HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Joy of Cooking: 75th Anniversary Edition by…
Loading...

Joy of Cooking: 75th Anniversary Edition (edition 2006)

by Irma S. Rombauer

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
1,255136,309 (4.36)18
Member:micketymoc
Title:Joy of Cooking: 75th Anniversary Edition
Authors:Irma S. Rombauer
Info:Scribner (2006), Hardcover, 1152 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:*****
Tags:us trip, cooking, reference, nonfiction

Work details

Joy of Cooking: 75th Anniversary Edition - 2006 by Irma S. Rombauer

None.

Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 18 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 13 (next | show all)
Love this cookbook. If it were the only cookbook I could have, I would never feel deprived. ( )
  lesmel | Apr 11, 2013 |
If you look on GoodReads under "Popular Cookbooks Books" (sic) the Joy of Cooking is right at the top. It's reputably the go to cookbook, a "teaching" cookbook for those who don't just burn toast, they're capable of burning water. I'm not that bad, but neither am I a gourmet---I could use some teaching. I've long coveted this doorstopper book of 1,132 pages containing 4,500 recipes and finally broke down and ordered it when I had a Barnes and Noble coupon. It's like an encyclopedia of cooking.

It took some getting used to. The recipes aren't organized in the manner I've come to expect. Take, for instance, the beginning of the recipe for Chili Con Carne on page 513:

Pat dry:
3 pounds boneless beef chuck, trimmed and cut into 1/2-inch cubes

Season with:

1 to 2 teaspoons salt

Heat in a large skillet over medium-high heat:

2 tablespoons olive oil

And so on. Do you see what I mean? I'm used to recipes that list all the ingredients at the top, with instructions separate beneath. It was so different than how I'd done things for decades it was hard to adjust initially, although its ways have grown on me. Worth the price alone just for the sections after recipes such as "Keeping and Storing Food," "Know Your Ingredients" and "Cooking Methods and Techniques." ( )
  LisaMaria_C | Oct 16, 2012 |
I got this cookbook primarily as a reference for looking up common recipes and techniques. It does that job very well. It probably has a version of almost every recipe you can think of, although they are often very scaled-down. Think of these recipes as a place to start creating in the kitchen or foundations to build on. While I consult this cookbook regularly, I don't cook out of it every day. ( )
  sturlington | Mar 31, 2012 |
I was comparing this book to a library copy of How to Cook Everything. How to Cook Everything seems to have much fewer recipes but endless ways to do each one. The recipes do look very simple, but it also seems a little boring to me. Quite a few people on other websites complained about a lot of bad recipes and some errors. I found some errors myself despite my cursory review of the book. For example, on the section called "My Top 100 Fast recipes," it listed the wrong page number for a recipe I was interested in. I also found a wrong page number in the index, so I lost confidence in the book.

I finally made my decision, and that is to buy two copies of the Joy of Cooking, one for myself and one for my daughter-in-law, a newlywed. The recipes just look a lot more interesting/tasty, and people on the many review postings only had good things to say about the recipes. I hope to update this later once I have tried some recipes. ( )
  itbgc | Dec 4, 2011 |
A must have cookbook! Whether you are serious about learning to cook from scratch, are in need of menu suggestions for large crowds, or are just more interested in knowing more about your ingredients, this is a must have cookbook. I honestly believe that it belongs in every kitchen! ( )
  jmg364 | Jul 2, 2010 |
Showing 1-5 of 13 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language
Book description
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Amazon.com Review (ISBN 0743246268, Hardcover)

The much anticipated 75th anniversary edition of Irma Rombauer's kitchen classic Joy of Cooking promises to be as indispensable as past editions of this generational favorite. In addition to hundreds of brand-new recipes, this Joy is filled with many recipes from all previous editions, retested and reinvented for today's tastes.

Take the new Joy for a test-run in the kitchen with these featured recipes for Roast Brined Turkey and Apple Pie, and watch a video demonstration for their recipe for 10-in-One Cookies. And read on for celebrity chef "Odes to Joy," Joy timeline, and Joy trivia.
Odes to Joy


"Great cookbooks are not just collections of interesting recipes. They are, first and foremost, books that tell a story, the story of how people lived and cooked at a particular point in time. They reveal, to borrow an expression from James Beard, their delights and prejudices, their view of the social order, their appetite for serving others food that meets the expectations of their social class. Food can be anything and everything from fuel to an object of intellectual curiosity to full-bore hedonism that transports the mind and body far from the dinner table with just one overwhelming bite.

I started cooking out of an early edition of Joy when I was only 7 years old. I remember making a basic chocolate cake with 7-minute frosting. The cake turned out fine, but the frosting resembled gruel and was my introduction to the importance of following a recipe to the letter. Evidently my lack of patience and precision had led me astray. But after that first brush with culinary failure, Joy led me to many, many successes over the years; more to the point, I became enamored of Ms. Rombauer's voice, the matter-of-fact charm that led her to suggest "stand facing the stove" as a sensible first step in any recipe.

The amateur but highly evolved enthusiasm that Irma Rombauer brought to the world of home cooking was a breath of fresh air after the slightly earlier era of culinary dowagers Fannie Farmer, Mrs. Beaton, and Marion Harland. To those pillars of culinary wisdom, recipes were shorthand for cooks who had spent a lifetime in the kitchen. A pie pastry recipe might be written as "make a paste." But Ms. Rombauer was there to hold our hands, to put food in a social context and give it attitude, energy, and meaning in a world where food was leaping past the narrow formality of the Victorian age.

For all of our worldly knowledge about ingredients and culinary custom, few cookbook authors have managed to perfectly capture, without artifice or self-conscious chatter, the vernacular of an age. Irma Rombauer introduced us to a room in our home--the kitchen--that was to become a place of enjoyment, not just one of backbreaking labor. She represented the essence of the new American experience, which suggested that everything in life could be transformed into pleasure with nothing more than the proper attitude. And what better way to celebrate this new age than to have a smashing cocktail party with the perfect hors d’oeuvres?

The original Joy of Cooking was mind over matter, the perfect mix of attitude and function. Even as times have changed, the Joy stands out as a watershed volume, a book that speaks to the very heart of who we want to be in the kitchen: producers of our own story, directors of the good American life.

And, according to Ms. Rombauer, all we have to do is take that first easy step and "stand facing the stove." --Christopher Kimball, founder and editor of Cook's Illustrated "I'm often asked to pick my favorite cookbook. Considering that there are over 3,000 cookbooks published each year, it's a daunting task to try to narrow them down. Speaking as a chef who never went to cooking school, I've been enthralled by certain cookbooks, immersing myself from cover to cover and learning about exotic cuisines from all over the world. But for just plain basic information, both the original and revised Joy of Cooking are still my bibles. I can't tell you how many times my wife Jackie and I have thumbed through the stained and broken-backed copy of Joy in our home kitchen, looking for our favorite angel food cake recipe, our favorite skillet corn bread, our favorite fluffy biscuits, and crisp waffles, and on and on. It's tough to picture my family table--or, in fact, the American table--without a well-worn copy of Joy of Cooking in the background." " --Tom Douglas, author of I Love Crab Cakes! "I highly recommend this book as a must-have in your kitchen. Chock full of great information, this book takes all of the guess work out and leaves no stone unturned." --Paula Deen, author of Paula Deen Celebrates! "In our kitchen, Joy of Cooking is a tool as indispensable as the chef's knife, the scale, the whisk. We actually own two copies--a shelf-copy for reading, and one whose sauce-splattered, dog-eared pages bear witness to just how much joy we get from Joy." " --Matt Lee and Ted Lee, authors of The Lee Bros. Southern Cookbook "Joy of Cooking is the ultimate reference guide that I have been using for years. It's timeless and packed with perfect recipes for the home cook that stands up to the test of time." --Tyler Florence, author of Tyler's Ultimate "Joy of Cooking is a book I turn to whenever I have a question about food or cooking. The new edition is the combined effort of some of the best cooks writing today; I know I can trust its information. And trust is, to my mind, the essential quality of all great cookbooks." --Sally Schneider, author of The Improvisational Cook "When Andrew first contemplated becoming a chef in the 1980s, he asked two Boston chefs of his acquaintance what books he should read. Each independently recommended Joy of Cooking as THE classic with reliable recipes for just about everything. (The second chef urged him to look for an early copy for the sheer entertainment value of reading how to cook a possum.) A decade later, when we interviewed 60 of America’s leading chefs for our first book Becoming a Chef, we asked them the same question--and again Joy was one of their five most recommended books. In fact, we recommend buying two copies, like we did: we keep our chocolate-smudged copy of Joy in our kitchen, and a reading copy on our bookshelves." --Andrew Dorenburg and Karen Page, authors of What to Drink with What You Eat "Our Joy of Cooking is dog-eared, flour dusted, chocolate smudged, oil spattered, and easily the most used cookbook on the shelf. The staggering amount of information in the book taught us the basics when we were in our teens and has informed our cooking for the decades since. We wish we had written it!" --Johanne Killeen and George Germon, authors of On Top of Spaghetti "I received a copy of Joy of Cooking in my late teens. I have treasured the cookbook ever since and still use it frequently as a reference. In the late 80's I was asked to represent American Cooking in Italy. I cooked all over the country for 2 months. The only book I took was Joy of Cooking. When ingredients that I had ordered did not show up and I had to totally wing it, I used this book to get me out of a few jams--like what the proportions are to make your own baking powder! If I could have only one cookbook--other than my own of course!--it would be Joy of Cooking–-as it is the bible of American cooking" --Kathy Casey, author of Kathy Casey's Northwest Table "I have purchased Joy of Cooking for all my restaurant libraries as well as my own. The recipes always work--always--and the informational chapters are accurate, to the point, and incredibly helpful--couldn’t live with out it!!" --Cindy Pawlcyn, author of Big Small Plates

A Brief History ofJoy

1930: The United States stock market crashes creating the great depression. • 1931: Irma Rombauer takes $3,000, the modest legacy her husband leaves at his death, and she self-publishes the first Joy of Cooking. She is 54 years old. • 1932: Irma tries to sell her book to a commercial publisher, Bobbs-Merrill of Indianapolis, IN, and is rejected. • 1933: Prohibition is repealed and Adolf Hilter becomes to Chancellor of Germany. • 1935: Bobbs-Merrill receives another submission of the Joy of Cooking from Irma. This version is not the self-published book but a revision, typed and bound in 15 notebook binders. • 1936: March 26 is the publication date for the first commercial Joy of Cooking. The first print run is 10,000 copies and the book costs $2.50. • 1937: The Golden Gate Bridge is completed in San Francisco and Gone with the Wind, a Scribner book, wins the Pulitzer Prize. • 1939: Bobbs-Merrill publishes Irma Rombauer's book Streamlined Cooking, a cookbook dedicated to convenience foods. The book is not a commercial success. • 1940: Freeze-drying is invented. • 1941: Pearl Harbor is attacked and America enters World War II. • 1943: The bestselling "wartime" edition of Joy of Cooking is published which includes how to creatively deal with the food rationing during World War II. • 1946: A "post-war" edition is printed with very few changes. • 1947: The microwave oven is invented. • 1951: Marion Rombauer Becker joins her mother Irma as co-author of this edition. • 1955: Gunsmoke debuts on CBS. • 1961: John F. Kennedy is inaugurated as the President of the United States. • 1962: Irma Rombauer dies in her native St. Louis. The sixth edition of Joy of Cooking is published. • 1963: The French Chef with Julia Child debuts on public television. • 1969: Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin become the first to walk on the moon. • 1970: The Beatles break up. • 1974: President Nixon resigns and Stephen King’s Carrie is published. • 1975: The first--and last--edition of Joy of Cooking that is completely Marion Rombauer Becker's work is published. • 1979: Margaret Thatcher becomes the Prime Minister of Great Britain. • 1980: The median household income in the United States is $19,074 and it seems the entire country is playing PacMan. • 1981: The first genetically engineer plant--the Flavr Savr tomato--is approved for sale. • 1984: Coca-Cola changes its 99-year-old formula and launches New Coke. • 1990: East and West Germany unite. • 1997: After a more than a two decade hiatus, the eighth edition of Joy of Cooking is published by Scribner with Ethan, Marion's son, at the helm. • 2006: A new edition of Joy of Cooking, based on the writing and structure of the 1975 edition, is published to celebrate the 75th anniversary of Irma Rombauer's self-published cookbook.

Joy Trivia

• For the 75th anniversary edition, 4,500 recipes were tested that used a total of 400 pounds of butter, 300 quarts of milk, 485 pounds of red meat, and 275 pounds of fish and shellfish.

• The average age of a recipe tester working on the 75th anniversary edition was 46.7 years.

• Recipe testers spend 8,798 hours testing recipes and techniques for the latest edition.

• The knife was the first cutlery invented, followed by the spoon, and, much later, the fork (11th century A.D.).

• Caffeine is the most widely used behavior-changing chemical ingested worldwide.

• Eating cheese slows the decay of teeth.

• A light coating of oil speeds cooking and improves flavor of most grilled foods.

• Some of the most requested recipes from past Joy of Cooking editions include Chicken Marengo, Chocolate Cake (also known as the "Rombauer Special"), and Golden Glow Gelatin Salad.

• Ice is considered one of the most important ingredients in making drinks.

• Popsicles, baby back ribs, smoothies, and power bars are just a few of the recipes making their debut in the 2006 anniversary edition.

• The 2006 Joy of Cooking has instructions on using natural ingredients to color Easter eggs: beets for pink; chopped red cabbage for blue; tumeric for yellow; and the skins of 12 red onions for orange to burnt orange.

• Slow cooker recipes are included in the 2006 Joy for the first time.

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:55:34 -0400)

(see all 4 descriptions)

A classic guide to American cooking features thousands of traditional recipes and five hundred new dishes, in a volume that includes an array of favorite casserole, dessert, and soup options.

(summary from another edition)

Quick Links

Swap Ebooks Audio
2 avail.
547 wanted

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (4.36)
0.5
1 1
1.5 1
2 4
2.5 2
3 10
3.5 5
4 68
4.5 11
5 95

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

Help/FAQs | About | Privacy/Terms | Blog | Contact | LibraryThing.com | APIs | WikiThing | Common Knowledge | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | 92,104,964 books! | Top bar: Always visible