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Fables of Aesop : A new translation by Aesop
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Fables of Aesop : A new translation (edition 1954)

by Aesop, Stanley Alexander Handford (Translator), Brian Robb (Illustrator)

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5,354771,209 (3.83)208
Member:w.h.auden
Title:Fables of Aesop : A new translation
Authors:Aesop
Other authors:Stanley Alexander Handford (Translator), Brian Robb (Illustrator)
Info:Penguin Books (1954), Paperback
Collections:Your library
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Fables of Aesop by Aesop

  1. 60
    The Arabian Nights: Tales of 1001 Nights Giftset by Robert Irwin (TineOliver)
    TineOliver: Any selection (or the complete set) of the tales from the Arabian Nights would be a good complement to Aesop's fables. Although the tales from the nights are much longer and more detailed, they also contain moralistic stories, however these are based on Arabic traditions.… (more)
  2. 51
    Pushkin's fairy tales by Aleksandr Sergeevich Pushkin (Voracious_Reader)
    Voracious_Reader: Allegory and fables.
  3. 20
    On the shortness of life by Seneca (BeeQuiet)
    BeeQuiet: Though unsuitable for youngsters due to its basis in letter form as opposed to short fables, this is good for people wanting a different outlook on life. It can encourage tolerance to your own misfortune and an appreciation of other's.
  4. 00
    Fables by Phaedrus (Anonymous user)
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» See also 208 mentions

English (69)  Spanish (5)  French (1)  All languages (75)
Showing 1-5 of 69 (next | show all)
This is an enjoyable, quick (under three hours) reading of all of Aesop's fables. There are a few where I thought that this must not be the same translation I read as a kid, but that was a long time ago, and I don't read Greek, so who am I to argue? Regardless, it's well done and worth a listen.
  LisCarey | Sep 19, 2018 |
This book sure is gorgeous to look at, but the fables themselves are pretty dry. ( )
  AngelClaw | Sep 8, 2018 |
Some are better than others. All are interesting. When you consider how old they are and how they are still referred to today, it’s pretty amazing! ( )
  melanieklo | Jul 25, 2018 |
A cute collection of morality stories/fables collected into this volume. I have read it so many times--as an adult, as a kid, as a teen--and each time I take something different away from it. I love it.

In fact, I took a tattoo idea from the Tortise and the Hare fable, and added to it my desire to travel, and voila! Two different ways to travel, but in my case, there isn't necessarily a correct one. ( )
  m_mozeleski | May 14, 2018 |
This is a collection of fables that run back to around 620-560 BC. Each of the short stories from within this book can be used within the classroom in how students perceive and understand fables. It can also be used for different literacy instructional methods. ( )
  carriganchambers | Apr 22, 2018 |
Showing 1-5 of 69 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors (195 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Aesopprimary authorall editionscalculated
Ashliman, D. L.Introductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Chesterton, G. K.Forewordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Detmold, Edward JuliusIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Feldhūns, ĀbramsTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Gasparovs, MihailsAfterwordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Handford, S. A.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Holder, HediIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Holzberg, NiklasEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Kredel, FritzIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Phaedrussecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Plummer, W. KirtmanIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Purmale, MaijaIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Rackham, ArthurIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Robb, BrianIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Singer, Isaac BashevisIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Temple, OliviaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Temple, RobertTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Tenniel, JohnIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Tinkelman, MurrayIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Townsend, George FylerTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Vernon Jones, V. S.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Voskuhl, ThomasEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Epigraph
So the tales were told age before Aesop;  and asses under lions' manes roared in Hebrew;  and sly foes flattered in Etruscan; and wolves in sheep's clothing gnashed their teeth in Sanskrit, no doubt. - Thackeray, The Newcomes
Dedication
First words
A half-starved fox, who saw in the hollow of an oak-tree some bread and meat left there by shepherds, crept in and ate it.
--Handford translation (1964)
A WOLF, meeting with a Lamb astray from the fold, resolved not to lay violent hands on him, but to find some plea to justify to the Lamb the Wolf's right to eat him.
A cock was once strutting up and down the farmyard among the hens when suddenly he espied something shining amid the straw. - 1966 Schocken edition.
A hungry fox saw some fine bunches of grapes hanging from a vine that was trained along a high trellis and did his best to reach them by jumping as high as he could into the air.
Popular stories of one sort and another have existed in every place and age; and since primitive man has usually lived in close contact with wild and domestic animals, it was natural for him to invent stories describing imaginary adventures of animals and to make them act and speak with motives and emotions proper to human beings.
--Handford translation (1964)
Quotations
Destroy the seed of evil, or it will grow up to your ruin.
Necessity is the mother of invention.
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Disambiguation notice
Please note that this entry should be reserved for complete and unabridged collections of Aesop's fables only. (Please see Book Description for details!). Don't combine with retellings or volumes containing selected fables only!
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Wikipedia in English (4)

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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 159308062X, Paperback)

Aesop's Fables, by Aesop, is part of the Barnes & Noble Classics series, which offers quality editions at affordable prices to the student and the general reader, including new scholarship, thoughtful design, and pages of carefully crafted extras. Here are some of the remarkable features of Barnes & Noble Classics:
All editions are beautifully designed and are printed to superior specifications; some include illustrations of historical interest. Barnes & Noble Classics pulls together a constellation of influences—biographical, historical, and literary—to enrich each reader's understanding of these enduring works.
 
As legend has it, the storyteller Aesop was a slave who lived in ancient Greece during the sixth century B.C. His memorable, recountable fables have brought amusing characters to life and driven home thought-provoking morals for generations of listeners and modern-day readers. Translated into countless languages and familiar to people around the world, Aesop’s fables never tarnish despite being told again and again.

This collection presents nearly 300 of Aesop’s most entertaining and enduring stories—from “The Hare and the Tortoise” and “The Town Mouse and the Country Mouse” to “The Goose That Laid the Golden Eggs” and “The Wolf in Sheep’s Clothing.” Populated by a colorful array of animal characters who personify every imaginable human type—from fiddling grasshoppers and diligent ants to sly foxes, wicked wolves, brave mice, and grateful lions—these timeless tales are as fresh and relevant today as when they were first created.

Full of humor, insight, and wit, the tales in Aesop’s Fables champion the value of hard work and perseverance, compassion for others, and honesty. They are age-old wisdom in a delicious form, for the consumption of adults and children alike.

D. L. Ashliman is emeritus professor at the University of Pittsburgh. He taught folklore, mythology, German, and comparative literature at that institution for thirty-one years. He has also served as guest professor at the University of Augsburg in Germany.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:01:06 -0400)

(see all 9 descriptions)

The story goes that a sow who had delivered a whole litter of piglets loudly accosted a lioness. "How many children do you breed?" asked the sow. "I breed only one," said the lioness, "but he is very well bred!"' The fables of Aesop have become one of the most enduring traditions of European culture, ever since they were first written down nearly two millennia ago. Aesop was reputedly a tongue-tied slave who miraculously received the power of speech; from his legendary storytelling came the collections of prose and verse fables scattered throughout Greek and Roman literature. First published in English by Caxton in 1484, the fables and their morals continue to charm modern readers: who does not know the stories of the tortoise and the hare, and the boy who cried wolf? This new translation is the first to represent all the main fable collections in ancient Latin and Greek, arranged according to the fables' contents and themes. It includes 600 fables, many of which come from sources never before translated into English.… (more)

(summary from another edition)

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Penguin Australia

4 editions of this book were published by Penguin Australia.

Editions: 0140446494, 0451529537, 0140369848, 0141345241

Tantor Media

An edition of this book was published by Tantor Media.

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