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Politics of Human Rights in Southeast Asia…
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Politics of Human Rights in Southeast Asia (Politics in Asia)

by Philip J. Eldridge

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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0415214297, Hardcover)

The divide between the West and Southeast Asia seems to be nowhere more apparent than in debates about human rights. Within these diverse geographical, political and cultural climates, human rights seem to have become relative, and the quest for absolutes seems unattainable. In this new book Philip J Eldridge seeks to question this stalemate. He argues that the Association of Southeast Asian Nations' inclusion in United Nations' human rights treaties could be the common ground that bridges the gap between East and West. Eldridge uses topical case studies and primary research from Malaysia, Indonesia, East Timor and Australia, to compare the effectiveness of United Nations' human rights directives on local democracies. This study presents insightful research into a hotly debated topic. As such it will be a thought-provoking resource for students of human rights, politics and international relations.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:19:18 -0400)

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