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Creating the Customer-Driven Academic Library (edition 2009)

by Jeannette Woodward

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434267,810 (3.75)None
Member:drriidurab
Title:Creating the Customer-Driven Academic Library
Authors:Jeannette Woodward
Info:Amer Library Assn Editions (2009), Paperback, 208 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:***
Tags:libraries, services

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Creating the Customer-Driven Academic Library by Jeannette Woodward

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My book review got WAY too long, sorry. I ended up putting it in my blog: http://www.sheldon-hess.org/coral/2012/11/book-review-creating-the-customer-driv...
  web_kunoichi | Jul 12, 2013 |
I give Jeannette Woodward five stars for the main message: academic libraries tend to operate as administrative bodies, service-oriented management is not their focus - with grave consequences. In a digital era, on-site-services need to be thoroughly reconsidered: awareness of changing needs, social change, service perception or staffing are key factors in developing an academic library into the 21st century .
Examples are U.S. oriented and argumentation gets a bit lengthy, but there is much value to be taken from this book. An eye-opener. ( )
  drriidurab | Nov 10, 2012 |
Woodward gave an excellent look at academic librarianship, as well as, our faults and praises. Every academic librarian should read this book. There are areas Woodward discusses where we can use some improvements for our library guests. ( )
  garets86 | Nov 19, 2010 |
Woodward concentrates on making the library a pleasant place with lots of professional assistance to visiting patrons. Little connections here to curriculum, instruction, collaboration or activism in teaching and learning. Not our cup of tea in an era when both school and academic librarians must reinvent themselves.
  davidloertscher | Nov 1, 2008 |
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0838909760, Paperback)

Academic libraries are going through what may be the most difficult period in their history. With more and more scholarly content available online and accessible almost anywhere, where does the traditional 'brick and mortar' library fit in?In this book, Jeannette Woodward attacks these and other pressing issues facing today's academic librarians. Her trailblazing strategies center on keeping the customer's point of view in focus at all times to help you: integrate technology to meet today's student and faculty needs; revaluate the role and function of library service desks; implement staffing strategies to match customer expectations; and, create new and effective promotional materials. Librarians are now faced with marketing to a generation of students who log on rather than walk in and this cutting edge book supplies the tools needed to keep customers coming through the door.

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:31:55 -0400)

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