inspiring human stories of the transformative power of play, this book proves why play just might be the most important work we can ever do.

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