HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Funeral in Berlin by Len Deighton
Loading...

Funeral in Berlin (original 1964; edition 1964)

by Len Deighton

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
497520,596 (3.73)17
Member:BillyBobHolland
Title:Funeral in Berlin
Authors:Len Deighton
Info:G. P. Putnam's Sons (1965), Hardcover, 1st. edition, 1st. printing, 312 pages
Collections:Len Deighton
Rating:***1/2
Tags:Harry Palmer Espionage novels #3

Work details

Funeral in Berlin by Len Deighton (1964)

1960s (4) 1964 (3) 20th century (11) adventure (3) Berlin (13) British (7) British fiction (3) Cold War (23) crime (3) crime fiction (7) Do.1 (back row) (4) espionage (60) fiction (86) Germany (11) given away (3) Harry Palmer (5) Len Deighton (3) London (3) mystery (16) novel (17) Prague (3) series (4) spy (37) spy fiction (13) suspense (6) thriller (39) UK (3) unread (6) US Army (4) WWII (5)
None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 17 mentions

Showing 5 of 5
I think, one of the few spy novels you'll read that has footnotes and an appendix. Doing a Google search on places and things referenced (i.e., "the Lighthouse cinema in Calcutta," or "topees piping 'Over the Seas to Sky'") will probably have to wait for me until the second reading. Even though my book's cover has a photo of Michael Caine, it's more Ian Holm I'm picturing as our hero. He is the antithesis of "Bond, James Bond." He has no name, but in this story he's assigned the name "Dorf." ( )
  Roycrofter | Mar 10, 2013 |
This is the third of Len Deighton's "nameless hero" books, although they can also be referred to as the "Harry Palmer" books, after Michael Caine's portrayal of the narrator. I had previously tried the first of these books, The Ipcress File, but wasn't engaging with it. This one was easier for me to get into, perhaps because I knew from the outset that the narrator would not be referred to by name, or perhaps the story was more interesting.

Our hero is tasked with arranging the defection of a Soviet agent named Semitsa, and there is plenty of double- and triple-crossing by the various personalities involved. The intricacy of the plot is illustrated by the quotations that begin each chapter: each one details a rule of chess and even kind of describe what is about to unfold, in an indirect way.

About 2/3 of the way through I lost a bit of steam (it can get a bit too twisty and turny sometimes), but I was able to complete the book eventually and did not hold the slowdown against the book. The dialogue and narration were what really carried the day for me, especially imagining some bits being said by Michael Caine (which may be my way of proceeding with The Ipcress File if I ever try that one again). For example:

"Been trying to get you since four o'clock this afternoon," the Charlotte Street switchboard said petulantly.
"I was in the toilet," I said.

Or this one, where the nameless hero's boss, Dawlish, is complaining about him playing his music too loud in the office:

Hero: "It's not in your office, it's in my office."
Dawlish: "It might just as well be in my office. I can't hear myself speak."
Hero: "You're not missing a thing."

I also chuckled at the description of Charlotte Street as running "north from Oxford Street and there are few who will blame it." Classic Deighton.

I would recommend this to those who have read at least one other Deighton novel, or at the very least anyone who comes into the book knowing that the hero won't actually be referred to by his real name (he does have an alias, but he complains bitterly about it, much to his secretary's and the reader's amusement). ( )
  rabbitprincess | Mar 29, 2012 |
This is not really my kind of book, but I got it as part of a set so gave it a go. The dialogue was terrible and I thought it felt quite cliched. The plot was convoluted and unclear, but I never found myself really caring about it that much anyway. ( )
  AlisonSakai | Mar 3, 2009 |
One of the most complex plots of any book I've read, but hugely enjoyable. ( )
  edwardsgt | Jan 28, 2007 |
Enjoyable, and often quite funny, thriller, marred by a wholly implausible final action scene. ( )
  ben_a | Jul 9, 2006 |
Showing 5 of 5
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Information from the Norwegian Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to the English one.
Original title
Information from the Norwegian Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to the English one.
Alternative titles
Original publication date
Information from the Norwegian Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to the English one.
People/Characters
Important places
Information from the Norwegian Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to the English one.
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

Book description
In Berlin, where neither side of the wall is safe, Colonel Stok of Red Army Security is prepared to sell an important Russian scientist to the West - for a price. British intelligence are willing to pay, providing their own top secret agent is in Berlin to act as go-between. But it soon becomes apparent that behind the facade of an elaborate mock funeral lies a game of deadly manoeuvres and ruthless tactics. A game in which the blood-stained legacy of Nazi Germany is enmeshed in the intricate moves of cold war espionage .
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0586045805, Paperback)

A ferociously cool Cold War thriller from the author of The Ipcress File. Len Deighton's third novel has become a classic, as compelling and suspenseful now as when it first exploded on to the bestseller lists. In Berlin, where neither side of the wall is safe, Colonel Stok of Red Army Security is prepared to sell an important Russian scientist to the West - for a price. British intelligence are willing to pay, providing their own top secret agent is in Berlin to act as go-between. But it soon becomes apparent that behind the facade of an elaborate mock funeral lies a game of deadly manoeuvres and ruthless tactics. A game in which the blood-stained legacy of Nazi Germany is enmeshed in the intricate moves of cold war espionage...

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 14:06:28 -0400)

(see all 6 descriptions)

A Red Army colonel offers to sell an important Russian scientist to the West. This Cold War deal quickly turns into a chess game, were players use ruthless tactics against their opponents moves.

(summary from another edition)

Quick Links

Swap Ebooks Audio
17 avail.
3 wanted
3 pay1 pay

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.73)
0.5
1 3
1.5 1
2 3
2.5 3
3 10
3.5 12
4 31
4.5 2
5 15

Audible.com

An edition of this book was published by Audible.com.

See editions

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

Help/FAQs | About | Privacy/Terms | Blog | Contact | LibraryThing.com | APIs | WikiThing | Common Knowledge | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | 91,510,297 books! | Top bar: Always visible