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Elizabeth Costello by J. M. Coetzee
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Elizabeth Costello (original 2003; edition 2003)

by J. M. Coetzee (Author)

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2,320434,794 (3.39)154
Elizabeth Costello is a distinguished and aging Australian novelist whose life is revealed through a series of eight formal addresses. From an award-acceptance speech at a New England liberal arts college to a lecture on evil in Amsterdam and a sexually charged reading by the poet Robert Duncan, the author draws the reader toward its astonishing conclusion. The novel is, on its surface, the story of a woman's life as mother, sister, lover, and writer. Yet it is also a profound and haunting meditation on the nature of storytelling.… (more)
Member:silkwall
Title:Elizabeth Costello
Authors:J. M. Coetzee (Author)
Info:Viking (2003), Edition: (2nd), 230 pages
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Elizabeth Costello by J. M. Coetzee (2003)

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» See also 154 mentions

English (35)  Dutch (2)  Swedish (2)  French (2)  Italian (1)  Spanish (1)  All languages (43)
Showing 1-5 of 35 (next | show all)
A series of topics presented in the form of reminiscences and musings of Coetzee’s fictional writer of fiction, Elizabeth Costello. I was particularly struck by The Lives of Animals and The Problem of Evil. This is the kind of fiction that is far more than entertainment. ( )
  Misprint | Aug 31, 2020 |
Phenomenal writing. An exploration of meaning in life through various philosophies and belief systems presented as a series of events in the life of fictional writer Elizabeth Costello. The text feels very autobiographical at times. Each chapter gives insight into a way of thinking that combines philosophy and religious belief. ( )
  ephemeral_future | Aug 20, 2020 |
I didn't like this book at all when I first read it, but it grew on me. ( )
  ralphpalm | Nov 11, 2019 |
My first Coetzee - I enjoyed it. I had Lindsay Stern's 'The Study of Animal Languages' in my hand to read, but the acknowledgments mention the book was inspired by 'Elizabeth Costello' so I had to run to read it first. 'Elizabeth Costello' had been on my very...very... very huge TBR "pile" anyway. The format is interesting - many formal addresses mostly given by Elizabeth Costello and then sometimes dinner party settings for discussions of those speeches. I feel like this book had much nuance that I probably wasn't catching, so it is tough for me to talk about this book. It's definitely a better book to read in one sitting, though I can never do that. I did like it very much though. ( )
  booklove2 | May 24, 2019 |
hard to rate. I love the lives of animals part. I liked the last two sections as well. 3.5/5? ( )
  weberam2 | Nov 24, 2017 |
Showing 1-5 of 35 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Coetzee, J. M.primary authorall editionsconfirmed
Baiocchi, MariaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Böhnke, ReinhildÜbersetzersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Bergsma, PeterTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Calvo, JavierTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Cossée, EvaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Lange, MonaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Lauga du Plessis, CatherineTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Loponen, SeppoTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Nolla, AlbertTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Pardoen, IrvingTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Preis, ThomasTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Il y a tout d'abord le problème de l'ouverture, c'est-à-dire comment nous faire passer d'où nous sommes, c'est-à-dire en ce moment nulle part, jusqu'à l'autre rive.
In de eerste plaats staan we voor de vraag hoe te beginnen, namelijk hoe ons te verplaatsen van de plek waar we ons bevinden en die vooralsnog nergens is, naar de andere oever.
There is first of all the problem of the opening, namely, how to get us from where we are, which is, as yet, nowhere, to the far bank.
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Elizabeth Costello is a distinguished and aging Australian novelist whose life is revealed through a series of eight formal addresses. From an award-acceptance speech at a New England liberal arts college to a lecture on evil in Amsterdam and a sexually charged reading by the poet Robert Duncan, the author draws the reader toward its astonishing conclusion. The novel is, on its surface, the story of a woman's life as mother, sister, lover, and writer. Yet it is also a profound and haunting meditation on the nature of storytelling.

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