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The Rabbi's Cat 2 by Joann Sfar
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    Tintin in the Congo by Hergé (alaskayo)
    alaskayo: The final story in the Rabbi's Cat has Tintin making a cameo while on his 'Tintin in the Congo' adventure. He's the fellow acting the white colonialist, barreling his way through the forest murdering everything in good cheer. The bizarre origins for his actions lie here.… (more)
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    Pillar of Salt by Albert Memmi (Eustrabirbeonne)
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    Contre-prêches by Abdelwahab Meddeb (Eustrabirbeonne)
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Showing 1-5 of 6 (next | show all)
Joann Sfar is a wonderful graphic novelist and the best books I've read of his are the Rabbis Cat and this sequel, not-overly-creatively named Rabbi's Cat 2. It is set in a Jewish community in what I believe is French Algeria in what I believe is the 1920s. It describes the intersection of different cultures and religions, from Judaism to Islam, tradition to modernity, Europe to Africa, etc., with a sympathetic and insightful eye. The imagery is beautiful. And the cat featured in the title is the best character of all. ( )
  nosajeel | Jun 21, 2014 |
http://nwhyte.livejournal.com/2243568.html

A compilation of two albums telling two quite different stories. The first, "Heaven on Earth", is a bit of a meditation on stories and telling them through the mysterious figure of Malka, the Rabbi's cousin whose companion is an aging lion, set against the real background of the rise of an anti-Semitic regime in Algiers in the mid-1930s. In the second, "Africa's Jerusalem", the Rabbi, his cat and friends set off to explore their continent, taking an improbably indirect route from Algiers to Ethiopia which brings them into contact with another icon of bande dessinée who happened to be in the neighbourhood, ie Tintin.

I read this in English translation, which was just as well as the second volume also features a lost Russian character (who is able to talk to the cat) and I might not have got the linguistic nuances in the original French.

Sfar says in his introduction to the second album that he was trying to write about racism. I'm not sure that he quite managed to address colonialism or race - there are various scenes of the urbanised rabbi and friends (and cat) dealing with tribes which seemed a bit cliched - but he did at least widen his canvas. ( )
  nwhyte | Feb 2, 2014 |
The talking cat with the big ears who offers insightful commentary on his rabbi master and life in Algeria in the early 20th century is back. The rabbi's daughter is fighting with her husband (also a rabbi), and the cat is quite happy with that. It means more snuggles from his mistress, Zlabya. Of course, the talking cat also has a couple of adventures. First he and a snake tag along with the famous Malka and his lion on a trek around the desert. Then, a stowaway Russian Jew shows up in Zlabya's house, and he understands the cat! Soon a rag-tag bunch are off looking for the mysterious lost city of Jerusalem. We thus get to see a lot of Africa through the cat's eyes.

I have to say, I didn't enjoy this sequel quiiite as much as the original. I suspect that the fact that I was less familiar with the topics the cat is offering snarky commentary on had something to do with this. I really don't know much about Northern Africa or the "lost city of Jerusalem," so I'm sure I missed some of the inside jokes. Whereas the previous book was mostly about Jews in Algeria and the French occupation, this book seems to talk a lot more about the relative merits of the various monotheistic religions and why can't we all just be friends. The cat has learned to hold his tongue a bit, which is something I don't like as much. I have the feeling a talking cat wouldn't ever do that. Haha.

Overall, this is an interesting look at the intersection of many cultures, religions, and races on the continent of Africa through the unique eyes of a rabbi's cat, a wandering lion, and a friendly snake. If you enjoyed the first book, you shouldn't skip this one.

Check out my full review: http://wp.me/pp7vL-JX (Link will be live on March 5, 2012). ( )
1 vote gaialover | Mar 2, 2012 |
Joann Sfar is a wonderful graphic novelist and the best books I've read of his are the Rabbis Cat and this sequel, not-overly-creatively named Rabbi's Cat 2. It is set in a Jewish community in what I believe is French Algeria in what I believe is the 1920s. It describes the intersection of different cultures and religions, from Judaism to Islam, tradition to modernity, Europe to Africa, etc., with a sympathetic and insightful eye. The imagery is beautiful. And the cat featured in the title is the best character of all. ( )
  jasonlf | May 22, 2011 |
I may be in the minority here, but I actually liked this volume better than the first one. The cat isn't quite as snarky and funny as he is in the first volume (even though he manages to take a few stabs at the ignorant humans), and that's a bit of a shame. However, the topics in this one move the philosophical ponderings from the private world to the communal world and I really enjoyed that shift. Also, the mythological elements (Malka's stories and the search for the Ethiopian Jersualem) made the stories much more universal. This volume contains the two stories Le Paradis Terrestre and Jérusalem d'Afrique. ( )
  -Eva- | May 13, 2009 |
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The Rabbi's Cat 2 collects the fourth and fifth books in the series, originally published in France. Please do not combine with Le Chat du Rabbin, tome 2 : Le Malka des Lions, which is the second book in the series.
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0375425071, Hardcover)

Joann Sfar's beloved, humorous, and wise talking cat is back for more beautifully illustrated adventures in Algiers and across Africa in the 1930s. While the rabbi is away, his cat tags along with Malka of the Lions (the rabbi's enigmatic cousin), who roams the desert with his ferocious-on-demand lion. Some believe Malka to be a pious Jew, others think he's a shrewd womanizer, but the cat will be the one to discover the surprising truth.

Back in Algiers, the rabbi's daughter, Zlabya, and her new husband fill the house with their fighting, while the city around them fills with a rising tide of anti-Semitism. On a whim, the rabbi's cat, the rabbi, a sheikh (also a cousin of the rabbi), and a very misplaced Russian painter set out on a fantastic journey (even encountering a young reporter named Tintin in the Congo) in search of an African Jerusalem. It turns out to be very fortuitous that the rabbi's cat is not just a talking cat, but a multilingual talking cat.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:09:26 -0400)

"Joann Sfar's beloved, humorous, and wise talking cat is back for more beautifully illustrated adventures in Algiers and across Africa in the 1930s. While the rabbi is away, his cat tags along with Malka of the Lions (the rabbi's enigmatic cousin), who roams the desert with his ferocious-on-demand lion. Some believe Malka to be a pious Jew, others think he's a shrewd womanizer, but the cat will be the one to discover the surprising truth." "Back in Algiers, the rabbi's daughter, Zlabya, and her new husband fill the house with their fighting, while the city around them fills with a rising tide of anti-Semitism. On a whim, the rabbi's cat, the rabbi, a sheik (also a cousin of the rabbi), and a very misplaced Russian painter set out on a fantastic journey (even encountering a young reporter named Tintin in the Congo) in search of an African Jerusalem. It turns out to be very fortuitous that the rabbi's cat is not just a talking cat, but a multilingual talking cat"--BOOK JACKET.… (more)

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