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Execution: The Discipline of Getting Things…
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Execution: The Discipline of Getting Things Done

by Larry Bossidy, Ram Charan (Author)

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Showing 1-5 of 9 (next | show all)
Larry Bossidy and Ram Charan have written a fine management book with “Execution” and I can't see why other reviewers find it lacking in usefulness. It's true that their systems require a good deal of uncomfortable frank talk between managers but the whole thing is really concerned with getting outside the comfort zone.

Strategy focuses firmly on the company's environment and competitor actions with the core being very open (non-political) decision making with clearly defined actions and a timetable with specific personal responsibilities.

I'm not a great fan of management books in general but I can recommend this one and it has similarities to one of my longtime favourites, Sam Walton's “Made in America” (bad title) and like him, they emphasise the personal touch and a high level of personal involvement.

A downside is the strange neo-liberal economic environment that these systems are designed to exploit (not really their fault they are an important part of it).

For example the idea that outsourcing may damage US industry/ skills and employment is completely absent as is concern with the influence of special interest (of which they are certainly one). Line workers also don't get a single mention.

Try the following quotes from the book:

P196 “Do we have people who know how to source? Do we have people who can run a supply chain that extends worldwide?”

P197 “The short and medium term milestones were to develop programs to move to low-cost manufacturing locations .”

P247 “We also had a program to promote sales of high tech globally, using China as a low cost supply base.”

P223 “You must continue to involve our lobbyist group to show congressional leaders the advantages of the product and dispel some of the current misconceptions.”

P250 “Or maybe you wanted to shut down a plant this year and transfer production to a lower cost country.”

Etc. etc. It's all in line with Jack Welch's 70/70/70 rule (70% of research and development should be outsourced, 70% of that should be outsourced offshore, 70% should be outsourced overseas and sent to India) = A tragedy of the commons, where the Commons is the non-shareholder/non-top executive part of the U.S.A. ( )
  Miro | Jan 31, 2015 |
Delegation is not enough. The thesis in this book: Execution is a discipline that needs to be explicit in the culture of an organization. The building blocks:
Know your people and your business, Insist on realism, Set clear goals and priorities, Follow through, Reward the doers, Expand people's capabilities, Know yourself. How to avoid being a micro-manager.
  kcannon | Oct 6, 2009 |
A must-have book for middle managers and C-levels on how to execute on their company goals and objectives.

http://smartlemming.com/2009/05/flatten-your-learning-curve-read-the-classic-bus... ( )
  SmartLemming | May 27, 2009 |
I included this book in my book: The 100 Best Business Books of All Time. www.100bestbiz.com. ( )
This review has been flagged by multiple users as abuse of the terms of service and is no longer displayed (show).
  toddsattersten | May 8, 2009 |
This book is not a detailed list of steps to take in order to ensure execution. However the first half of the book has a lot of very interesting and useful management ideas. Think "Good to Great" but from people who have been on the inside living it. The second half of the book focuses on strategic planning and operational planning, which I found less useful. ( )
  varroa | Feb 20, 2009 |
Showing 1-5 of 9 (next | show all)
Execution is "the missing link between aspirations and results," and as such, making it happen is the business leader's most important job. While failure in today's business environment is often attributed to other causes, Bossidy and Charan argue that the biggest obstacle to success is the absence of execution. They point out that without execution, breakthrough thinking on managing change breaks down, and they emphasize the fact that execution is a discipline to learn, not merely the tactical side of business.
 

» Add other authors (4 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Larry Bossidyprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Charan, RamAuthormain authorall editionsconfirmed
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Amazon.com Amazon.com Review (ISBN 0609610570, Hardcover)

Disciplines like strategy, leadership development, and innovation are the sexier aspects of being at the helm of a successful business; actually getting things done never seems quite as glamorous. But as Larry Bossidy and Ram Charan demonstrate in Execution, the ultimate difference between a company and its competitor is, in fact, the ability to execute.

Execution is "the missing link between aspirations and results," and as such, making it happen is the business leader's most important job. While failure in today's business environment is often attributed to other causes, Bossidy and Charan argue that the biggest obstacle to success is the absence of execution. They point out that without execution, breakthrough thinking on managing change breaks down, and they emphasize the fact that execution is a discipline to learn, not merely the tactical side of business. Supporting this with stories of the "execution difference" being won (EDS) and lost (Xerox and Lucent), the authors describe the building blocks--leaders with the right behaviors, a culture that rewards execution, and a reliable system for having the right people in the right jobs--that need to be in place to manage the three core business processes of people, strategy, and operations. Both Bossidy, CEO of Honeywell International, Inc., and Charan, advisor to corporate executives and author of such books as What the CEO Wants You to Know and Boards That Work, present experience-tested insight into how the smooth linking of these three processes can differentiate one company from the rest. Developing the discipline of execution isn't made out to be simple, nor is this book a quick, easy read. Bossidy and Charan do, however, offer good advice on a neglected topic, making Execution a smart business leader's guide to enacting success rather than permitting demise. --S. Ketchum

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:20:37 -0400)

(see all 3 descriptions)

An acclaimed CEO and an advisor to senior executives and boards of directors have pooled their knowledge and experience into one guide, in which they describe the importance of being deeply and passionately engaged in an organization, and why robust dialogues about people, strategy, and operations result in a business based on intellectual honesty and realism.… (more)

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