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The reformed pastor: A pattern for personal…
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The reformed pastor: A pattern for personal growth and ministry (Classics… (original 1656; edition 1982)

by Richard Baxter

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Member:RonLAllen
Title:The reformed pastor: A pattern for personal growth and ministry (Classics of faith and devotion)
Authors:Richard Baxter
Info:Multnomah Press (1982), Hardcover, 160 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:*****
Tags:Pastoral Ministry

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The Reformed Pastor by Richard Baxter (1656)

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Packer calls Baxter, “The most outstanding pastor, evangelist and writer…that Puritanism produced.” “In the whole compass of divinity, there is scarcely anything superior to it.”—Daniel Wilson. “A classic treatment that has been a blessing to pastors since its first appearance in 1656. This deserves to be studied in depth.”—The Minister’s Library. “Many good men are but shadows of what... they might be, if the maxims and measures... laid down in this incomparable Treatise were strenuously pursued.”
  Stormrev1 | Jul 18, 2014 |
Good content, but as as these were taken from sermons and speeches that Baxter gave in the 1600's, can be a little difficult to read through. Highly recommend it for the content though, especially for pastors that don't understand their calling as shepherds very well. ( )
  mdubois | Sep 14, 2013 |
I needed to read a this book to do research for a paper. I ended up reading the whole book. Yes, it is typically puritan in that it is quite wordy. Unless you have a real interest in this type of work it would be boring. However, his sincere concern to serve Christ by caring for those individuals in his care and aiding them in being faithful shines through. It's not a fast read although it's an easy read. It's not fast because it's not the kind of book that you can sit down and read in one fell swoop.

Baxter also approaches issues that are interesting in today's church world. He speak's quite openly and critically of churches that understaff parishes, and of clergy that accept such understaffing. He maintains that it is impossible for a minister to do more than public ministry in an understaffed church and that is not sufficient to build up the people, and when there is insufficient care for the people then the church suffers. ( )
  mjperry | Mar 30, 2013 |
This is a must-read for the pastor and someone who believes they are called or desire the office of Elder/pastor. In fact, it should be an annual read. Baxter convicts the reader of the sheer magnitude of the work and inherent laziness that may creep in to the pastor's life. A masterpiece from one of the greats.
  soakland | Jul 1, 2011 |
The Reformed Pastor by Richard Baxter is an extremely slow read. Being that it was written such a long time ago, the language has that sense of dry archaism. While I found it a chore to read, I understand its importance, but more for people who are wanting to be, or are, pastors.

Baxter makes many good points about the purpose of a pastor, addressing his contemporaries who, it seems, were abusing their positions of authority. It was a different world back then, with some pastors profiteering in the name of God. I’m sure there’s no such pastor alive today who would DARE do such a thing.

But if there were, I’d highly recommend they read this book, and learn what it means to be a pastor, and not just an entertainment figure whose watered-down gospel tastes more like Chicken Soup than the fruit of the spirit. ( )
  aethercowboy | Sep 16, 2010 |
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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Richard Baxterprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Brown, WilliamEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Packer, J.I.Introductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Let us consider, What it is to take heed to ourselves.
I. See that the work of saving grace be thoroughly wrought in your own souls.  Take heed to yourselves, lest you be void of that saving grace of God which you offer to others, and be strangers to the effectual working of that gospel which you preach; and lest, while you proclaim to the world the necessity of a Saviour, your own hearts should neglect him, and you should miss of an interest in him and his saving benefits.
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0851511910, Paperback)

In his introduction, “Take heed therefore unto yourselves, and to all the flock, over which the Holy Ghost hath made you overseers, to feed the church of God, which he hath purchased with his own blood.” This charge from Acts 20:28 only is the beginning of a solemn and overarching task to be personally involved and disciple all of your congregants. Richard Baxter’s plea for shepherding his flock continues with a charge to pastors to verify their own spiritual walk and then walks them through various disciplines, strategies and goals to guide and instruct their congregation.

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:33:34 -0400)

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