HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Cardinals Blades by Pierre Pevel
Loading...

Cardinals Blades (edition 2009)

by Pierre Pevel

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
161674,103 (3.59)27
Member:JR.Raluces
Title:Cardinals Blades
Authors:Pierre Pevel
Info:Gollancz (2009), Edition: First UK, Hardcover, 384 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:**
Tags:Fantasy

Work details

The Cardinal's Blades by Pierre Pevel

Recently added byJR.Raluces, private library, max-rush, Dureo, masland, bell7, electrice, Smitie, larkquin
None

None.

Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 27 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 6 (next | show all)
One way to sumarize this one is ‘Imagine the kind of story that The Three Musketeers could have been in an alternate universe where dragons exist.’

This is the first book of a trilogy. The beginning is slow-paced as we meet all the protagonists then the action is taking off in the second part of the story but oh boy, when it starts, it’s so worth it. I’m looking forward the next one. ( )
  electrice | Feb 21, 2014 |
The Three Musketeers with dragons. Well, sort of dragons. Half-bloods. And the dragons, or some of them, want to gain a foothold in France. So Cardinal Richelieu reactivates his best group of spies, his Blades, who had been dismissed in disgrace 5 years ago.

But it’s clear Richelieu is holding back on the Blades, and they’re a bit less trusting after being betrayed by one of their own.

I really love the concept. The start is a bit slow, as there is too much getting the band back together, with cuts from one person to another as they all receive their summons back to the Blades.

Still, I’m eager to read the next book. ( )
  majkia | Feb 10, 2013 |
This book was a gift from my younger brother last Christmas, and is the first in a trilogy that my brother bought me based on the covers.....!

There has never been more truth to the old cliche of judging a book by its cover!

I really struggled with this book. It took way to long for me to get into. There was no flow to it, particularly at the beginning of the book. There were a lot of introductions to a lot of characters, without it connecting as such, and felt very matter of fact type style of writing rather than a story. The flow may have also been affected by the translation, as it was originally written in French.

I struggled to build any type of rapport, or associate with any character. I could not empathise or get on board with any of them initially.

The premise of the book is a good fantastic storyline, a twist on a classic of the musketeers which I have always enjoyed, however, Pierre Pevel fails in it's delivery for the majority of the book.

I gave this 2 and a half stars only for the last quarter of the book. I was willing to give it 1 star all the way through, until the last quarter finally entertained, things came together, characters developed and something actually happened. I was impressed by the end, which is somewhat annoying, as I was not going to read the second and third novels in the series, but the end left me intrigued and piquedmy interest in the follow on from the end of the first. I hope the second starts as the first finished!

The group the Cardinal Blades I could not help compare to other groups from other fantasy booksI have read, such as the series by James Barclay and the group the Raven, however, the Cardinal Blades do not compare to the Raven! The Cardinal Blades as a group I felt needed tobe further developed, the back story only coming to light towards the end, which offered a lot to the characters, which was missing from the majority of the book!

Now I've started the series, and the good ending, I'll continue with the series. I do hope they improve though!

Thanks ( )
  JR.Raluces | Nov 28, 2012 |
I started reading this book because of my childish nostalgia for [a:Alexandre Dumas|4785|Alexandre Dumas|http://photo.goodreads.com/authors/1279049943p2/4785.jpg] and his famous [b:The Three Musketeers|7190|The Three Musketeers|Alexandre Dumas|http://photo.goodreads.com/books/1320436982s/7190.jpg|1263212]. But Pevel disappointed me. I didn’t like his book at all.
Caveat: as I can’t read the original in French, I can only talk about the English translation of the novel, and it’s lousy, as if the translator has only a passing acquaintance with English grammar. Dangling participles litter every page, and pronouns referring to the wrong nouns mar almost every paragraph. I’m a grammar freak. Each time my eyes stumbled upon such mistakes, frustration built up. I felt jarred out of the story, disoriented.
The story itself is jumbled, built like a series of short vignettes, each one with its own POV. I couldn’t discern one distinctive protagonist or even three. I stopped counting POVs at a dozen, but I think there are more.
The genre of the novel is a political thriller with a nod to fantasy: there’re dragons somewhere in Spain and they, allegedly, threaten France. Cardinal Richelieu opposes the dragons and takes actions to prevent their dominance: he resurrects the company of his spies – Blades – to take care of the dragons’ threat.
The Blades are in the center of the novel, which is a tale of their coming together for their first mission. But the author adopted a puppet master attitude towards his characters: they’re his cardboard marionettes, and he shuffles them like cards, any way he chooses. Lots of page space is dedicated to descriptive details – the color of clothes, the lengths of hat plumes, the streets and architectural history of Paris – but the characters’ emotions are practically hidden, and very little of their thought process is revealed.
As the action jumps abruptly from character to character, the readers lack time to bond with any of them. In any case, no participant in this non-stop adventure is lovable or even likable. They are all two-dimensional, with an emphasis on cruelty. Everyone is bloodthirsty. Everyone kills without hesitation. Betrayal flourishes on every level.
And the leaders on both sides of the conflict are equally ruthless, manipulating their own people for the sake of political expediency. In these conditions, the traitors’ actions actually make more sense than those of the loyal supporters. If your leader or your comrades are as ready to destroy you as your enemies, then maybe money is the only thing of value and loyalty is worthless? Which makes the readers wonder: why should one side win against another? They’re both equally bad.
The only well-defined entity in the entire novel is France of the 17th century. After finishing the book, I got a sense of a barbaric country where brutality was norm, treachery abounded, human life cost nothing, and everyone was drowning in filth. The heroes were supposed to serve France, but she didn’t seem to deserve it. Maybe that was what Pevel wanted to show? If so, he’s a great writer.



( )
  olga_godim | Oct 4, 2012 |
Set in an alternate 17th century France where the lesser cousins of dragons fly the skies and Musketeers prowl the streets. Plots within plots abound as can be expected when Cardinal Richelieu is involved. He has been asked by an emissary from Spain to reform his Blade's (think The Three Musketeer's but only better) to locate a missing Marquis and needing to stay in Spain's good graces, he agrees. La Fargue, the captain of the Blades, re-assembles the team that was disbanded in disgrace 5 years previously and we are introduced to each of its members in turn. Once reformed, they are given the sketchy details of their mission and they realise that there is undoubtedly more that has been left unsaid and they will have to fill in the blanks on their own.

As this is the first book of a series there is quite a bit of scene setting to be done but this does not detract from the amount of action that this book contains. There is also plenty of intrigue as the plot unfolds and you're never quite sure of the allegiances of some of the characters involved. The wyverns and dragonets are underused but I get the feeling they will be more utilised as the series develops past this opening book. My only gripe with this story is that due to the ensemble cast it is quite easy to forget just who everyone is, especially nearer the beginning. The short chapters, often just a couple of pages, don't really help in this respect.

Overall though this is a pretty decent tale and the translation reads quite well. ( )
  AHS-Wolfy | Jun 18, 2011 |
Showing 1-5 of 6 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review

» Add other authors

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Pierre Pevelprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Clegg, TomTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Cooke, Jacqueline NassoDesignersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Sullivan, JonCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
Information from the French Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to the English one.
Ce livre est dédié à Jean-Philippe, mon frère trop tôt enfui.
First words
Long and high-ceilinged, the room was lined with elegantly gilded and bound books which shone with a russet gleam in the half-light of the candle flames.
Quotations
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Information from the French Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to the English one.
Original language

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

Book description
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0575084383, Paperback)

The Cardinal's Blades is part historical novel, part old-fashioned swashbuckling high-action adventure, and part classic fantasy. Pierre Pevel has woven some of the best-loved fantasy tropes - musketeer-style adventuring, daring swordsmen, political intrigue, non-stop action and dragons - into a stunning new fantasy series. Paris, 1633. Louis XIII reigns over France ...and Cardinal Richelieu governs the country. One of the most dangerous and most powerful men in Europe, Richelieu keeps a constant, sharp eye on the enemies of the Crown to avoid their assassination attempts, thwart their spies and avert their warmongering. But he's up against people who will stop at nothing to achieve their goals, even going so far as to forge alliances with France's oldest and deadliest enemies. Spain, and the Court of Dragons. The nobility keep tiny dragonnets as pets; royal couriers ride tame wyverns, and lethal man-shaped scaled dracs ropam the country. But the power rising from the Court of Dragons is anything but mundane; the Black Claw sect draws on dragons as they once were: ancient, terrible, utterly merciless ...and poised to move against France. Faced with the growing threat from Spain, Richelieu summons Captain la Fargue, an exceptional swordsman, devoted officer and brilliant leader. If he's to turn aside the Black Claw's schemes, La Fargue and his legenday company of swashbucklers and rogues must be persuaded to once again risk their lives, fortunes and reputations for Richelieu, and for France. It's the biggest challenge yet for The Cardinal's Blades - and they'll need to be sharp ...

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:51:35 -0400)

(see all 2 descriptions)

FANTASY. Paris, 1633. Louis XIII reigns over France ...and Cardinal Richelieu governs the country. One of the most dangerous and most powerful men in Europe, Richelieu keeps a constant, sharp eye on the enemies of the Crown to avoid their assassination attempts, thwart their spies and avert their warmongering. But he's up against people who will stop at nothing to achieve their goals, even going so far as to forge alliances with France's oldest and deadliest enemies. Spain, and the Court of Dragons. The nobility keep tiny dragonnets as pets; royal couriers ride tame wyverns, and lethal man-shaped scaled dracs ropam the country.The Black Claw sect draws on dragons as they once were: ancient, terrible, utterly merciless ...and poised to move against France. Faced with the growing threat from Spain, Richelieu summons Captain la Fargue, an exceptional swordsman, devoted officer and brilliant leader.… (more)

(summary from another edition)

» see all 2 descriptions

Quick Links

Swap Ebooks Audio
1 avail.
28 wanted
5 pay

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.59)
0.5
1 2
1.5
2 3
2.5 2
3 6
3.5 5
4 12
4.5 3
5 6

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

Help/FAQs | About | Privacy/Terms | Blog | Contact | LibraryThing.com | APIs | WikiThing | Common Knowledge | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | 91,601,768 books! | Top bar: Always visible