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Owen Fiddler by Marvin D. Wilson
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Owen Fiddler (edition 2008)

by Marvin D. Wilson

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Member:sagustocox
Title:Owen Fiddler
Authors:Marvin D. Wilson
Info:Write Words, Inc. (2008), Paperback, 212 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:****
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Owen Fiddler by D Marvin Wilson

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Owen Fiddler is an "everyman," and this morality tale forces you to take a good look inside yourself. Am I really better than Owen Fiddler? Have I ever treated myself or someone else badly? Have I ever told someone, "If you hadn't done this, then I wouldn't have done that?" God doesn't view some sins as more acceptable than others; they're all terrible, and they all prevent us from accepting the love and forgiveness He offers each and every one of us.

I liked Marvin’s straightforward writing style, and at only 205 pages, he packs a punch without saying too much. The scenes involving Owen’s daughter, Frenda, and Kris (or Jesus Christ) had a magical, sensual quality to them, and while this vision of heaven isn’t what I expected, it certainly didn’t take away from my enjoyment of the book.

Full review on Diary of an Eccentric. ( )
  annaeccentric | Jul 17, 2009 |
Marvin Wilson's morality tale Owen Fiddler chronicles the bad behavior of one man--Owen--from his early years as a boy through adulthood and how his life spirals out of control. He meets his wife Jewel and they have a daughterFrenda, who becomes the light of Owen's life. Frenda is Owen's foil in this tale.

Owen is a womanizer, a drunkard, a liar, and behaves horribly toward his mother, stepfather, and brother. When the reader thinks nothing can get worse for Owen, it does. Not once throughout the novel does Owen take responsibility for his actions or the consequences. There is always someone else to blame--his brotherPaize, his stepfather, his friends, and others.

Not only is Owen an unlikeable character, but the author introduces us to a cast of unique characters, including Lou Seiffer (Lucifer) who is a truck driver that lends Owen money and Kris (Jesus Christ). The reader will have a hard time rooting for Owen to get a brain and evolve, but his daughterFrenda makes the reader want Owen to improve at least for his daughter's sake, if not his own. The novel is fast-paced weaving in and out of the past to tell Owen's story and that of his family, but in some sections the author's thoughts on the subject are interjected rather than allowing the characters' thoughts and feelings take center stage (see page 143)

Flat-footed just a couple of inches taller than Frenda. With her heels on, she stood a little taller than he did. His male ego was being spanked a wee tad. She could sense this, also sensed he was too proud to say anything about it. . . . Men. . .so tough on the outside and yet so easily bruised on the inside.

Although Frenda would care about how her date, Robert, felt while she was wearing heels, the earlier character buildup for Frenda does not support the sort of sarcastic statement about males being tough on the outside and easily bruised on the inside.

On page 119:

Cigarette tasted nasty. He snuffed it out amongst the dozens of other butts in the ashtray. Dim lights, cheap plastic checkerboard table coverings, the sights and sounds surrounding him: the working class indebted proletariat, his colleagues in misery. . .it all cast a gloom over him.

The above passage does have some great description to place the reader in the scene with Owen, and the reader can smell and taste what surrounds him, but in the same moment, it seems the author enters the scene. Uneducated Owen is not likely to know the term "proletariat" unless he's been educating himself in between his romps in the hay and nights on thebarstool . There are a number of these passages that can distract the reader, but there also are some great descriptive passages that capture the reader's attention. Check out page 24:

An officer, a sullen five foot ten stocky bad omen, called out to her from the front lawn, "Mrs. Fiddler?"

Marvin Wilson tells a story of one man, an everyman, and his descent into oblivion and the perilous journey that leads to his salvation. Readers looking at today's society and how it has deteriorated can take away a lesson from this book. It is not only an evolution of Owen Fiddler, but can become an evolution of readers and others in today's me-first society. I applaud Wilson's efforts to espouse change. Christians could find fault with some of the scenes near the end of the book, though readers should cast aside their indoctrination and take from this book its overall message--forgiveness, change, and selflessness are important to reforming ourselves and society. ( )
  sagustocox | Dec 7, 2008 |
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