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The Diary of Samuel Pepys by Samuel Pepys
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The Diary of Samuel Pepys (1825)

by Samuel Pepys

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English (7)  Italian (1)  Dutch (1)  All languages (9)
Showing 1-5 of 7 (next | show all)
Having given up on finding an unabridged copy of the diary, I checked this out from the library. I enjoyed listening to it very much. Kenneth Branaugh's reading is engaging and his voice very pleasant. The selections from the diary were very interesting to me as I am interested in British history and maritime history. I did not know until I started listening that Pepys had such an important job regarding the Royal Navy. Hearing all the talk of masts and knees made me miss my college shipwreck archaeology class. Most of the diary is interesting for other reasons, though. Pepys's account of the Great Fire, for example, is so vivid that I could see it all in my mind's eye and feel the rising panic. And then there are all of the events surrounding King Charles II and the first Anglo-Dutch War, not to mention the Plague.... His personal affairs are just as interesting, particularly his dealings with his wife and various lovers. I felt so sorry for his wife as I listened and wished she had left diaries too, because I am sure her side of the story would be very interesting. For anyone who loves history and enjoys the weird little details that make up life, this is a must-read or must-listen. ( )
  aurelas | Dec 23, 2016 |
This is a must read for anyone interested in 17th century England and its place in the world. Though Pepys was at the center of power, he barely mentions America; England was too busy with the French, Dutch, and Spanish. Pepys is blunt and revealing; really fascinating. ( )
  prepper | Oct 19, 2015 |
Better than I thought it would be. Not the endless, wordy school-stuff of Dickens. Pepys was an interesting man in interesting times who thought very highly of himself and his financial and sexual prowess. ( )
  Petra.Xs | Apr 2, 2013 |
"[Pepys Diary] is, in truth, the greatest autobiography in our language, and yet it was not deliberately written as such. When Mr. Pepys jotted down from day to day every quaint or mean thought which came into his head he would have been very much surprised had any one told him that he was doing a work quite unique
in our literature. Yet his involuntary auto- biography, compiled for some obscure reason or for private reference, but certainly never meant for publication, is as much the first in that line of literature as Boswell's book among biographies or Gibbon's among histories." -- Through the Magic Door, p. 87
  ACDoyleLibrary | Jan 21, 2010 |
A great book which takes you back more than three centuries back, in the turbulent London of the Civil War & Restoration. There are a number of obscure—and sometimes uninteresting—passages where Pepys details his problems at work. But they are intermixed with everyday-life details which show that life in the 17c. wasn't so different from that in the present time (e.g. ordering and delivery of a new coach, supervision of the work done by carpenters at home, problems with the cesspool, where to stop over in town when you needed to pass a motion, &c.) The reading of this 3-volume selection of the Diary incites me to seriously consider the reading of the full 11-vol version... ( )
1 vote Pepys | Jul 30, 2007 |
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» Add other authors (113 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Samuel Pepysprimary authorall editionscalculated
Gallienne, Richard LeEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Wheatley, Henry B.Editorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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This is what is usually described as The Diary of Samuel Pepys, with no indication of completeness nor volume number. Use The Diary of Samuel Pepys: Condensed, The Diary of Samuel Pepys: Abridged, The Diary of Samuel Pepys: Complete Edition, etc. to try to distinguish the very many editions.
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0679642218, Hardcover)

The diary which Samuel Pepys kept from January 1660 to May 1669 ...is one of our greatest historical records and... a major work of English literature, writes the renowned historian Paul Johnson. A witness to the coronation of Charles II, the Great Plague of 1665, and the Great Fire of 1666, Pepys chronicled the events of his day. Originally written in a cryptic shorthand, Pepys's diary provides an astonishingly frank and diverting account of political intrigues and naval, church, and cultural affairs, as well as a quotidian journal of daily life in London during the Restoration.

In 1825, when Pepys's memoirs were first published, Francis Jeffrey of The Edinburgh Review declared, "We can scarcely say that we wish it a page shorter... it is very entertaining thus to be transported into the very heart of a time so long gone by; and to be admitted into the domestic intimacy, as well as the public councils of a man of great activity and circulation in the reign of Charles II." Edited and abridged by literary critic and author Richard Le Gallienne, this edition features an Introduction by Robert Louis Stevenson.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:01:57 -0400)

(see all 4 descriptions)

"The diary which Samuel Pepys kept from January 1660 to May 1669 ... is one of our greatest historical records and...a major work of English literature," writes the renowned historian Paul Johnson. A witness to the coronation of Charles II, the Great Plague of 1665, and the Great Fire of 1666, Pepys chronicled the events of his day. Originally written in a cryptic shorthand, Pepys's diary provides an astonishingly frank and diverting account of political intrigues and naval, church, and cultural affairs, as well as a quotidian journal of daily life in London during the Restoration."--BOOK JACKET.… (more)

» see all 4 descriptions

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HighBridge Audio

An edition of this book was published by HighBridge Audio.

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HighBridge

An edition of this book was published by HighBridge.

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