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The Girl in the Red Coat by Roma Ligocka
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The Girl in the Red Coat

by Roma Ligocka

Other authors: Iris von Finckenstein (Author)

Other authors: See the other authors section.

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Showing 4 of 4
This really should be a 3 star plus rating, but I really didn't love it. I think I heard too many good things about it before I read it, so I was a little disappointed.

I liked the character, and really liked the fact that you saw her journey through life, as compared to most books of this sort that kind of end right after the war. She comes into her own as an adult, and deals with things as a survivor of the war, which we get to see.

The writing about her being in the war, as a tiny child were very hard to take. Most of these things are hard to imagine and read about, but I think the fact that I was seeing through the eyes of a child made it so much more heartwrenching.

All in all, I'm glad I read the book, and I would be curious to know what happens after the story ends. ( )
  E.J | Apr 3, 2013 |
As a witness and survivor of the Shoah, Roma Ligocka's biography is not my first choice in providing a true picture of having endured that hell. I remember watching Steven Spielberg's Schindler's List and the little girl in the red coat stood out wandering alone and overlooked by the Nazi troops.It was a compelling picture! When I saw the title of this memoir I knew I had to read it. However, her childhood memories appear too perfect, too knowing, too detailed for a child of such a tender age. For me, this level of recall for a child felt contrived and detracted from a testimony that needs to be heard again and again. Roma's life is revealed to us from the Krakow ghetto, through Comunist Poland and eventually to becoming a wife, mother and struggling artist. All in all this 'novel' like memoir is a worth the time to read but it is not the most compelling testimony available. There is a degree of vanity and self centeredness that is out of place in such a harrowing time. A much better memoir would be found in Eli Wiesel's Night or Dawn or in Ann Ornstein's My Mother's Eyes: Holocaust Memories of a Young Girl. ( )
1 vote tobiejonzarelli | Apr 6, 2009 |
It would really be misleading to call this a Holocaust memoir. Roma Ligocka does write about the Holocaust, but she was a very young child during that time and her vague, fragmentary memories of it take up only a few chapters of the book. The rest of the book is about her growing up and her adulthood as an artist. I didn't find the book all that interesting, and I thought Roma liked to promote herself a lot, talking about how beautiful she was, etc. Interesting detail: Roma's cousin is the famous film director Roman Polanski, and he's one of the major characters in the early part of the book. ( )
  meggyweg | Mar 23, 2009 |
Sadly, I was not touched by this book. ( )
  readerspeak | Aug 2, 2007 |
Showing 4 of 4
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» Add other authors (6 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Ligocka, RomaAuthorprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Finckenstein, Iris vonAuthorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Büdinger, PatriciaDesignersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Ellingmann, F.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Keller, MichaelCover designersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Strub, ChristinePhotographersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Für meinen Sohn Jakob
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Wie ein riesiges, weisses Schiff thront das Hotel Negresco über der Promenade des Anglais an der Côte d'Azur in Nizza.
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 038533740X, Paperback)

As a child in German-occupied Poland, Roma Ligocka was known for the bright strawberry-red coat she wore against a tide of gathering darkness. Fifty years later, Roma, an artist living in Germany, attended a screening of Steven Spielberg’s Schindler’s List, and instantly knew that “the girl in the red coat”—the only splash of color in the film—was her. Thus began a harrowing journey into the past, as Roma Ligocka sought to reclaim her life and put together the pieces of a shattered childhood.

The result is this remarkable memoir, a fifty-year chronicle of survival and its aftermath. With brutal honesty, Ligocka recollects a childhood at the heart of evil: the flashing black boots, the sudden executions, her mother weeping, her father vanished…then her own harrowing escape and the strange twists of fate that allowed her to live on into the haunted years after the war. Powerful, lyrical, and unique among Holocaust memoirs, The Girl in the Red Coat eloquently explores the power of evil to twist our lives long after we have survived it. It is a story for anyone who has ever known the darkness of an unbearable past—and searched for the courage to move forward into the light.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:07:05 -0400)

(see all 3 descriptions)

The woman whose life inspired the character of the red-clad child in "Schindler's List" recounts her harrowing childhood under the Nazis and in Communist Poland to her career in the theater and film.

» see all 2 descriptions

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