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Killing Floor by Lee Child
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Killing Floor (original 1997; edition 1997)

by Lee Child

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
4,962174923 (3.83)240
Member:celfy
Title:Killing Floor
Authors:Lee Child
Info:Bantam (2010), Paperback, 528 pages
Collections:Kindle, Your library
Rating:****
Tags:Kindle

Work details

Killing Floor by Lee Child (1997)

  1. 21
    Rain fall by Barry Eisler (crazybatcow)
    crazybatcow: If you like how Reacher gets things done without worrying about niceties such as legality, you'll probably like Eisler's series too - though Eisler is a bit more descriptive and a bit less violent.
  2. 10
    Hit Man by Lawrence Block (crazybatcow)
    crazybatcow: Very similar main characters. Block's is a little less "gory" and is more like a series of vignettes than a plotted story.
  3. 21
    Promise Me by Harlan Coben (fleagirl)
    fleagirl: Big tough-guy with heart of tarnished gold, has knack for getting himself into trouble while getting others out.
  4. 00
    Japantown: A Thriller (A Jim Brodie Novel) by Barry Lancet (OneOfDem)
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» See also 240 mentions

English (171)  Dutch (2)  All languages (173)
Showing 1-5 of 171 (next | show all)
3.5 stars.
A great thriller, if excessively violent. The very choppy writing style keeps you moving forward and maintains a high degree of tension. ( )
  BookConcierge | Feb 11, 2016 |
2.5 stars. It was okay. Sort of fun. Completely and totally implausible. I would alllllmost pick up more in the series, except reviews say it's more of the same. Jack Reacher is an idealized James Bond, if you can imagine that, since James Bond himself is an idealized type of character. Jack Reacher is bigger, smarter, more bad-ass, and more independent than James Bond. He can win against any character in the mystery or thriller genre.

And that's my problem with this book/genre. The stakes don't feel like a problem for Jack Reacher, so I'm not invested in the story or the outcome. ( )
  Abby_Goldsmith | Feb 10, 2016 |
I haven't read this series in order, and with only 4 or so left to go, I finally read number 1. Because I have already read so many, I expected it to be just another Jack Reacher. I was wrong, this was really the best, at least for me. It certainly explains the endurance of the series when it started out like this! I listened to the audio version, and there was a really cool technique that I don't recall encountering before - the phone conversations actually sounded as though they were coming across a phone line. It was neat and I wish it was done more often. The other thing that I appreciated is that there was less of what I consider to be gratuitous violence than there is as the series goes on. I'm all for getting the bad guy, but in later entries he seems to make those decisions awfully quickly in some cases. Not about to stop me from continuing though - Jack is good entertainment. Now if I can just get the picture of Tom Cruise out of my mind..... ( )
  MaureenCean | Feb 2, 2016 |
This is a reread of a book.
The first book in the Jack Reacher series, introducing the character of an ex-army, former military policeman, who finds himself set free to explore the States after, literally, an entire lifetime in the army.
Reacher is accused, unjustly, of having killed someone. As a vagrant, he's apparently an easy target. They picked the wrong man.
A fast-moving thriller. ( )
  quiBee | Jan 21, 2016 |
The Killing Floor is my first Jack Reacher novel and my second book for the British Book Challenge in 2016. My husband has read all of the Reacher novels and enjoyed them so I thought, I’ll give it a whirl. I always liked Robert Ludlum and I enjoy Peter Robinson so….the writing style of Lee Child is a mix of the two.

After this first book I know I will continue reading the series. The plot has just enough suspense, gun play and detective work and observations to capture my interest. The Killing Floor, so named after the brutal way a team of bad guys go after their victims is….gruesome. It doesn’t go into serious detail about the killings so I was good with that. It’s the police procedural part that intrigues me. What took some getting used to were the short choppy sentences such as:

I picked up my mug. The coffee was cold. I looked at the waitress and nodded toward my cup.

The entire book isn’t made up of these choppy sentences but there are many in there. They set the scene then the storyline evolves at a good enough rate to keep me reading. Now, after the rich detail in Tana French’s Dublin detective squad mysteries, this may seem low brow. But honestly, if you like a mystery and a bit of action, Lee Child gets captures all of it with his Jack Reacher novels.

Movie vs. Book

When the first Jack Reacher movie came out on DVD we watched it. My husband was not pleased by Tom Cruise playing the part of Reacher. I had not read the books yet so had no point of reference. Allow me to share the differences: Cruise is dark haired and 5’9” and sullen in the movie. Lee Child describes Reacher as a massive 6’6”, broad shouldered and fair haired. So now I know what caused the frown when the movie starred Tom Cruise. Chris Helmsworth would have worked. Big guy with broad chest, blonde……that works.

This is book 2 in my British Book Challenge. ( )
  SquirrelHead | Jan 19, 2016 |
Showing 1-5 of 171 (next | show all)
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Lee Childprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Hill, DickNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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I was arrested in Eno's Diner.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Book description
Jack Reacher loses his brother in this book.
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Amazon.com Amazon.com Review (ISBN 0515141429, Mass Market Paperback)

When Jack Reacher suddenly decides to ask a Greyhound bus driver to let him off near the town of Margrave, Georgia, he thinks it's because his brother once mentioned that the famed blues guitarist Blind Blake died there. But it doesn't take long for the footloose ex-military policeman to discover that there are plenty of strange--and very dangerous--things going on behind Margrave's manicured lawns and clean streets that demand his attention. This first thriller by a former television writer features some of the best-written scenes of action in recent memory, a crash course in currency and counterfeiting, and a hero who is just begging to be called on for an encore.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:09:15 -0400)

(see all 5 descriptions)

Jack Reacher, an ex-military policeman passes through the town of Margrave, Georgia and is accused of murder. He must find the true killer and prove his innocence--with virtually the whole town against him.

(summary from another edition)

» see all 16 descriptions

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