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The Master of Go by Yasunari Kawabata
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The Master of Go (1951)

by Yasunari Kawabata

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9882412,566 (4.03)67
Recently added byporges, somethingbrighter, finndraffin, annelari, alo1224, richarddeanowen, jacobgo, private library, PZR, ElectedFungus
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» See also 67 mentions

English (22)  Spanish (1)  French (1)  All languages (24)
Showing 1-5 of 22 (next | show all)
After so many years of not reading Russian, I picked up this book to start again.
That was not such a good idea. The language itself was not a problem, itbwas the book.
I have no idea what go is (apart from being a board game) and I have even less knowledge of how it is played and what the common curtesy rules are. And in that there was my main obstacle. No knowledge of Go.

Too bad I don't know the game and irs traditions. But I won't learn them either just to be ablw to finish this book.
  BoekenTrol71 | May 10, 2016 |
A journey into a national psychology, this book is an exploration of how Japan is changing. A game, but a haunting one. ( )
  dbsovereign | Jan 26, 2016 |
Beautiful. As much as the game Go, and the match that takes place over 6 months, are the driving forces behind the novel, it has little to do with 'teaching' the reader about Go. I finished with a spotty, vague understanding of the game - but with a clear picture of a critical time in Japan, and old-guard-to-new tipping point. A quiet, beautiful elegy not to an age as much as to those who belonged in that age and wouldn't come around again in the next. It was the perfect book for me to read over a few days that had quiet time built in: a business trip in my case, with a couple hours in a hotel room each night where I could count on not being interrupted. ( )
  buffalopoet | Nov 16, 2015 |
I read this and Stefan Zweig's Chess Story back-to-back, and was very happy that I did. Both deal with the psychological effects of obsessing over complex boardgames, and explore a central character whose life has been consumed by such obsession. Despite the fact that Chess Story takes a fictional approach, while Kawabata's book is based on an actual person, there were many parallels between the two works, and each highlighted aspects of the other that otherwise I might have missed. While both books on their own are probably only worth three stars, the resonance created by reading them one after the other magnified my enjoyment so much that I'm giving both four stars. ( )
  BayardUS | Dec 10, 2014 |
A gripping and elegaic psychological drama. ( )
  dazzyj | Jun 18, 2014 |
Showing 1-5 of 22 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors (9 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Yasunari Kawabataprimary authorall editionscalculated
Felstead, CathyCover designersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Frankenhuysen, Annemarie vanTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Seidensticker, Edward G.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Wolterbeek, VincentCover designersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Mr Kawabata has described The Master of Go as 'a faithful chronicle-novel'.

Introduction.
Shūsai, Master of Go, twenty-first in the Honimbō succession, died in Atami, at the Urokaya Inn, on the morning of January 18, 1940.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Records the struggles of the Master as he attempts to defend his title and ideals while playing a young challenger in the Japanese game of go.

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