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post office: A Novel by Charles Bukowski
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post office: A Novel (original 1971; edition 2007)

by Charles Bukowski

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3,806511,362 (3.95)58
Member:megaroo323
Title:post office: A Novel
Authors:Charles Bukowski
Info:Ecco (2007), Paperback, 208 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:**1/2
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Post Office by Charles Bukowski (1971)

  1. 00
    Under the Volcano by Malcolm Lowry (mArC0)
    mArC0: Self-destruction through alcohol and denial; Write what you know.
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English (46)  Dutch (2)  French (1)  German (1)  Italian (1)  All languages (51)
Showing 1-5 of 46 (next | show all)
In Post Office we find a lovable loser, an always autobiographical Bukowski dressed up thinly as a fictional man. He rarely does anything amazing, or faces external challenges which would inspire a reader to think "aha, interesting premise!" But what makes Bukowski so entertaining to generations of readers is his continual ability to look at the world with an eternal outsider's eye, and the ability to slip in an amazingly astute observation when you least expect. There's so much you could dislike, or henpeck about his writing, but it's overwhelmed easily by the unexpected brilliance, and won over just as the people he runs into are: by his wonderful charm. I'm being honest, this is a three-star book. But it's the best three star book you'll ever read. ( )
  wjmcomposer | Nov 5, 2014 |
In Post Office we find a lovable loser, an always autobiographical Bukowski dressed up thinly as a fictional man. He rarely does anything amazing, or faces external challenges which would inspire a reader to think "aha, interesting premise!" But what makes Bukowski so entertaining to generations of readers is his continual ability to look at the world with an eternal outsider's eye, and the ability to slip in an amazingly astute observation when you least expect. There's so much you could dislike, or henpeck about his writing, but it's overwhelmed easily by the unexpected brilliance, and won over just as the people he runs into are: by his wonderful charm. I'm being honest, this is a three-star book. But it's the best three star book you'll ever read. ( )
  wjmcomposer | Nov 5, 2014 |
A good summation of life and work. What you're willing to give up or put up with to earn a dollar. Even when you're self employed, you aren't really working for yourself but working to pay the mortgage company, the government etc. But working for yourself, you don't have to put up with some flunky supervisor accusing you of being inefficient or taking 10 minutes longer for your break than you were supposed to... Reading this book, needless to say, did not make me long for my days of working in offices. ( )
  viviennestrauss | Oct 11, 2014 |
Henry Chinaski is a heavy drinking, womanising, race track frequenting low-life, who works at the post office. The story follows his menial existence of twelve-hour night shifts, sorting post, delivering mail, observing his fellow colleagues and facing countless disciplinary measures, for offences such as missing work and refusing to follow protocol.

Chinaski’s free time consists of alcohol consumption, an infatuation with the horses and relationships, both casual and long term, with a succession of women, including Betty; a tragic, divorced alcoholic, as well as the nymphomaniac, parakeet owning, independently wealthy Joyce, and a war protesting hippy, a liaison that results in a daughter.

This, Bukowski’s first novel, is an autobiographical account of the period in his life prior to writing Post Office. His trademark visceral literary style and economy of the written word is in evidence throughout, as he adroitly describes the banality, hardship and dehumanisation of unskilled drudgery. Utilising a brutal, blunt and fast-paced narrative, replete with black humour, Post Office is at times sad and poignant.

Though Chinaski is a loathsome, repugnant creature, with a cynical outlook, vulgar and seedy habits, misogynistic attitudes, and an unrelenting craving for the most base urges, the reader is able to identify with him, due to his inherent humanness and unerring ability not to seek pity, in the face of what is ultimately a lonely and largely unrewarding existence. ( )
1 vote guyportman | Apr 7, 2014 |
Great for disgruntled employees everywhere. Is it any wonder that so many postal workers went nuts and started killing people? ( )
  ptdilloway | Nov 21, 2013 |
Showing 1-5 of 46 (next | show all)
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0061177571, Paperback)

"It began as a mistake." By middle age, Henry Chinaski has lost more than twelve years of his life to the U.S. Postal Service. In a world where his three true, bitter pleasures are women, booze, and racetrack betting, he somehow drags his hangover out of bed every dawn to lug waterlogged mailbags up mud-soaked mountains, outsmart vicious guard dogs, and pray to survive the day-to-day trials of sadistic bosses and certifiable coworkers. This classic 1971 novel—the one that catapulted its author to national fame—is the perfect introduction to the grimly hysterical world of legendary writer, poet, and Dirty Old Man Charles Bukowski and his fictional alter ego, Chinaski.

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:34:55 -0400)

(see all 2 descriptions)

By middle age, Henry Chinaski has lost more than twelve years of his life to the U.S. Postal Service. In a world where his three true, bitter pleasures are women, booze, and racetrack betting, he somehow drags his hangover out of bed every morning to lug waterlogged mailbags up mud-soaked mountains, outsmart vicious guard dogs, and pray to survive the day-to-day trials of sadistic bosses and certifiable co-workers.… (more)

(summary from another edition)

» see all 2 descriptions

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