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Amandine by Adele Griffin
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Amandine (edition 2003)

by Adele Griffin

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865140,249 (3)6
Member:sedelia
Title:Amandine
Authors:Adele Griffin
Info:Hyperion (2003), Edition: 1st Hyperi, Paperback
Collections:Read but unowned
Rating:**
Tags:2013

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Amandine by Adele Griffin

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Showing 5 of 5
You can read this review and more like it at Pretty Deadly Reviews.

I was a huge fan of Adele Griffin's Tighter and so when I saw a title of hers on NetGalley I knew I had to snatch it up. Adele's writing is very dark, tackling heavy issues always, but without exploiting them, or turning them into some freak show. This can be said about Amandine but I did feel like it was lacking in a few areas.

On the surface, Amandine is one hell of a story. Delia, a loner who has moved quite a few times in her childhood, further and further from New York City each time, is just starting high school when the book begins. She makes a friend in her first week, eccentric and strange Amandine, who wears a new costume every day - a lab coat, a flamenco dancer, an Old Hollywood starlet, you name it, she's worn it. At first, Amandine is wonderful, a totally new and shiny experience for Delia. Amandine is charming, a ballet dancer, a lover of opera. She woos Delia's parents easily. But under the surface, Delia can sense an darkness in Amandine that is only intensified the longer she is exposed to her. Soon after the two meet, Amandine builds a web of lies surrounding herself and finally the whole thing crescendos and explodes - and nearly everyone around the girls is hurt in the aftermath.

Delia was a very interesting character, even though I'm not her biggest fan. She stands out amongst today's YA protagonists: she's overweight, a real loner, with some dark secrets of her own. She is quite the unreliable narrator, and the entire time I wasn't really sure if I could believe her or not. I'll let you read the book yourselves and decide on your own.

Now, the real reason I rated this two stars is because I felt that it was underdeveloped. Amandine was really short - according to my Nook, it was only 95 pages, which means it's probably somewhere around 200 pages in print. Because of how short it was I thought there was a lot lacking. I know I said Amandine was intense, but I never really felt it escalate and take over the entire book. The mood of the story was very bland and the narrative almost clinical.

I also felt that it was written a little young. There was so much potential in the story of a girl who was obviously troubled and surrounded herself in a cocoon of lies. There were small hints that the grotesque mind of Amandine, but not enough to really impact the reader. I felt that Griffin had a lot of room to really push the limits with this one, and let all the goriness and grit show.

So, in all, I was pretty disappointed with this one. The story itself is very Griffin - dark and gritty with an unreliable narrator and a very thin line between perception and reality. But the writing was lacking, and I felt that the story and the characters were tragically underdeveloped. If you're looking for something along these lines, though, I would definitely recommend her newer works, Tighter and All You Never Wanted. ( )
  PrettyDeadly | Mar 31, 2013 |
I was a huge fan of Adele Griffin's Tighter and so when I saw a title of hers on NetGalley I knew I had to snatch it up. Adele's writing is very dark, tackling heavy issues always, but without exploiting them, or turning them into some freak show. This can be said about Amandine but I did feel like it was lacking in a few areas.

On the surface, Amandine is one hell of a story. Delia, a loner who has moved quite a few times in her childhood, further and further from New York City each time, is just starting high school when the book begins. She makes a friend in her first week, eccentric and strange Amandine, who wears a new costume every day - a lab coat, a flamenco dancer, an Old Hollywood starlet, you name it, she's worn it. At first, Amandine is wonderful, a totally new and shiny experience for Delia. Amandine is charming, a ballet dancer, a lover of opera. She woos Delia's parents easily. But under the surface, Delia can sense an darkness in Amandine that is only intensified the longer she is exposed to her. Soon after the two meet, Amandine builds a web of lies surrounding herself and finally the whole thing crescendos and explodes - and nearly everyone around the girls is hurt in the aftermath.

Delia was a very interesting character, even though I'm not her biggest fan. She stands out amongst today's YA protagonists: she's overweight, a real loner, with some dark secrets of her own. She is quite the unreliable narrator, and the entire time I wasn't really sure if I could believe her or not. I'll let you read the book yourselves and decide on your own.

Now, the real reason I rated this two stars is because I felt that it was underdeveloped. Amandine was really short - according to my Nook, it was only 95 pages, which means it's probably somewhere around 200 pages in print. Because of how short it was I thought there was a lot lacking. I know I said Amandine was intense, but I never really felt it escalate and take over the entire book. The mood of the story was very bland and the narrative almost clinical.

I also felt that it was written a little young. There was so much potential in the story of a girl who was obviously troubled and surrounded herself in a cocoon of lies. There were small hints that the grotesque mind of Amandine, but not enough to really impact the reader. I felt that Griffin had a lot of room to really push the limits with this one, and let all the goriness and grit show.

So, in all, I was pretty disappointed with this one. The story itself is very Griffin - dark and gritty with an unreliable narrator and a very thin line between perception and reality. But the writing was lacking, and I felt that the story and the characters were tragically underdeveloped. If you're looking for something along these lines, though, I would definitely recommend her newer works, Tighter and All You Never Wanted. ( )
  PrettyDeadly | Mar 31, 2013 |
in a sentence: Lonely Delia moves with her loving parents to a new town, again, and on her desperate search for a friend is picked up by the dramatic Amandine whose friendship goes from weird, to worse.

This novel is slathered with anxiety and the overwhelming feeling of discomfort through and through. Delia is awkward, overweight, and self-conscious. She is noticed by the overly confident, underweight, and bizarre Amandine. Perhaps it's her desperation to find a friend, or that Delia is just intrigued by Amandines 'stage presence' that she allows their friendship to continue despite red flags all over the place. The reader feels for Delia and her frustrations. She has great parents, they just lack a little in the compassion and understanding department. No matter how great her life may be at home, her relationship with Amandine is rocky and unhealthy, and a total thrill ride for her and for the reader.

I am still in awe of how Adele Griffin was able to completely capture the angst of Delia in a caring and real way. The young adult reader in me feels for Delia, while the adult reader feels bad for Delia. The line is thin, and is walked very well. Amandine's character is outrageous, but believable in context of a teenage girl with social issues. This was an incredibly quick read, and the fact that it's hard to put down makes it that much quicker. The young adult reader within me was completely absorbed in the subtle drama and tense emotions from all of the characters. The dialogue reflects the angst in Delia, and the reader is always guessing as to what is going to happen, when the turning point is, etc. ( )
  lisaisbusynerding | Dec 27, 2008 |
One of those disturbing tales about the darker side of teen friendships. A charismatic but emotionally unstable girl weaves a web of deception around her naive and trusting new friend. ( )
  airdna | Sep 11, 2007 |
I read this book in one sitting at my school's library years ago, and I loved it! A very good book with a very good message. ( )
  Heather19 | Sep 7, 2007 |
Showing 5 of 5
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0786814411, Paperback)

From the first moment of their meeting, Delia Blaine is fascinated by Amandine, who never fails to astonish with her bold, thrilling antics. As the games Amandine invents and the lies she tells become cruel and disturbing, Delia begins to fear her new friend. But breaking away from Amandine comes at a cost much greater than Delia ever could have imagined.

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:25:27 -0400)

(see all 3 descriptions)

Her first week at a new school, shy, plain Delia befriends Amandine, not anticipating the dangerous turns their friendship would take.

(summary from another edition)

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