HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Afghan Dreams: Young Voices of Afghanistan…
Loading...

Afghan Dreams: Young Voices of Afghanistan (edition 2008)

by Tony O'Brien, Michael P. Sullivan

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
627191,731 (3.83)1
roethkegrrl's review
O’Brien and Sullivan’s Afghan Dreams: Young Voices of Afghanistan examines important current events and issues in Afghanistan. A literal picture book (i.e., photojournalism geared toward a young audience), Dreams captures the lives and hopes of contemporary Afghan children by documenting their life circumstances in photographs, accompanied by textual descriptions of their dreams and hopes. Many of these children have faced hardship, losing loved ones to war or struggling with hunger and poverty, so their stories help to illustrate the everyday impact of the war in Afghanistan. But Dreams, as the title suggests, is also about hope. Some of the children’s wishes are fanciful (a magic carpet), others realistic (an education), but that they can still imagine good things for themselves is no small feat.
The images in Dreams capture rural and urban settings, war-ravaged buildings and green farm fields, dirty tear-stained cheeks and hopeful grins. Different styles of clothing depict multiple cultural and ethnic contexts, and the various jobs performed by young workers are also illustrated. This diversity establishes contemporary Afghanistan as a rich and complex place, with real children who have real dreams and problems. The striking photography makes the stories immediate and relatable, rather than painting Afghanistan as far away and war-torn, defined solely by its otherness.
This American Library Association Notable Book for Children will be of interest to librarians who collect for children and to school librarians. Dreams lends itself well to discussions of contemporary Afghan life, cross-cultural comparison, current wartime issues, and the concept of dreams and aspirations. The economic hardship experienced by many of the book’s subjects would also invite discussion. Although the book is geared toward older children, young adult and adult readers are also likely to be moved by the images and stories. The book does not provide a great deal of historical or background information, however, so some readers may need some supplemental information on Afghan history and the current conflicts taking place there in order to grasp the full context; for this reason, Dreams may work best as part of a unit or series. ( )
  roethkegrrl | Mar 14, 2010 |
All member reviews
Showing 7 of 7
I enjoyed reading this book very much! My favorite thing about it was the layout style of each of the pages. The book was written almost like a magazine. Each person’s information was organized by name, age, occupation and dream. I feel like this layout allowed me to get to know each person. For example, Nasi is a 13-year-old girl. She studies math, music, and Dari (Persian language) in hopes to eventually become a singer or a teacher. In addition to the magazine layout style of the book I also really enjoyed the pictures. Each person was photographed and in some cases their homes and surroundings were also captured. The pictures were raw, and unedited. The photos showed their living conditions but my favorite part of the pictures was how their eyes popped and contrasted against the gray, and brown in the pictures. Finally the book pushes the reader to think about others and differences in cultures. For example, going to school was not an option for me. In my family school was my priority not work. In comparison, Nasir had to work to help support his family so he couldn’t go to school. However he still has hopes to become educated. I think the big idea/message of this book was to encourage everyone to have dreams and hopes. Despite their situations all of the teenagers still have hope that one day they will accomplish their dreams and goals.
  EmilyBeer | Sep 30, 2014 |
This book caught me, as a reader, from the very first page. It gives brief interview like biographies of a number of people from Afghanistan, and uses their real pictures. I enjoyed reading this story for a number of reasons, the first being that the use of real photography enhanced your understanding of that person. When Nasir said he worked in the dirt all day, it is easy to believe you understand until you see the boy in his natural habitat holding a splinted shovel and wearing a worn out Christmas shirt caked with dirt and smudges of mud. The author also focuses on each person’s face within the photography. It may show them as a whole, but it always shows a close up of their face. These close ups help readers to feel the emotions of these people, by simply looking into their eyes. Finally, within the actual writing the author chose to use an interview format, without including the questions. Making the entire story about these people and not about himself. He asked strong questions like what they hope to be in the future, but also silly questions like what their favorite animal was. These questions are what clued me in to the author’s main message that you can connect to any person, no matter their location or culture and that everyone hopes for the future. ( )
  ShelbyBurton | Sep 28, 2014 |
“Afghan Dreams” is a wonderful book about the children of Afghanistan. Every page of this book introduces a new child to the reader. Each child tells his/her story about what it is like living in Afghanistan and what there hopes and dreams are for the future. Some of the children even talk about wanting to make friends with children from other countries and showing them their favorite places and activities. The authors of this book did a really good job at sharing these children’s stories. The authors didn’t add their opinion to the stories, they just wrote the stories as the children told them to the authors. This book is a great book to read because it shows the hard life of children, but then it also shows their hopes and wishes for a better Afghanistan.
  brandib90 | Oct 24, 2013 |
See MSU meyer Library Review. ( )
  JoBass | Jul 5, 2010 |
O’Brien and Sullivan’s Afghan Dreams: Young Voices of Afghanistan examines important current events and issues in Afghanistan. A literal picture book (i.e., photojournalism geared toward a young audience), Dreams captures the lives and hopes of contemporary Afghan children by documenting their life circumstances in photographs, accompanied by textual descriptions of their dreams and hopes. Many of these children have faced hardship, losing loved ones to war or struggling with hunger and poverty, so their stories help to illustrate the everyday impact of the war in Afghanistan. But Dreams, as the title suggests, is also about hope. Some of the children’s wishes are fanciful (a magic carpet), others realistic (an education), but that they can still imagine good things for themselves is no small feat.
The images in Dreams capture rural and urban settings, war-ravaged buildings and green farm fields, dirty tear-stained cheeks and hopeful grins. Different styles of clothing depict multiple cultural and ethnic contexts, and the various jobs performed by young workers are also illustrated. This diversity establishes contemporary Afghanistan as a rich and complex place, with real children who have real dreams and problems. The striking photography makes the stories immediate and relatable, rather than painting Afghanistan as far away and war-torn, defined solely by its otherness.
This American Library Association Notable Book for Children will be of interest to librarians who collect for children and to school librarians. Dreams lends itself well to discussions of contemporary Afghan life, cross-cultural comparison, current wartime issues, and the concept of dreams and aspirations. The economic hardship experienced by many of the book’s subjects would also invite discussion. Although the book is geared toward older children, young adult and adult readers are also likely to be moved by the images and stories. The book does not provide a great deal of historical or background information, however, so some readers may need some supplemental information on Afghan history and the current conflicts taking place there in order to grasp the full context; for this reason, Dreams may work best as part of a unit or series. ( )
  roethkegrrl | Mar 14, 2010 |
Beautiful photos, meant-to-be-inspiring text. The organization of the book is awkward, and the average reader will not know whether or not any of the children's dreams are actually achievable. ( )
  Turrean | Aug 18, 2009 |
Afgahn Dreams is made up of photos and interviews with children and teens from Afghanistan. War has continually marched across Afghanistan's borders and many children go without the basic food and education that many American children take for granted. Tony O'Brien and Mike Sullivan traveled to Afghanistan and talked with children. Their overwhelming wish was for peace and education.

Though more factual information about Afghanistan would have made this a more complete book, it's an interesting glance into the lives of children across the world. The photographs are beautiful - some joyful and some haunting. I think this is a book that could truly inspire kids to learn more about Afghanistan and to do what they can to help. It would have been useful to have included some resources for those wishing to learn more or to help in some way.

I'd pair this one with In Our Village: Kambi ya Simba Through the Eyes of Its Youth and A School Like Mine for a multicultural unit or display. ( )
  abbylibrarian | Jan 14, 2009 |
Showing 7 of 7

Quick Links

Swap Ebooks Audio
3 wanted

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.83)
0.5
1
1.5
2 1
2.5
3 2
3.5
4 7
4.5
5 2

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

Help/FAQs | About | Privacy/Terms | Blog | Contact | LibraryThing.com | APIs | WikiThing | Common Knowledge | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | 93,325,759 books! | Top bar: Always visible