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Wait Till Next Year: A Memoir by Doris…
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Wait Till Next Year: A Memoir

by Doris Kearns Goodwin

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Showing 1-5 of 27 (next | show all)
Absolutely love!!!! ( )
  mollygerry | Nov 25, 2018 |
growing up in 1950s New York, loving the Dodgers ( )
  margaretfield | May 30, 2018 |
Recommended by Mrs. Capone!
By the award-winning author of Team of Rivals and The Bully Pulpit, Wait Till Next Year is Doris Kearns Goodwin’s touching memoir of growing up in love with her family and baseball.

Set in the suburbs of New York in the 1950s, Wait Till Next Year re-creates the postwar era, when the corner store was a place to share stories and neighborhoods were equally divided between Dodger, Giant, and Yankee fans.

We meet the people who most influenced Goodwin’s early life: her mother, who taught her the joy of books but whose debilitating illness left her housebound: and her father, who taught her the joy of baseball and to root for the Dodgers of Jackie Robinson, Roy Campanella, Pee Wee Reese, Duke Snider, and Gil Hodges. Most important, Goodwin describes with eloquence how the Dodgers’ leaving Brooklyn in 1957, and the death of her mother soon after, marked both the end of an era and, for her, the end of childhood.
-summary provided by goodreads.com
  Clippers | Dec 21, 2017 |
Trials and tribulations of being a Dodger fan ( )
  JackSweeney | Jan 10, 2017 |
I really wanted to like this one. I'm a guy and a baseball fan, but I've long suspected that I follow baseball like a lot of female baseball fans do: I care less about winning and statistical excellence than about the stories, personalities, culture and aesthetics of the game. So "Wait Till Next Year" seemed like a good fit for me. After having gotten halfway through it, though, I'm dismayed to report that there doesn't seem to be enough material in here to make a book out of. We get some fond reminiscences about growing up on Long Island during the prosperous fifties, a description of the author's home life, and, yes, a lot about baseball. But what seems to be lacking is any analysis of why the game appealed to the author, or what she got out of it. She was a Dodgers fan, and this seems to have cemented the bond she had with her father...but then, what? In "Wait Till Next Year," her connection with the team and the game doesn't seem to go too far beyond standard-issue sports fan tribalism. The author, though she seems quite aware of the particular social conditions under which she grew up, seems to be hewing too close to the emotions she might have experienced as a very young Dodgers fan. But I'm still not sure what that might have contributed to her adult self. Not what I was looking for. ( )
1 vote TheAmpersand | May 14, 2016 |
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In memory of my parents, Michael and Helen Kearns, and to my sisters, Charlotte and Jeanne
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When I was six, my father gave me a bright-red scorebook that opened my heart to the game of baseball.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0684847957, Paperback)

Set in the suburbs of New York in the 1950s, Wait Till Next Year is Doris Kearns Goodwin's touching memoir of growing up in love with her family and baseball. She re-creates the postwar era, when the corner store was a place to share stories and neighborhoods were equally divided between Dodger, Giant, and Yankee fans.

We meet the people who most influenced Goodwin's early life: her mother, who taught her the joy of books but whose debilitating illness left her housebound: and her father, who taught her the joy of baseball and to root for the Dodgers of Jackie Robinson, Roy Campanella, Pee Wee Reese, Duke Snider, and Gil Hodges. Most important, Goodwin describes with eloquence how the Dodgers' leaving Brooklyn in 1957, and the death of her mother soon after, marked both the end of an era and, for her, the end of childhood.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:25:38 -0400)

(see all 4 descriptions)

Wait Till Next Year is the story of a young girl growing up in the suburbs of New York in the 1950s. When owning a single-family home on a tree-lined street, meant the realization of dreams. When everyone knew everyone else on the block and the children gathered in the streets to play from sunup to sundown. The neighborhood was equally divided among Dodger, Giant, and Yankee fans. The corner stores were the scenes of fierce and affectionate rivalries. The narrative begins in 1949 at the dawn of a glorious era in baseball. An era that saw one of the three New York teams competing in the World Series every year. An era when the lineups on most teams remained basically intact year after year, allowing fans to extend loyalty and love to their chosen teams. Knowing that for the most part, their favorite players would return the following year, exhibiting their familiar strengths, weaknesses, quirks, and habits. Never would there be a better time to be a Brooklyn Dodger fan. But in 1957 it all came to an abrupt end when the Dodgers (and the Giants) were forcibly uprooted from New York and transplanted to California. Shortly after the Dodgers left, Kearns' mother dies, and the family moved from the old neighborhood to an apartment on the other side of town. This move coincided with the move of several other families on the block and with the decline of the corner store as the supermarket began to take over. It was the end of an era and the beginning of another era--and for Kearns, the end of childhood.… (more)

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