HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Massacre at the Champ de Mars (Royal…
Loading...

Massacre at the Champ de Mars (Royal Historical Society Studies in History…

by David Andress

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations
4None1,664,912NoneNone

None.

None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

No reviews
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

Book description
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0861932471, Hardcover)

On 17 July 1791 the revolutionary National Guard of Paris opened fire on a crowd of protesters: citizens believing themselves patriots trying to save France from the reinstatement of a traitor king. To the National Guard and their political superiors the protesters were the dregs of the people, brigands paid by counter-revolutionary aristocrats. Politicians and journalists declared the National Guard the patriots, and their action a heroic defence of the fledgling Constitution. Under the Jacobin Republic of 1793, however, this 'massacre' was regarded as a high crime, a moment of truth in which a corrupt elite exposed its treasonable designs. This detailed study of the events of July 1791 and their antecedents seeks to understand how Parisians of different classes understood 'patriotism', and how it was that their different answers drove them to confront each other on the Champ de Mars.DAVID ANDRESS is senior lecturer in Modern European History, University of Portsmouth. Who was a member of the revolutionary people? And who were its enemies? How could one tell them apart? The contradictory answers to such questions would lead 'patriotic' citizen-soldiers to shoot down patriot protesters in Paris on 17 July 1791. This book explores why and how such a conflict arose, in a city aflame with political opinions, and beset by aristocratic 'dangerous' unemployed. Political unanimity was one of the great goals of the French Revolution; this study illustrates why it was so hard to achieve.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:16:08 -0400)

On 17 July 1791 the revolutionary National Guard of Paris opened fire on a crowd of protesters: citizens believing themselves patriots trying to save France from the reinstatement of a traitor king. To the National Guard and their political superiors the protesters were the dregs of the people, brigands paid by counter-revolutionary aristocrats. Politicians and journalists declared the National Guard the patriots, and their action a heroic defence of the fledgling Constitution.… (more)

Quick Links

Swap Ebooks Audio
1 wanted

Popular covers

Rating

Average: No ratings.

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

You are using the new servers! | About | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 117,144,154 books! | Top bar: Always visible