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Diamond Star (Skolian Empire) by Catherine…
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Showing 1-5 of 9 (next | show all)
what do you call a space opera that's rock instead of opera? hmm...
I fell a little in love with Del, and also really enjoyed some of the side characters. the song lyrics were catchy and I'm intrigued to hear what they'd sound like performed. this book tugged at my heart strings and got me a little choked up at times. it also made me grin pretty fiercely at all of Del's triumphs. now I guess I'll have to read some of Asaro's other books. ;) ( )
  ElleyOtter | Nov 28, 2017 |
Amazon preorder,Amazon received
  romsfuulynn | Apr 28, 2013 |
Oh, Catherina Asaro, what have ye done.

I love the Skolian Saga because Asaro writes interesting space opera with actual science(!) in it and does a great job describing some of the physics going on with interesting space tricks. I like most of the characters in the universe, and I also like that she has a romance angle through the stories.

This book, judging by its cover (I know , I know) and the blurb about it, looked like it might not be so great. It's about one of the Ruby Dynasty scions, Del-Kurj Valdoria, son of Roca and Eldrinson. He gets left behind on earth when the rest of the family is rescued (he's on another continent), and he decides to hang out and go at a music career.

This book is incredibly slow and boring. There are entire swaths of the book I can't really remember and don't care about. I listened to it on audio book and if I missed several minutes because I got distracted, I didn't even bother to go back.

I hung in there for occasional Ruby family stuff, because even though Asaro's novels in the Skolian universe are largely stand-alone, there is information about the background war and politics of the empire that are good to stay up on.

This book feels like it was written, not by a physicist/author with a string of awesome books under her belt, by a groupie who dreams about a famous life - and it's full of references to the drinking/boozing/sexin' culture of the famous rocker with a side of commentary about what they think of the kind of people that populate the entertainment industry (producers, labels, mostly behaving badly and trying to choke the individuality and genius of the art and what not).

Del-Kurj plays like a young, self-centered idiot, going through this great learning process that just falls really, really flat (with a side of family conflict because no one! understands! him! or supports his genius, or whatever. Boring.)

I'm still looking forward to any books in the Skolian Saga that Asaro writes, assuming they're nothing like this book. If I had read this first in the series, I would have never continued with it, and if the next book is anything like this, I'll quit. ( )
  suzemo | Mar 31, 2013 |
Oh, Catherina Asaro, what have ye done.

I love the Skolian Saga because Asaro writes interesting space opera with actual science(!) in it and does a great job describing some of the physics going on with interesting space tricks. I like most of the characters in the universe, and I also like that she has a romance angle through the stories.

This book, judging by its cover (I know , I know) and the blurb about it, looked like it might not be so great. It's about one of the Ruby Dynasty scions, Del-Kurj Valdoria, son of Roca and Eldrinson. He gets left behind on earth when the rest of the family is rescued (he's on another continent), and he decides to hang out and go at a music career.

This book is incredibly slow and boring. There are entire swaths of the book I can't really remember and don't care about. I listened to it on audio book and if I missed several minutes because I got distracted, I didn't even bother to go back.

I hung in there for occasional Ruby family stuff, because even though Asaro's novels in the Skolian universe are largely stand-alone, there is information about the background war and politics of the empire that are good to stay up on.

This book feels like it was written, not by a physicist/author with a string of awesome books under her belt, by a groupie who dreams about a famous life - and it's full of references to the drinking/boozing/sexin' culture of the famous rocker with a side of commentary about what they think of the kind of people that populate the entertainment industry (producers, labels, mostly behaving badly and trying to choke the individuality and genius of the art and what not).

Del-Kurj plays like a young, self-centered idiot, going through this great learning process that just falls really, really flat (with a side of family conflict because no one! understands! him! or supports his genius, or whatever. Boring.)

I'm still looking forward to any books in the Skolian Saga that Asaro writes, assuming they're nothing like this book. If I had read this first in the series, I would have never continued with it, and if the next book is anything like this, I'll quit. ( )
  suzemo | Mar 31, 2013 |
With a lot of the Skolian Empire books, you can see the interactions between books, the way Asaro has woven the stories together - bits of Spherical Harmonic are seen from a different angle in Ascendant Sun, or Moon's Shadow. Not so with Diamond Star. It takes place within a couple of years of the Radiance War, after most of the Ruby Dynasty has been removed from Earth, and while they play a minor part towards the end, including the hidden nephew, this story disappears into the history without a ripple.

It's almost as if the author went down her list and thought, 'Oh, here's a Ruby I haven't written about'.

I have to admit, It's very well put together, enough so that I burned through it in one sitting, and I'm definitely going to look into getting the CD, but it doesn't add anything to the wider story. There's no resonance, as it were. ( )
  michaelbirks | May 16, 2011 |
Showing 1-5 of 9 (next | show all)
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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Catherine Asaroprimary authorall editionscalculated
Mattingly, David B.Cover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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To Hayin Ani
For bringing my story alive
With his music and his artistry
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Del was sick of being interrogated.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Rock singer Del, son of the Ruby Dynasty, undeniably had talent, and was rapidly rising from an unknown fringe artist to stardom. But, with his life entangled in the politics of three interstellar civilizations, whether he wanted that or not, talent might not be enough. And that factor might have much more effect than his music on the lives of trillions of people on the thousands of inhabited worlds across the galaxy.… (more)

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