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The Appointment by Herta Müller
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The Appointment (1997)

by Herta Müller

Other authors: See the other authors section.

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» See also 65 mentions

English (14)  Dutch (2)  Swedish (1)  German (1)  Piratical (1)  Danish (1)  All languages (20)
Showing 1-5 of 14 (next | show all)
[The Appointment] was one of the works taken into consideration when [[Herta Muller]] was given the Nobel Prize in 2009. Muller was born in Romania in 1953 and emigrated to Germany in 1987. Her work, including [The Appointment] deals with life in Romania under communist rule.

In many ways this book reminds me of other works of German literature in that there is very little (almost no) plot. The entire story takes place during a 90 minute tram ride the main character takes from her home to her appointment with a secret police officer for interrogation and consists of her mental wanderings through her recent life. The book is difficult to read because the life it described is numbingly difficult and dreary but also because the story moves so slowly and doesn't go much of any where. I think, though, that it is one of the book's strengths because it causes the reader to get more of a sense of the emotional state of the characters than a more vivid description would. In the end the main character concludes "The trick is not to go mad" and I could really understand that she would feel that way. ( )
  RebaRelishesReading | Sep 26, 2013 |
So far, so terrifying.
Update: I've decided not to finish this one. It's too slow for me and the subject matter is too depressing. Apologies to the Nobel committee. ( )
  mjennings26 | Apr 3, 2013 |
"The narrator however is not having a good time and the prose serves to heighten your fear for her because within those tight phrases is the story of a woman who is doing anything, anything she can to keep sane. "
read more:http://likeiamfeasting.blogspot.com/2012/12/the-appointment-herta-muller.html ( )
  mongoosenamedt | Dec 4, 2012 |
Like all Muller’s books, this is grim but well worth reading. A woman in Ceaucescu's Romania is summoned, not for the first time, to a meeting with a secret policeman. The whole novel takes place in her head as she travels to the appointment on the tram. Her previous husband and family history, her current husband's descent into alcoholism, the death of her friends and the madness of so many people around her are all gradually brought into focus. The great strength of the book is that it makes her appointment seem not to be the worst of life in that place - the society she lives in is so poisoned that almost everybody is suffering just as badly as she is, albeit in different ways. It's not one I rushed to pick up again, but as an effective portrait of a time and place, it's hard to beat. I wish my German was up to reading the original. ( )
  roblong | Jan 31, 2012 |
I should say at the outset that I do not like stream of consciousness prose masquerading as a novel. I found this novel boring, and the less said about the ending the better. Yet the book has attracted many eloquent statements, the result of which was to make me wish that they had written the book rather than Ms. Muller since I could find no evidence of any such profound meaning within the book, still less any pyschological tension or excitement. ( )
  bhowell | Sep 11, 2011 |
Showing 1-5 of 14 (next | show all)
The narrator's isolation and the numbing way in which she walks through life while wondering, ''Does any of this really mean anything, or is it just there for you to wonder about,'' mean ''The Appointment'' is more a test of endurance than a pleasure. One could argue that this is precisely the point, given the duress and despair Müller seeks to capture, but duress in and of itself does not make a novel.
 

» Add other authors (7 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Müller, Hertaprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Löfdahl, KarinTranslatormain authorsome editionsconfirmed
Oliveira, Claire deTranslatormain authorsome editionsconfirmed
Boehm, PhilipTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Hengel, Ria vanTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Hulse, MichaelTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Ich bin bestellt.
I've been summoned. (English translation)
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Original title: Heute wär ich mir lieber nicht begegnet
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0312420544, Paperback)

WINNER OF THE 2009 NOBEL PRIZE IN LITERATURE

 
From the winner of the IMPAC Award, a fierce novel about a young Romanian woman's discovery of betrayal in the most intimate reaches of her life

"I've been summoned. Thursday, ten sharp." Thus begins one day in the life of a young clothing-factory worker during Ceaucescu's totalitarian regime. She has been questioned before; this time, she believes, will be worse. Her crime? Sewing notes into the linings of men's suits bound for Italy. "Marry me," the notes say, with her name and address. Anything to get out of the country.

As she rides the tram to her interrogation, her thoughts stray to her friend Lilli, shot trying to flee to Hungary, to her grandparents, deported after her first husband informed on them, to Major Albu, her interrogator, who begins each session with a wet kiss on her fingers, and to Paul, her lover, her one source of trust, despite his constant drunkenness. In her distraction, she misses her stop to find herself on an unfamiliar street. And what she discovers there makes her fear of the appointment pale by comparison.

Herta Müller pitilessly renders the humiliating terrors of a crushing regime. Bone-spare and intense, The Appointment confirms her standing as one of Europe's greatest writers.

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:28:12 -0400)

(see all 3 descriptions)

"I've been summoned. Thursday, ten sharp." Thus begins one day in the life of a young clothing-factory worker during Ceaucescu's totalitarian regime. She has been questioned before; this time, she believes, will be worse. Her crime? Sewing notes into the linings of men's suits bound for Italy. "Marry me," the notes say, with her name and address. Anything to get out of the country. As she rides the tram to her interrogation, her thoughts stray to her friend Lilli, shot trying to flee to Hungary, to her grandparents, deported after her first husband informed on them, to Major Albu, her interrogator, who begins each session with a wet kiss on her fingers, and to Paul, her lover, her one source of trust, despite his constant drunkenness. In her distraction, she misses her stop to find herself on an unfamiliar street. And what she discovers there makes her fear of the appointment pale by comparison.… (more)

» see all 5 descriptions

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