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post office: A Novel by Charles Bukowski
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post office: A Novel (original 1971; edition 2007)

by Charles Bukowski

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4,019601,272 (3.95)66
Member:megaroo323
Title:post office: A Novel
Authors:Charles Bukowski
Info:Ecco (2007), Paperback, 208 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:**1/2
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Work details

Post Office by Charles Bukowski (1971)

  1. 20
    Bartleby, the Scrivener: A Story of Wall Street by Herman Melville (SCPeterson)
    SCPeterson: Melville's nightmare offers an existential take on dead-end office-work
  2. 00
    Under the Volcano by Malcolm Lowry (mArC0)
    mArC0: Self-destruction through alcohol and denial; Write what you know.
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Showing 1-5 of 53 (next | show all)
Short. Amusing. 4 stars. ( )
  HenryJOlsen | May 21, 2016 |
Another great read from Charles Bukowsiki, I love his raw style of writing, just puts it out there and tells Henry's story as it is doesnt' frill anything up. I read "Women" first so this told me a bit about what happened before that time in his life. ( )
  brandymuss | Mar 15, 2016 |
Life In A Post Office
I happened to read a wonderful quote by Bukowski, which eventually lead me to read his quasi-autobiographical novel, "Post Office". The protagonist in "Post Office" is Chinaski, who is considered as Bukowski's alter-ego. Chinaki's personality, which is sincere, miserable, and aloof is very likeable. For 12 years of his life he is stuck with an absurd, difficult, and low paying job of "Mail-deliveryman" and "Post-office sorter". He gets himself surrounded by vicious managers and annoying colleagues. Our miserable anti-hero, end up loathing everyone and everything. His only interest in life becomes women, (one fifth) whiskey, and racetrack betting. "Postman" is Chinaski's life-journey in this wretched times.
I felt the book very interesting because, I myself had applied for a postal job. There is nothing worse than the suffering of an intellectual, stuck in an absurd job, surrounded by idiotic people. The book is often funny because of the humourous portrayal of his misery and meaninglessness of life. Some portions are really funny.

"The midget was married to a very beautiful girl. When she was in her teens she got a coke bottle trapped in her p*ssy and had to go to a doctor to get it out, and, like in all small towns, the word got out about the coke bottle, the poor girl was shunned, and the midget was the only taker. He'd ended up with the best piece of ass in town."

Bukowski's "Postman" is an easy read. It's divided into numerous chapters, which makes it easier to read. I loved Chinaski and I could relate well with him, because now, I am also in a similar situation. The brutality and cruelty of life, sometimes make us laugh hard. Basically a poet, Bukowski write this début novel with real experience of his life. His sincerity and openness, along with numerous accolades and acclaim gives him the tag "Dirty Old Man". But, like our Chinaki, I don't think he would give a damn about it. Anyway, I liked Bukowski's attitude and writing, and I am looking forward to read his next novel "Ham on Rye". Charles Bukowski's "Postman" is a recommended, easy weekend read from me. 5 stars.
( )
  mahadevan.n.iyer | Mar 7, 2016 |
Set in the Beatnik era, Post Office is an almost autobiographical account of Bukowski's time spent working for the US postal service.

This is a window into the mundane, ordinary life of blue collar anti-hero Henry Chinaski. Chinaski is one of life's losers - a drinker with an aversion to authority and a general lack of commitment to anything. Despite himself, he can't help continually coming full circle back to his dead-end job at the postal sorting office.

Essentially this is an account of an ordinary life at a time when responsibilities mattered little and self-satisfaction was the priority. Not to be read with a feminist or politically correct head on (expect plenty of 'pussy' and 'tits' references), this is a book about a snapshot in time in Everydayville. You may not agree with many of Chinaski's ideals and turns of phrase, but it is a clever book of dark humour and cynicism against the System.

I enjoyed this much more than On the Road - if you enjoy Updike's Rabbit series this may be one for you.

4 stars - good fun, not to be taken too seriously. ( )
  AlisonY | Feb 16, 2016 |
Love this guy ( )
  jimifenway | Feb 2, 2016 |
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0061177571, Paperback)

"It began as a mistake." By middle age, Henry Chinaski has lost more than twelve years of his life to the U.S. Postal Service. In a world where his three true, bitter pleasures are women, booze, and racetrack betting, he somehow drags his hangover out of bed every dawn to lug waterlogged mailbags up mud-soaked mountains, outsmart vicious guard dogs, and pray to survive the day-to-day trials of sadistic bosses and certifiable coworkers. This classic 1971 novel—the one that catapulted its author to national fame—is the perfect introduction to the grimly hysterical world of legendary writer, poet, and Dirty Old Man Charles Bukowski and his fictional alter ego, Chinaski.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:12:35 -0400)

(see all 2 descriptions)

By middle age, Henry Chinaski has lost more than twelve years of his life to the U.S. Postal Service. In a world where his three true, bitter pleasures are women, booze, and racetrack betting, he somehow drags his hangover out of bed every morning to lug waterlogged mailbags up mud-soaked mountains, outsmart vicious guard dogs, and pray to survive the day-to-day trials of sadistic bosses and certifiable co-workers.… (more)

(summary from another edition)

» see all 2 descriptions

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