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The Modern Italian Novel: From Pea to…
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The Modern Italian Novel: From Pea to Moravia (A Chicago Classic)

by Sergio Pacifici

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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0809308738, Hardcover)

The third and final part of a monumental series—the first history of the modern Italian novel to appear in English in more than forty years—this volume cov­ers writers from Pea to Moravia.

 

Volume three begins with an exami­nation of three writers, Enrico Pea, Bruno Cicognani, and Aldo Palazzeschi, who moved toward the novel from auto­biographical, regionalistic, or semi­fabulist positions. Three fine artists, Corrado Alvaro, Vitaliano Brancati, and Giuseppe Tomasi di Lampedusa, are discussed as representatives of what may appropriately be called the Southern novel. Dino Buzzati, one of the few Gothic novelists Italy has produced, and Carlo Levi, a major intellectual and au­thor of a nonnovel work, are examined next, followed by an analysis of the main work of Carlo Emilio Gadda, the Italian Joyce. Three long essays, on Cesare Pavese, Elio Vittorini, and the cele­brated Alberto Moravia, round out the book.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:21:34 -0400)

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