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Counting Crocodiles by Judy Sierra
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Counting Crocodiles

by Judy Sierra

Other authors: Will Hillenbrand (Illustrator)

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Showing 1-5 of 16 (next | show all)
A clever monkey gets what she wants by using math and counting! The book offers fun rhymes and entertaining consonant blends. I look for math books, but this one was just a fun good book! "Ten crocks dressed like Goldilocks" begins the count back down from the ten groups of crocodiles that have already been counted. Some students with good recall might love to say the croc types as you count back down while others might just enjoy the idea of crocs with pink mowhawks. Perhaps worth asking the students how the monkey would have gotten across the sea if she did not know how to count. All in all an entertaining read. ( )
  fsgiamba | May 5, 2019 |
Counting Crocodiles features a clever little monkey that tricks some crocodiles into helping her get to a banana tree across the sea and back again under the guise of counting the crocodiles. The little monkey counts the crocodiles (10 in all) first forwards and then backwards. ( )
  adrouet | Apr 17, 2019 |
One of the best counting books I've read. This story not only teaches counting to 10 but is filled with fun illustrations, silly rhymes, and funny animals that children are sure to love. A must read for children learning to count!

Update: I read this story to my class and they absolutely loved it and wanted to keep reading it. I bought my own copy so that we can read it whenever we're feeling silly and ready to count crocodiles! ( )
  tejennin | Apr 13, 2019 |
Young readers would really enjoy utilizing this book in a math lesson about counting. The silly illustrations of the animals and what they were doing will keep the children's attention and make the subject more fun, especially since many young children have a high interest in animals. The book included a lot of rhyming words which makes it a great book for shared or choral reading. In terms of the math aspect, it includes counting up to ten and back down to one. The rhyming words with counting creates a pattern-type reading, which would really assist an english language learner. Children can predict how many crocodiles will be on the next page, based on the pattern of numbers on the previous and current page. I would use this in a kindergarten or first grade math class. The beginning part of the story, where the setting is given and the monkey is introduced, is more difficult to follow and is very lengthy for the younger age groups. To focus on the important concept, I would skip this part of the story. I think this would ensure that the children would remain engaged for the duration of my reading. ( )
  bfeder1 | Oct 11, 2018 |
Great book for a math lesson in the earlier years. Poor Monkey. All she has to eat are sour lemons. One day she spies a banana tree on a faraway island, but the only way to get there is to navigate the crocodile-infested waters of the Sillabobble Sea. That’s no problem when you’re a brave and clever monkey who can count to ten and back! Age Range: 4 - 7 years Grade Level: Preschool - 3
  RosaJuarez | Apr 5, 2017 |
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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Judy Sierraprimary authorall editionscalculated
Hillenbrand, WillIllustratorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
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Book description
Poor Monkey. All she has to eat are sour lemons. One day she spies a banana tree on a faraway island, but the only way to get there is to navigate the crocodile-infested waters of the Sillabobble Sea. That’s no problem when you’re a brave and clever monkey who can count to ten and back!

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In this rhymed retelling of a traditional Asian tale, a clever monkey uses her ability to count to outwit the hungry crocodiles that stand between her and a banana tree on another island across the sea.
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Amazon.com Amazon.com Review (ISBN 0152163565, Paperback)

Counting Crocodiles may feel familiar to you, perhaps due to its folktale roots, maybe because Will Hillenbrand's artwork is so marvelously, comically, stylistically perfect, or perhaps because the delightful rhyme is so much like that of Lewis Carroll or Edward Lear. Here's a sample: "On an island in the middle of the Sillabobble Sea / lived a clever little monkey in a sour lemon tree. / She ate lemons boiled and fried, / steamed, sauteed, pureed, and dried. / She ate lemons till she cried, / 'I'm all puckered up inside!'" Meanwhile, Hillenbrand's full-page illustrations provide unending delights. In the first, most lemony of spreads, the snail is holding a whole lemon in her mouth, the fox has a glass of lemonade, and the lemon tree is laden with a blender, juicer, rolling pin, peeler, spatulas, and pans. The monkey looks suitably soured by the whole state of affairs.

On the second page, the monkey spies a banana tree on a similarly deserted island. Of course, she craves a few of these fine fruits. And she wonders aloud how many crocodiles there might be in the Sillabobble Sea. One crusty croc emerges to imply slyly that there are so many crocs that she could easily walk on their backs to the banana island, and invites her to count them. She counts them: "... one crocodile with a great big smile, / Two crocs resting on rocks, / Three crocs rocking in a box, / Four crocs building with blocks," and so on, until she counts "Ten crocs dressed like Goldilocks." Impatiently, the rascally reptiles ask her how many of them there are, she stalls, she counts them again, and lo and behold! in all the splashing and cavorting, the monkey (with the help of the fox and the snail) gets her bananas! This is one of the most delightful picture books around! (Ages 4 to 8)

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:02:42 -0400)

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In this rhymed retelling of a traditional Asian tale, a clever monkey uses her ability to count to outwit the hungry crocodiles that stand between her and a banana tree on another island across the sea.

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