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Keeping Faith by Jodi Picoult
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Keeping Faith (original 1999; edition 2008)

by Jodi Picoult

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3,452671,560 (3.66)62
Member:booksintheburbs
Title:Keeping Faith
Authors:Jodi Picoult
Info:Avon (2008), Edition: Reprint, Mass Market Paperback, 512 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:****
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Keeping Faith by Jodi Picoult (1999)

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Showing 1-5 of 65 (next | show all)
on Tuesday, August 12, 2008 I wrote about this book:

Finished reading last night. I liked this book. Very interesting subject. Maybe the book could have been a bit shorter and it would have been better but all in all a very good read.
8.5

( )
  Marlene-NL | Apr 12, 2013 |
Keeping Faith. Jodie Picoult. 2010. This must have been a good deal on the Kindle because I usually like to read hard copies of Picoult so I can share with friends. This book is as readable and suspenseful as the other Picoult novels I’ve read. Mariah White and and her daughter Faith come home early and find her husband with another woman. Mariah quickly divorces her husband. Shortly after Faith who has had no religious training whatsoever starts seeing the Virgin Mary, healing people and develops stigmata! The media discovers Faith and life becomes a nightmare. A rabbi, a Catholic priest and a con man who has become famous debunking all things religious try to determine if Faith is imagining her visions or if they are real. ( )
  judithrs | Dec 10, 2012 |
The story starts with Mariah and her daughter, Faith having a very normal, typical life. En route to dance class, Faith reminds her mom that her leotard was left at home. U-turning home, Faith and Mariah notice Colin is back from his work trip and little Faith runs inside the house to embrace her daddy that she loves and adores. However, Faith and Mariah walk in on Colin and his mistress, Jessica. From there, the story truly begins.

Mariah spirals into a depression, however she is able to rely on her mom to take care of Faith while she is basically comatose from the shock of finding out about the affair. Faith stops talking and is basically catatonic from walking in on her dad and the mistress and feeling it’s her fault that her family split up.

The debate of God’s existence, religion and non-religion, family, spirituality, science, and mental illness are some of the topics that Jodi addresses in this book. There are so many layers to this storyline, with complex characters, that I found myself immersed in this book quite quickly. I’ve read House Rules by Jodi Picoult and didn’t like the way the chapters were broken down by character’s viewpoints. This story is written primarily through Mariah’s point of view,with different characters at times sharing from their viewpoint, however it is only done when it will enhance the storyline…not confuse it.

Because Mariah is a non-practicing Jew and Colin is a non-practicing Episcopalian, Catholic priests and Rabbi’s start showing up at the house to question Faith. The primary issues are: is God female, does Faith have stigmata, and can God perform miracles through a girl who doesn’t follow a religion nor know anything about the Bible. Then, there is Ian, an atheist that is as famous as Billy Graham and is on tour. His tour takes him to Faith, where he is determined to show that Faith is a hoax and her mother is behind it all. However, he starts to know the family, falls in love with Mariah, and his faith is questioned as he witnesses a miracle. While he tries to figure out how to run his show, please the producers, and keep the trust he has with Mariah and Faith, he has his own challenges to go through in this book.

Again, there are just so many issues that each character is faced with overcoming that you will engaged throughout the whole book!

In the end, readers will finish the book knowing that God is real, Jesus is the son of God, and miracles do happen today. While there is a lot that happens in the book, I don’t want to share too much because I highly recommend this book to everyone. However, I will add that I was quite confused with the ending of the book. While the book does overall end with questions answered, I was quite perplexed by the last scene in the book. I realize that the author is showing that God moved on to another person who needed Him more and also to show that it was God performing the miracles and not Faith, but what was the deal with Mariah’s “knife” smile???? Why did Jodi use that particular word in the book? I can understand that Faith is scared when she realizes that she is now alone and God (Guard) is no longer with her, and even that she carries a private conversation (meant to be heard by Mom) because she was in some ways scared Mom would start ignoring her again and/or Faith would no longer be important to her (of course, this is through a child’s perspective), but the knife smile is what really confused me. Is it that mom could see through Faith and realized that God’s spirit was around either and the knife smile was her cutting through the B.S. or that Mariah was angry to leave Ian and check on her (so in some ways regressing to old patterns)? In the end, it is quite clear that both will need counseling as is suggested by Kenzie, psychiatrists, and the lawyers. This end scene just confirms that. ( )
  booksintheburbs | Nov 5, 2012 |
I did really enjoy this book, and I'm kind of surprised by that.
In starting it I found it painfully predictable; and then an acquaintance saw me reading it and told me it does get better and to get ready to be up all night, not able to finish it. It did get better and I did find myself unwilling to stop reading once I started ... but once I stopped reading there was no real pull to get me to pick it up again and start reading (until the last 2 chapters -- chapters are VERY long). [That's why I only gave it 4 1/2 stars ...]

I did not find the writing or storyline to be offensive (I'm deeply and devoutly Catholic) and actually really enjoyed the back and forth between the Catholic priests and the Jewish rabbis. I have great respect for Jews, more so than I do for Protestants. I really enjoyed that aspect of the storyline. I don't know how much the author knows about the background workings of the Catholic Church, at the "local" level -- bishop -- but I wish she had played more into the politics that take place. In my experience, the bishop is the last to know anything, especially "decisions" he's made. The underlings under him make those decisions and inform him when they go wrong.

And finally, I loved the "love" scenes between the two characters ... I really felt it and understood it, which I greatly enjoyed : )

Adrianne ( )
  Adrianne_p | Aug 16, 2012 |
This personally is my favorite book by Jodi Picoult. I'm an atheist but I did still enjoy reading this novel. I think it sends an important message. I never know how much to write in my reviews just in case people haven't read it yet, I don't want to give too much away. I like the concept of the book and I'd say it is worth the read. ( )
  gagirl101 | Nov 17, 2011 |
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» Add other authors (3 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Picoult, Jodiprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Foss, ElizaNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Gibson, JuliaNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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For Laura Gross
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Under normal circumstances, Faith and I should not be home when my mother calls and invites us to come see her brand-new coffin.
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Book description
Somewhere between belief and doubt lies faith. For the second time in her marriage, Mariah White catches her husband with another woman and Faith, their seven year old daughter, witnesses every painful minute. In the aftermath of a sudden divorce, Mariah struggles with depression and Faith seeks solace in a new friend… a friend who may or may not be imaginary.

Faith talks to her "Guard"constantly; begins to recite passages from the Bible— a book she's never read. Fearful for her daughter's sanity, Mariah sends her to several psychiatrists. Yet when Faith develops stigmata and begins to perform miraculous healings, Mariah wonders if her daughter-- a girl with no religious background-- might indeed be seeing God. As word spreads and controversy heightens, Mariah and Faith are besieged by believers and disbelievers alike, caught in a media circus that threatens what little stability they have left.

What are you willing to believe? Is Faith a prophet or a troubled little girl? Is Mariah a good mother facing an impossible crisis— or a charlatan using her daughter to reclaim the attention her unfaithful husband withheld? As the story builds to a climactic battle for custody, Mariah must discover that spirit is not necessarily something that comes from religion, but from inside oneself.
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0060878061, Paperback)

One of America's most powerful and thought-provoking novelists, New York Times bestselling author Jodi Picoult brilliantly examines belief, miracles, and the complex core of family.

When the marriage of Mariah White and her cheating husband, Colin, turns ugly and disintegrates, their seven-year-old daughter, Faith, is there to witness it all. In the aftermath of a rapid divorce, Mariah falls into a deep depression -- and suddenly Faith, a child with no religious background whatsoever, hears divine voices, starts reciting biblical passages, and develops stigmata. And when the miraculous healings begin, mother and daughter are thrust into the volatile center of controversy and into the heat of a custody battle -- trapped in a mad media circus that threatens what little stability the family has left.

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 14:00:43 -0400)

(see all 7 descriptions)

Faith, a seven-year-old girl whose family is torn apart by divorce, begins talking to God and performing miracles, and her family enters a media circus of believers, critics, medical professionals, and lawyers.

(summary from another edition)

» see all 9 descriptions

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