HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

The Patron Saint of Plagues by Barth…
Loading...

The Patron Saint of Plagues

by Barth Anderson

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
131891,855 (3.47)13

None.

Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 13 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 8 (next | show all)
I have to admit I was a little overwhelmed with this book initially. There is a lot to take in, and the author jumps right into it, so I was scrambling a bit to wrap my head around everything that was going on. Mexico is a new super power, and Mexico City (now called Ascension) is the most populous city on the planet. They are a technological marvel, and all their citizens are connected through brain implantations (called wetware) that functions as a pseudo-mental wifi. There is a political power struggle between to religious faction; The Holy Renaissance who are very similar to Catholics, and a rogue religious group led by Sister Domenica, the Patron Saint of Plagues.

Oh, and then there is the disease outbreak, of course. An American named Stark is tasked with combating an extreme Dengue outbreak that is spreading and killing so quickly that it simply can NOT be a natural outbreak. Unfortunately for him, solving this mystery isn't easy when he's caught between 2 bickering factions in a country where he wouldn't be welcome in the first place.

The characters seemed a little inconsistent, and Stark has this way of speaking that is grating and totally obnoxious. Note to future novelists: Don't make your main character grating and obnoxious. The plot also seemed a bit too far-reaching, which kind of killed the mystery aspect of the novel for me. It just didn't quite hook me, and during the big reveal I was mostly just nodding and thinking "well, alright then..." Which pretty much sums up how I feel about the novel as a whole. ( )
  Ape | Jan 24, 2014 |
Excellent thriller with very vivid imagery. Loved the play on Mexican history/religiosity that's intertwined with the science fiction. Incredible that it's a debut novel (it's that good). Looking forward to future works by the author. ( )
  AramisSciant | May 17, 2011 |
Honestly, I skipped to the end of this book, something I rarely do. I liked the idea of the story, just not the execution of it. I also admit not being a huge fan of sci-fi. For some reason, I didn't realize this book fell into that genre. Oh well! ( )
  nevusmom | Oct 25, 2010 |
An excellent first novel. Some nicely plotted science mixed with enough cyberpunk/future-tech to avoid a lot of potential pit-falls.

There is a mix of this with some politics and religion that gives a plausible and fascinating future in which the USA is no longer a superpower, but Mexico is a superpower of the information age, as well as a fascist and religious police state.

The only reason this isn't getting the whole five stars? The lead character is rather mutable, or perhaps reveals too many layers on the way through to quite work for me, and he has an annoying "futurespeak" pattern where he doesn't bother with any parts of the verb "to be" but only when he's speaking English... ( )
  lewispike | Feb 21, 2009 |
Plague fiction set in the year 2061, mostly in the city of Ascension, Mexico (once Mexico City.) It’s a vastly different world than we know today. Mexico and the US are at war, with Mexico being headed by a religious group, an offshoot of the Catholic church that rules with a fascist furor. And someone has unleashed a deadly plague in the city, a combination of a couple of different plagues and set to attack only those with a certain genetic background and who are connected to the pilone network—basically ‘internet in your head’ so that the government can keep track of everyone. The main character is a scientist known as ‘the Patron Saint of Plagues’ who is summoned by the Mexican government to help them get this plague under control, and yet they won’t give Stark the vital information he needs, so he must accumulate that knowledge by other means. Ironically, a renegade nun named Sister Domenica, who predicted the plague, is also referred to by the same title, and inevitably Stark and Domenica’s paths do eventually cross. An interesting book, with what seemed to be a plausible storyline, with one major annoyance—that the main character spoke in a shorthand type language that drove me mad! ( )
  Spuddie | Oct 3, 2008 |
Showing 1-5 of 8 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

Book description
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0553383582, Paperback)

In this biological thriller of the near future, postinsurrection Mexico has undermined the superpower of the United States. But while the rivals battle over borders, a pestilence beyond politics threatens to explode into a worldwide epidemic. . . .

Since the rise of the Holy Renaissance, Ascension—once known as Mexico City—has become the most populous city in the world, its citizens linked to a central government net through wetware implanted in their brains. But while their dictator grows fat with success, the masses are captivated by Sister Domenica, an insurgent nun whose weekly pirate broadcasts prophesy a wave of death. All too soon, Domenica’s nightmarish prediction proves true, and Ascension’s hospitals are overrun with victims of a deadly fever. As the rampant plague kills too quickly to be contained, Mexico smuggles its last hope over the violently contested border. . . .

Henry David Stark is a crack virus hunter for the American Center for Disease Control and a veteran of global humanitarian efforts. But this disease is unlike any he’s seen before—and there seems to be no way to cure or control it. Racing against time, Stark battles corruption to uncover a horrifying truth: this is no ordinary outbreak but a deliberately unleashed man-made virus . . . and the killer is someone Stark knows.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:09:20 -0400)

(see all 2 descriptions)

"Since the rise of the Holy Renaissance, Ascension - once known as Mexico City - has become the most populous city in the world, its citizens linked to a central government net through wetware implanted in their brains. But while their dictator grows fat with success, the masses are captivated by Sister Domenica, an insurgent nun whose weekly pirate broadcasts prophesy a wave of death. All too soon, Domenica's nightmarish prediction proves true, and Ascension's hospitals are overrun with victims of a deadly fever. As the rampant plague kills too quickly to be contained, Mexico smuggles its last hope over the violently contested border ..." "Henry David Stark is a crack virus hunter for the American Center for Disease Control and a veteran of global humanitarian efforts. But this disease is unlike any he's seen before - and there seems to be no way to cure or control it. Racing against time, Stark battles corruption to uncover a horrifying truth: this is no ordinary outbreak but a deliberately unleashed man-made virus ... and the killer is someone Stark knows."--BOOK JACKET.… (more)

Quick Links

Swap Ebooks Audio
2 wanted

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.47)
0.5
1
1.5
2 4
2.5 1
3 7
3.5 5
4 10
4.5 3
5 1

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 120,000,452 books! | Top bar: Always visible