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Gone Tomorrow by Lee Child
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Gone Tomorrow (2009)

by Lee Child

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2,393832,582 (3.83)63
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  1. 30
    Rain Fall by Barry Eisler (BeckyJG)
    BeckyJG: John Rain is a hero who is similar in many ways to Jack Reacher. A man of action and of few words, deep, lonely (even if he doesn't realize it). Rain is perhaps more morally ambiguous than Reacher; both kill without hesitation and little remorse, but Rain is, after all, an assassin, and gets paid to do so.… (more)
  2. 20
    The Lion's Game by Nelson DeMille (BeckyJG)
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Showing 1-5 of 81 (next | show all)
Jack Reacher thinks he has seen a suicide bomber on the New York subway. The choice he makes about how to act goes onto have far reaching consequences. What else can I say apart from it's a Jack Reacher book? It's a great story, well told. It doesn't aspire to be high brow literature, but it is clever and the plot is well executed. If you want a book you can plough through in a couple of days then look no further. ( )
  cathymoore | Jan 22, 2014 |
Two days to read it. ( )
  brone | Dec 21, 2013 |
In just one of these books, I'd like to hear Jack Reacher ask himself, "How do I keep getting in these situations?" ( )
  jpackham | Dec 4, 2013 |
Any book that takes place in New York gets extra points, and this one had a definite sense of place. Jack Reacher witnessed a late night incident on the subway, and the story progressed from there. Cops, foreign operatives, good guys, bad guys, violence... just an ordinary few days in Reacher's life. ( )
  ennie | Dec 4, 2013 |
Amazon.com Review Book Description
New York City. Two in the morning. A subway car heading uptown. Jack Reacher, plus five other passengers. Four are okay. The fifth isnt. In the next few tense seconds Reacher will make a choice--and trigger an electrifying chain of events in this gritty, gripping masterwork of suspense by #1 New York Times bestseller Lee Child. Susan Mark was the fifth passenger. She had a lonely heart, an estranged son, and a big secret. Reacher, working with a woman cop and a host of shadowy feds, wants to know just how big a hole Susan Mark was in, how many lives had already been twisted before hers, and what danger is looming around him now. Because a race has begun through the streets of Manhattan in a maze crowded with violent, skilled soldiers on all sides of a shadow war. Susan Mark’s plain little life was critical to dozens of others in Washington, California, Afghanistan . . . from a former Delta Force operator now running for the U.S. Senate, to a beautiful young woman with a fantastic story to tell–and to a host of others who have just one thing in common: They’re all lying to Reacher. A little. A lot. Or maybe just enough to get him killed. In a novel that slams through one hairpin surprise after another, Lee Child unleashes a thriller that spans three decades and gnaws at the heart of America . . . and for Jack Reacher, a man who trusts no one and likes it that way, it’s a mystery with only one answer–the kind that comes when you finally get face-to-face and look your worst enemy in the eye. Amazon Exclusive Essay: Lee Child on Gone Tomorrow My career as a writer has been longer than some and shorter than others, but it happens to span the internet era more or less exactly. My first book, A year or so later I actually got e-mail, and a year or so after that I got a web site, and a couple of years after that I got broadband, and over the following few years I got into the habit of starting the day internet surfing, reading the news and the gossip. But it is not until now that I can say that one of my books--the thirteenth Reacher thriller, Gone Tomorrow--is truly and exclusively a product of the internet age. I started the surfing years in a sensible, structured manner, but I eventually learned that the best stuff comes randomly. I started to follow links on a whim, bouncing from place to place, Googling other people’s references, following the maze, looking for rabbit holes. I found an anonymous police blog from Britain. It was apparently hosted by a London copper, and because it was secure and anonymous it was uninhibited. The people who posted there said all kinds of things. There were complaints and there was bitching, of course, but also there was a frank and unexpurgated view of police work from behind the lines. I got there in the summer of 2005, just after the suicide bombings on London’s transportation system, and just after a completely innocent Brazilian student had been shot to death by London police, who were under the mistaken impression that the guy had been involved. Now, as a thriller writer, I’m familiar with the idea that cops can be bent or reckless. But I’m equally aware that’s mostly literary license. I know lots of cops, and they’re great people doing a very tough job. Years ago I met a friend’s eight-year-old daughter--a sweet little girl with no front teeth--and she grew up to be a cop. She won a bravery medal for a difficult solo arrest during which she was stabbed and had her thumb broken. She’s tough, but she’s not bent or reckless. So are the other cops I know. So I was curious: what happened with the Brazilian kid? How was the mistake made? So I eavesdropped while the coppers on the anonymous site were asking the same question. And I learned something interesting. Their first consensus explanation was: because of “the list.” The Brazilian boy was showing “all twelve signs.” I thought, what list? What signs? So I clicked and scrolled and Googled, and it turned out that years earlier Israeli counterintelligence had developed a failsafe checklist of physical and behavioral signifiers, that when all present and correct mean you are looking at a suicide bomber. The list had entered training manuals, and after 9/11 those manuals were studied like crazy all over the world. And the response was mandatory: you see a guy showing the signs, you put him down, right now, before he can blow himself up. And by sheer unlucky coincidence, the Brazilian kid had been showing the signs. A winter coat in July, a recent shave, and so on. (Read Gone Tomorrow if you want to know all twelve, and why.) All writing is what if? So I tried to imagine that moment of... disbelief, I guess. You see a guy showing the signs, and probably every fiber of your being is saying, “This can’t be.” But you’re required to act. So for the opening scene of Gone Tomorrow, I had Reacher sitting on a subway train in New York City, staring at a woman who is showing the signs. Reacher is ex-military law enforcement, and he knows the list forward and backward. Half of his brain is saying, “This can’t be,” and the other half is programmed to act. What does he do? What if he’s wrong? What will happen? That’s where the story starts. It ends hundreds of pages later, in a place you both do and don’t expect. --_Lee Child_ (Photo © Sigrid Estrada) From Publishers Weekly Starred Review. All good thriller writers know how to build suspense and keep the pages turning, but only better ones deliver tight plots as well, and only the best allow the reader to match wits with both the hero and the author. Bestseller Child does all of that in spades in his 13th Jack Reacher adventure (after Nothing to Lose). Early one morning on a nearly empty Manhattan subway car, the former army MP notices a woman passenger he suspects is a suicide bomber. The deadly result of his confronting her puts him on a trail leading back to the Soviet war in Afghanistan in the 1980s and forward to the war on terrorism. Reacher finds a bit of help among the authorities demanding answers from him, like the NYPD and the FBI, as well as threats and intimidation. And then there are the real bad guys that the old pro must track down and eliminate. Child sets things up subtly and ingeniously, then lets Reacher use both strength and guile to find his way to the exciting climax. (May)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  Hans.Michel | Sep 13, 2013 |
Showing 1-5 of 81 (next | show all)
The precise maneuvers... illustrate why Mr. Child is so good at what he does. But what is he doing? “Gone Tomorrow” has such a case of villain inflation that it involves itself in global geopolitics on the highest order. One step higher into the upper reaches of evildoing and Mr. Child could find himself on the moon.
 
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For my sisters-in-law, Leslie and Sally, two women of rare charm and quality
First words
Suicide bombers are easy to spot. They give out all kinds of telltale signs. Mostly because they're nervous. By definition they're all first-timers.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Please do not combine Lee Child's 13th Jack Reacher novel, Gone Tomorrow with his 10th Jack Reacher novel, The Hard Way. This LT work uses ISBN 376450238X, which is associated with the German translation of The Hard Way. Thank you.
Please do not combine Lee Child's 13th Jack Reacher novel, Gone Tomorrow with his 10th Jack Reacher novel, The Hard Way. This LT work uses ISBN 376450238X, which is associated with the German translation of The Hard Way. Thank you.
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Book description
The 13th book in the Reacher series finds Jack Reacher in a Manhattan subway at 2 am where an ordinary looking passenger leads to out of the ordinary danger.
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The former military police major and notorious drifter Jack Reacher grows suspicious of a fellow subway passenger as their train approaches Grand Central Station in New York City. As a shady situation develops, Reacher debates between intervening to save surrounding lives or avoiding the predicament in order to save his own. He confronts a suicide bomber on the nearly deserted Manhattan subway car--a confrontation that will lead him back to the Soviet war in Afghanistan in the 1980s and forward to the war on terrorism as he tracks down and eliminates the bad guys.… (more)

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