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No god but God : the origins, evolution, and…
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No god but God : the origins, evolution, and future of Islam (original 2005; edition 2005)

by Reza Aslan

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1,583287,276 (4.07)50
Examines the rituals and traditions of Islam, and discusses the revelation of Muhammad as Prophet and the subsequent uprising against him and the emergence of his successors.
Member:jxn
Title:No god but God : the origins, evolution, and future of Islam
Authors:Reza Aslan
Info:New York : Random House, c2005.
Collections:Your library, printbooks
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No god but God: The Origins, Evolution, and Future of Islam by Reza Aslan (2005)

Recently added byarborschool, tcjb, ralphpalm, private library, Exeter, GCMarshallJr., ReataGlen, dkaine

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Showing 1-5 of 27 (next | show all)
What a fantastic ending for a wonderful book that is definitely worth owning and rereading and referencing multiple times. I cannot praise this book highly enough. Everyone needs to read it particularly those were considering what's going on currently from a perspective of Islam versus other religions. There's no versus: we are all in this together. ( )
  FourFreedoms | May 17, 2019 |
What a fantastic ending for a wonderful book that is definitely worth owning and rereading and referencing multiple times. I cannot praise this book highly enough. Everyone needs to read it particularly those were considering what's going on currently from a perspective of Islam versus other religions. There's no versus: we are all in this together. ( )
  ShiraDest | Mar 6, 2019 |
This was a fascinating and informative read. I am an unabashed fan of Aslan's, and make no bones about it. That said, this was the first book of my book club, and a number of the members admitted they wondered about my choice of this book. They all agreed that they were very glad to have read it. On a side note, I am tickled pink to watch him explore different cults and sects on his show, "Believers." ( )
  ptkpepe98 | Mar 19, 2018 |
Kirkus Reviews (2010) calls No god but God "readable and illuminating." This book is half the pages of the author's adult book with the same title, but still offers a rare and lucid vision of early Islam from the inside, capped with a heartening (for many Westerners) contention that modern Muslim radicalism isn't on the rise but actually in its dying throes. Reviews also note that the author includes a significant amount of analysis of women in Islam.
  stinsann | May 23, 2016 |
Very informative ( )
  yvonne.sevignykaiser | Apr 2, 2016 |
Showing 1-5 of 27 (next | show all)
THESE are rough times for Islam. It is not simply that frictions have intensified lately between Muslims and followers of other faiths. There is trouble, and perhaps even greater trouble, brewing inside the Abode of Peace itself, the notional Islamic ummah or nation that comprises a fifth of humanity.

News reports reveal glimpses of such trouble -- for instance, in the form of flaring strife between Sunni and Shiite Muslims in places like Iraq and Pakistan. Yet the greater tensions, while similarly rooted in the distant past, are less visible to the wider world. The rapid expansion of literacy among Muslims in the past half-century, and of access to new means of communication in the last decade, have created a tremendous momentum for change. Furious debates rage on the Internet, for example, about issues like the true meaning of jihad, or how to interpret and apply Islamic law, or how Muslim minorities should engage with the societies they live in.
added by cpandmg | editNew York Times, Max Rodenbeck (May 29, 2005)
 
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Epigraph
In the name of God, the Compassionate, the Merciful
Dedication
Thank you. Mom and Dad, for never doubting me; Catherine Bell, for getting me started; Frank Conroy, for finding me; Daniel Menaker, for trusting me; Amanda Fortini, for fixing me; my teachers, for challenging me; and Ian Werrett, for absolutely everything else.
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In the arid, desolate basin of Mecca, surrounded on all sides by the bare mountains of the Arabian desert, stands a small, nondescript sanctuary that the ancient Arabs refer to as the Ka'ba: the Cube.
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