HomeGroupsTalkMoreZeitgeist
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

The World's Best Fairy Tales by Belle Becker…
Loading...

The World's Best Fairy Tales (edition 1967)

by Belle Becker Sideman (Editor), Fritz Kredel (Illustrator)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
633926,246 (4.2)5
A collection of stories from many islands, each of which has the special flavour of its country of origin.
Member:tkenney426
Title:The World's Best Fairy Tales
Authors:Belle Becker Sideman (Editor)
Other authors:Fritz Kredel (Illustrator)
Info:Pleasantville: The Reader's Digest Association, 1967
Collections:Your library
Rating:
Tags:fairy tales, fiction, first edition, anthology, children's literature

Work details

The World's Best Fairy Tales by Belle Becker Sideman

None.

None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 5 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 9 (next | show all)
An anthology of fairy tales from various places around the world. Reading fairy tales is a great way to learn about distant times and places. I was familiar with a lot of the European ones (Grimms) and some Arabian ones (1001 Arabian Nights), but other regions have their own series of folk tales, equally fascinatingly bizarre. ( )
  krista.rutherford | May 16, 2015 |
My mother had this book in her book collection when I was little and through it I discovered that there was much more to these tales than what the Disney versions would have you think. They can be much darker and deeper than they are portrayed on screen. This collection can also introduce someone to more than the standard stories. Because of this collection I think my favorites are "The Goose Girl", "East of the Sun, West of the Moon", and "The Six Swans".

I've read reviews here and elsewhere that say that these stories may have still been simplified a bit, but they are still a vast improvement over the Disney versions. I've yet to get a hold of a copy of the original Grimm or Anderson collections, but because of this book I've fallen in love with Fairy Tales and I can't really fault it much because of that. ( )
  princess_mischa | Sep 17, 2012 |
I have owned this book now for nigh on 40 years. It was gifted to my parents when I was born. I read it and re-read it and re-read many times as a child and I still enjoy the tales, even if they have been modified to make them more palatable. Even so, my favourite tale is "The Goose-Girl" mostly because of the sentence passed on the servant girl; it was gruesome to this child's mind, but I relished it and though she deserved it. The magic in the tale also captured my imagination, as it did in all the tales.

I doubt I will ever release this book and now that it has been retrieved from solitary confinement in storage, I hope to find a bookbinder to repair its sorry, leatherbound spine and restore it somewhat to its glory days. ( )
  Sile | Nov 22, 2010 |
The Princess And The Pea is 1 out of 33 fairy tales in The World's Best Fairy Tales: A Readers Digest Anthology. The Princess And The Pea was written by Hans Christian Andersen. It was about a Prince who really wanted to marry a Princess who was truly a Princess. He travelled the entire world but still could not find a true Princess. Finally, during a very stormy night with thunder and lightning, a Princess arrived at the Prince's Castle who said that she truly was a Princess. To prove that the Princess was telling the truth, the Queen got the Princess to sleep on top of 20 eiderdown quilts and 20 mattresses that were all placed on top of a pea. If the Princess can feel the pea while sleeping, then she truly is a princess. The Princess did feel the pea while sleeping which proved that she was truly a Princess. The Prince married the Princess at the end of the Fairy Tale.

This is a very good Fairy Tale. It is exciting the whole way through. I did not expect that the feeling of a pea helps to determine if a Princess is truly a princess. I give the Fairy Tale 5 out of 5 stars based on my review. ( )
  Chiubaca | Nov 7, 2010 |
I read several of the folktales from this collection and wanted to add it because of its dated quality. The tales have been thoroughly Westernized (Japanese Character pray to God, illustrations are littered with cultural stereotypes. For its time I'm sure this anthology was groundbreaking in its inclusion of other cultures, but today a lot of the then-forward ideas seem more backwards than progressive. ( )
  ffox | Apr 12, 2009 |
Showing 1-5 of 9 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

A collection of stories from many islands, each of which has the special flavour of its country of origin.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
sister mice looking for their parents
Haiku summary

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (4.2)
0.5
1
1.5 1
2 1
2.5
3 8
3.5 3
4 23
4.5 1
5 26

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 150,500,642 books! | Top bar: Always visible