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The Vicar of Wakefield by Oliver Goldsmith
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The Vicar of Wakefield (1766)

by Oliver Goldsmith

Other authors: See the other authors section.

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English (37)  French (1)  All languages (38)
Showing 1-5 of 37 (next | show all)
This is one of those books that get mentioned in high school English (or did anyway), but which no one ever reads anymore, probably because it is so dated. Basically, this is a sort of morality tale. The protagonist and his family go through a series of calamities, each worse than the preceding one, and then in the last little bit, it all comes out well in the end.

Parts of the book reminded me of Pride and Prejudice. The protagonist was a bit like Mr. Bennet, well meaning, moralistic and somewhat ineffectual. His wife was a silly woman who spent her time scheming up ways to marry off her daughters.

There were a number of moral digressions, which seemed to me rather apropos to our current situation. Which is to say, scoundrels and corruption have ever been with us and have ever shared a pretty common strain.

Anyway, it was an enjoyable read, although not at the top of my list of favorites. ( )
  lgpiper | Jun 21, 2019 |
This is the story of a humble, gullible Vicar who lived the life of Job. I listened to this on an audio book as well as reading along. I felt the reader had a very false voice that was in excess. The story was very slow moving and almost unbelievable, but had a few amusing spots. I persisted! The novel is billed as a satire; but evidently I didn't "get it." ( )
  tess_schoolmarm | Mar 28, 2019 |
I can certainly see how this book was all the rage back in the late 1700's! It has sex, violence, villains and heroes. Quite a bit of stuff packed in this one. ( )
  Iambookish | Dec 14, 2016 |
Creativity: 7.5
Plot: 7
Characters: 7
Writing: 8
Pace: 6
Ending: 9.5
Stars: 3 ( )
  marybethsoper | Dec 12, 2016 |
Fiction
  BookstoogeLT | Dec 10, 2016 |
Showing 1-5 of 37 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors (167 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Goldsmith, Oliverprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Emslie, MacDonaldmain authorsome editionsconfirmed
Anhava, TuomasTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Julia R. PigginEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Rowlandson, ThomasIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Epigraph
Sperate miseri, cavete faelices

[Hope, ye wretched, beware, ye prosperous]
Dedication
First words
I was ever of opinion that the honest man, who married and brought up a large family, did more service than he who continued single, and only talked of population.
Quotations
The jewels of truth have been so imported by others, that nothing was left for me to import but some splendid things that, at a distance, looked every bit as well.
That virtue which requires to be ever guarded is scarce worth the sentinel.
However, when any one of our relations was found to be a person of very bad character, a troublesome guest, or one we desired to get rid of, upon his leaving my house, I ever took care to lend him a riding coat, or a pair of boots, or sometimes a horse of small value, and I always had the satisfaction of finding he never came back to return them.
The pain which conscience gives the man who has already done wrong is soon got over. Conscience is a coward; and those faults it has not strength enough to prevent, it seldom has justice enough to accuse.
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0140431594, Paperback)

"The greatest object in the universe, says a certain philosopher, is a good man struggling with adversity."

When Dr Primrose loses his fortune in a disastrous investment, his idyllic life in the country is shattered and he is forced to move with his wife and six children to an impoverished living on the estate of Squire Thornhill. Taking to the road in pursuit of his daughter, who has been seduced by the rakish Squire, the beleaguered Primrose becomes embroiled in a series of misadventures – encountering his long-lost son in a travelling theatre company and even spending time in a debtor’s prison. Yet Primrose, though hampered by his unworldliness and pride, is sustained by his unwavering religious faith. In The Vicar of Wakefield, Goldsmith gently mocks many of the literary conventions of his day – from pastoral and romance to the picaresque – infusing his story of a hapless clergyman with warm humour and amiable social satire.

In his introduction, Stephen Coote discusses Goldsmith’s eventful life, the literary devices used in the novel, and its central themes of Christianity, justice and the family. This edition also includes a bibliography and notes.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:17:21 -0400)

(see all 6 descriptions)

Rich with wisdom and gentle irony, Goldsmith's only novel tells of an unworldly and generous vicar who lives contentedly with his large family until disaster strikes. But bankruptcy, his daughter's abduction, and the vicar's imprisonment fail to dampen his spirit. Considered the author's finest work, this book is a delightful lampoon of 18th-century literary conventions.… (more)

» see all 16 descriptions

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