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The well of lost plots : a novel (edition 2004)

by Jasper Fforde

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
6,402149602 (4.05)257
Member:spice_lover
Title:The well of lost plots : a novel
Authors:Jasper Fforde
Info:New York, N.Y. : Penguin Books, 2004.
Collections:Your library
Rating:*****
Tags:None

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The Well of Lost Plots by Jasper Fforde

  1. 70
    The Big Over Easy by Jasper Fforde (one-horse.library)
    one-horse.library: It's the novel Thurday was living in, while on the Character Exchange Program.
  2. 10
    The Official Catalog of the Library of Potential Literature by Ben Segal (bertilak)
  3. 10
    The City of Dreaming Books by Walter Moers (bell7)
    bell7: Similarly a zany tale with literary references and footnotes.
  4. 11
    Fables, Vol. 13: The Great Fables Crossover by Bill Willingham (one-horse.library)
  5. 00
    Libriomancer by Jim C. Hines (one-horse.library)
  6. 12
    Who's Afraid of Beowulf? by Tom Holt (Dr.Science)
    Dr.Science: The English author Tom Holt is relatively unknown in America, but very popular in England. If you enjoy Jasper Fforde or Christopher Moore you will most certainly enjoy Tom Holt's wry sense of English humor and the absurd. He has written a number of excellent books including Expecting Someone Taller, and Flying Dutch, but they may be difficult to find at your library or bookstore.… (more)
  7. 01
    Fables, Vol. 2: Animal Farm by Bill Willingham (one-horse.library)
  8. 01
    Fables, Vol. 1: Legends in Exile by Bill Willingham (one-horse.library)
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» See also 257 mentions

English (143)  French (3)  German (1)  Italian (1)  Dutch (1)  All languages (149)
Showing 1-5 of 143 (next | show all)
If I had come across this series about 20 years ago, I probably would have thought it was brilliant--a Prose Resource Operative (i.e., a detective in the world of books)? Sign me up! But I just couldn't get into this one. I read through to Chapter 6, and I wasn't seeing much in the way of character development or plot--just cleverness with the world and wordplay. So I had to let it go. Life is too short to read books that you don't look forward to picking up again. It might very well be somebody else's cup of tea, though. ( )
  Pat_F. | Jul 25, 2014 |
This episode in the Thursday Next series finds Thursday in the Well of Lost Plots as an apprentice JurisFiction agent under Miss Havisham. Thursday's husband, Landen Parke-Laine, is still eradicated, and Thursday needs a retreat from the Outland as she prepares for single motherhood (unless she can succeed in having Landen uneradicated). Thursday has to contend with Aornis Hades' attempts to erase her memories of Landen. The BookWorld is preparing for the launch of UltraWord, but this new book technology seems to have some hidden features that will change literature, and not in a good way. As agents begin to die under suspicious circumstances, it appears that someone is willing to murder in order to ensure UltraWord's success.

I was slightly disappointed with the second book in the series, so I was happy that this one is as good, if not better than, The Eyre Affair. I love all the silliness and literary jokes and puns. The discussion of the “had had and that that problem” is as funny as the classic “Who's on first?” routine. Reader Elizabeth Sastre's delivery couldn't have been better. Then there is the BookWorld award ceremony with categories like “Most Troubled Romantic Lead (Male)”. I read the first Nursery Crimes book, The Big Over Easy, last year, and I was surprised and delighted to discover that it's connected to this book. I love the world that Fforde has created and I'm always a little sad to leave it. ( )
  cbl_tn | Jul 22, 2014 |
All the literary characters in this tome, give me the urge to read some classics! ( )
  cougargirl1967 | Jul 2, 2014 |
Thursday Next's quest to recover her lost husband Landon Park Laine, continues. Still funny. ( )
  DinadansFriend | Apr 28, 2014 |
Jasper Fforde has done it again. I'm just delighted by this series of books. Elizabeth Sastre is a wonderful reader. She has a lovely British accent that enlivens the story. A great fully voiced production. This is a wonderful fun and silly world to explore. ( )
  njcur | Feb 13, 2014 |
Showing 1-5 of 143 (next | show all)
In Lost in a Good Book and The Well of Lost Plots, Fforde gets a bit bogged down in all the details of the fictional universe.
added by Katya0133 | editYale Review, David Galef (Oct 1, 2008)
 
Fforde's third novel featuring English sleuth Thursday Next is an interesting, enjoyable mix of detective story, fantasy, and literature.
added by Katya0133 | editSchool Library Journal, Ted Westervelt (Jun 1, 2004)
 
Like anchovies, Wagner, and Helmut Newton: will greatly appeal to people with unusual tastes--and befuddle everyone else.
added by Katya0133 | editKirkus Reviews (Feb 23, 2004)
 
Fforde has settled comfortably into series mode, producing another fun romp in an alternate universe where books are more real than reality.
added by Katya0133 | editLibrary Journal, Devon Thomas (Jan 15, 2004)
 
Fforde's sidesplitting sendup of an increasingly antibookish society is a sheer joy.
added by Katya0133 | editPublishers Weekly, Jeff Zaleski (Dec 15, 2003)
 

» Add other authors (6 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Jasper Ffordeprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Koen, ViktorCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Rostant, LarryCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Thomas, MarkCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Dedication
For Mari
who makes the torches burn brighter
First words
Making one's home in an unpublished novel wasn't without its compensations.
Quotations
...First there was OralTrad, upgraded ten thousand years later by the rhyming (for easier recall) OralTradPlus. For thousands of years this was the only Story Operating System and it is still in use today. The system branched in two about twenty thousand years ago ; on one side with CaveDaubPro) forerunner of PaintplusV2.3, GrecianUrnV1.2 SculptMarble V1.4 and the latest all encompassing SuperArtisticExpression-5). The other strand, the Picto-Phonetic Storytelling Systems, started with ClayTablet V2.1 and went through several competing systems (WaxTablet, Papyrus, VelliumPlus before merging into the award winning SCROLL, which was upgraded eight times to V3.3 before being swept aside by the all-new and clearly superior BOOK V1. Stable, easy to store and transport, compact and with a workable index, BOOK led the way for nearly eighteen hundred years...
'Good. Item seven. The had had and that that problem. Lady Cavendish, weren't you working on this?' // Lady Cavendish stood up and gathered her thoughts. // 'Indeed. The use of had had and that that has to be strictly controlled; they can interrupt the ImaginoTransference quite dramatically, causing readers to go back over the sentence in confusion, something we try to avoid.' // 'Go on.' // 'It's mostly an unlicensed usage problem. At the last count David Copperfield alone had had had had sixty-three times, all but then unapproved. Pilgrim's Progress may also be a problem owing to its had had / that that ratio.' // 'So what's the problem in Progress?' // 'That that had that that ten times but had had had had only thrice. Increased had had usage had had to be overlooked but not if the number exceeds that that that usage.' // 'Hmm,' said the Bellman. 'I thought had had had had TGC's approval for use in Dickens? What's the problem?' // 'Take the first had had and that that in the book by way of example,' explained Lady Cavendish. 'You would have thought that that first had had had had good occasion to be seen as had, had you not? Had had had approval but had had had not; equally it is true to say that that that that had had approval but that that other that that had not.' // 'So the problem with that other that that was that--?' // 'That that other-other that that had had approval.' // 'Okay,' said the Bellman, whose head was in danger of falling apart like a chocolate orange, 'let me get this straight: David Copperfield, unlike Pilgrim's Progress, which had had had, had had had had. Had had had had TGC's approval?' // There was a very long pause. // 'Right,' said the Bellman with a sigh. 'That's it for the moment...'
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Book description
Protecting the world's greatest literature—not to mention keeping up with Miss Havisham—is tiring work for an expectant mother. And Thursday can definitely use a respite. So what better hideaway than inside the unread and unreadable Caversham Heights, a cliché-ridden pulp mystery in the hidden depths of the Well of Lost Plots, where all unpublished books reside? But peace and quiet remain elusive for Thursday, who soon discovers that the Well itself is a veritable linguistic free-for-all, where grammasites run rampant, plot devices are hawked on the black market, and lousy books—like Caversham Heights—are scrapped for salvage. To top it off, a murderer is stalking Jurisfiction personnel and nobody is safe—least of all Thursday.
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0143034359, Paperback)

The third installment in Jasper Fforde’s New York Times bestselling series follows literary detective Thursday Next on another adventure in her alternate reality of literature-obsessed England

Jasper Fforde has done it again in this genre-bending blend of crime fiction, fantasy, and top-drawer literary entertainment. After two rollicking New York Times bestselling adventures through Western literature, resourceful BookWorld literary detective Thursday Next definitely needs some downtime. And what better place for a respite than in the hidden depths of the Well of Lost Plots, where all unpublished books reside? But peace and quiet remain elusive for Thursday, who soon discovers that the Well is a veritable linguistic free-for-all, where grammasites run rampant, plot devices are hawked on the black market, and lousy books—like the one she has taken up residence in—are scrapped for salvage. To make matters worse, a murderer is stalking the personnel of Jurisfiction and it’s up to Thursday to save the day. A brilliant feat of literary showmanship filled with wit, fantasy, and effervescent originality, this Ffordian tour de force will appeal to fans of Douglas Adams and P. G. Wodehouse. Thursday’s zany investigations continue with Something Rotten. Look for the five other bestselling Thursday Next novels, including One of Our Thursdays is Missing and Jasper Fforde’s latest bestseller, The Woman Who Died A Lot. Visit jasperfforde.com for a ffull window into the Ffordian world!

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:55:12 -0400)

(see all 7 descriptions)

Jasper Fforde has done it again in this genre-bending blend of crime fiction, fantasy, and top-drawer literary entertainment. After two rollicking New York Times bestselling adventures through Western literature, resourceful literary detective Thursday Next definitely needs some downtime. And what better place for a respite than in the hidden depths of the Well of Lost Plots, where all unpublished books reside? But peace and quiet remain elusive for Thursday, who soon discovers that the Well is a veritable linguistic free-for-all, where grammasites run rampant, plot devices are hawked on the black market, and lousy books-like the one she has taken up residence in-are scrapped for salvage. To make matters worse, a murderer is stalking the personnel of Jurisfiction and it's up to Thursday to save the day. A brilliant feat of literary showmanship filled with wit, fantasy, and effervescent originality, this Ffordian tour de force is the most exciting Thursday Next adventure yet.… (more)

(summary from another edition)

» see all 10 descriptions

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