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Mindset: The New Psychology of Success by…
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Mindset: The New Psychology of Success

by Carol Dweck

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925289,453 (3.93)11
  1. 20
    Outliers: The Story of Success by Malcolm Gladwell (peter_vandenbrande)
    peter_vandenbrande: Beide auteurs benadrukken dat je talent moet ontwikkelen om succesvol te worden. Ze ondergraven allebei de mythe dat alleen geniale mensen de top kunnen bereiken. Carol Dweck werkt het hoe en waarom van deze "growth mindset" uit, Malcolm Gladwell nuanceert tegelijk de invloed van deze individuele inspanningen door "toeval" in het verhaal te brengen: hoe omstandigheden en toevallige kansen van invloed zijn op uiteindelijk succes.… (more)
  2. 10
    How Children Succeed: Grit, Curiosity, and the Hidden Power of Character by Paul Tough (bluenotebookonline)
    bluenotebookonline: Tough goes broad on a range of non-cognitive factors that influence the likelihood that students will be successful (grit, perseverance, curiosity, etc.); Dweck goes deep on one factor (having a growth mindset rather than a fixed mindset). Both are highly readable (though FWIW, I found Dweck repetitive and preferred Tough's book).… (more)
  3. 10
    Why Don't Students Like School: A Cognitive Scientist Answers Questions About How the Mind Works and What It Means for the Classroom by Daniel T. Willingham (bluenotebookonline)
    bluenotebookonline: Very readable book on cognitive science as it applies to teaching and learning. One chapter features the growth mindset, and the others are fabulous as well.
  4. 00
    Thanks for the Feedback: The Science and Art of Receiving Feedback Well by Douglas Stone (peter_vandenbrande)
    peter_vandenbrande: Stone gaat voort op de growth-mindset van Dweck door in te gaan op het groeipotentieel van feedback voor de ontvanger. Hij benoemt de klassieke frustraties en vooroordelen op feedback en belicht een hoop strategieën om feedback in je eigen voordeel te benutten.… (more)
  5. 00
    Brain Rules: 12 Principles for Surviving and Thriving at Work, Home, and School by John Medina (montano)
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Showing 1-5 of 27 (next | show all)
This book came highly recommended from my cohorts in the volleyball coaching community. Their recommendations made me curious, as the book was published in 2011 and I a have had some time to look over the reviews and other materials that have been written since that time. The author, Carol Dweck, has had a TED talk released, a number of others, including Maria Popova of Brainpickings have written about the ideas contained within the book.

So it is that I approached this book with great anticipation. It did not quite meet the anticipation, but it was close enough. The book was written with a mixed audience in mind. Dweck had individual chapters dedicated to the business reader, the parent, the educator, the coach, and the lovelorn. These chapters were very well meaning, customizing her idea, and there is one salient and powerful idea, to the different possible areas of interest that may benefit from her idea. The success of those chapters however, were mixed.

The central idea is this: there are two distinct ways for people to view themselves and their place in the world, fixed and growth mindsets. The fixed mindset is basically the mindset that is result oriented, one that believes that each person has been born with a set amount of talent, intelligence, and ability, furthermore, that those initial conditions can never be improved upon. What you see if what you get.

The growth mindset people, however believe that their minds, their intelligence, their talents can be changed and improved. Indeed, they believe that their mindset can be improved. According to Dweck, this difference in perspective drives and defines the psyche and the behaviour of everyone. Even though she is very adamant about the veracity of this dichotomy, Dweck is also quite realistic in recognizing that people will take different tack with different portions of their lives, they are able to differentiate the different portions of their lives.

The first three chapters define the conversation that the author has with us. Those three chapters sets the tone for the rest of the book. She then goes into detail about the mindset difference as it manifests itself in: business, sports, relationships parenting, teaching and coaching,and finally she goes into the concluding chapter on how does no go about teaching these mindsets and more importantly, change the mindsets.

As with most psychological texts, the book is full of anecdotal stories, all selected and written with the intention of making the author's point. While these tales are interesting, and the author does a brilliant job of making her point, there was an overabundance of stories. The problem is that once the reader is quite convinced by the author's argument, some of the stories become too superficial and become an obstacle to the never level of reading. There really isn't much the author can do about that however, it just made the reading challenging.

I felt that the education angle was the most well fleshed out and thought out portion of the myriad of arguments. It is obvious that the author is well versed in the education milieu, as she is a researcher at Stanford University in the psychology department. I felt that the relationship chapter was a bit superficial, while also interesting. I felt the parenting portion was the most difficult to read because the subject is so fraught with emotions. Indeed the stories in the parental portion were by far the most gut wrenching.

I felt that sports chapter was interesting if unsatisfying. The examples that the author chose for fixed mindset and growth mindset athletes were well chosen, although I felt that McEnroe was too easy of a target. He was also kind of a counterexample in a way since he saw great successes as a tennis player. The author's choices for example in coaching was also pretty obvious, although the example of Bob Knight was intriguing, I wish that she could have delved further into the dichotomy of his coaching and his reaction to his coaching.

Finally, I thought the business chapter was the strongest out of all the chapters, even though I felt that using Jack Welch as an example of growth mindset was a mistake. Welch, and his championing of forced ranking in the GE organization exemplifies the fixed mindset, even though, as the author documented, his approach to the other parts of the organization exemplified the growth mindset. I would like to have seen the author address the forced ranking issue.

Regardless of the various peaks and valleys in the presentation of the idea, I thought this was a valuable book for myself, it certainly made me think harder about how I approached my own views.

One thing that the author did not do, which I appreciated, is to give formulaic recipe type of advice to the reader, this is in line with my own personal feeling that there are no simple ways to implement this very large very complex concept. It is far more valuable for the reader to ruminate deeply and re-read the entire book just to get the whole picture in the shape that will meet their personally need. ( )
  pw0327 | Jul 18, 2015 |
World-renowned Stanford University psychologist Carol Dweck, in decades of research on achievement and success, has discovered a truly groundbreaking idea-the power of our mindset.

Dweck explains why it's not just our abilities and talent that bring us success-but whether we approach them with a fixed or growth mindset. She makes clear why praising intelligence and ability doesn't foster self-esteem and lead to accomplishment, but may actually jeopardize success. With the right mindset, we can motivate our kids and help them to raise their grades, as well as reach our own goals-personal and professional. Dweck reveals what all great parents, teachers, CEOs, and athletes already know: how a simple idea about the brain can create a love of learning and a resilience that is the basis of great accomplishment in every area.
  COREEducation | Apr 27, 2015 |
Certaily one of the most important books I'v read this year. Highly recommended. ( )
  KonradN | Apr 19, 2015 |
This is a great book that breaks down and compares the two different mind sets in our world: the fixed and growth. This book compares and contrasts those two different mind sets and gives information about why and how we think.
  kelly.haskins | Apr 9, 2015 |
You know what this is. Another leadership book. Change your mindset. To this one. ( )
  debnance | Mar 21, 2015 |
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0345472322, Paperback)

World-renowned Stanford University psychologist Carol Dweck, in decades of research on achievement and success, has discovered a truly groundbreaking idea–the power of our mindset.

Dweck explains why it’s not just our abilities and talent that bring us success–but whether we approach them with a fixed or growth mindset. She makes clear why praising intelligence and ability doesn’t foster self-esteem and lead to accomplishment, but may actually jeopardize success. With the right mindset, we can motivate our kids and help them to raise their grades, as well as reach our own goals–personal and professional. Dweck reveals what all great parents, teachers, CEOs, and athletes already know: how a simple idea about the brain can create a love of learning and a resilience that is the basis of great accomplishment in every area.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:09:44 -0400)

Reveals how established attitudes affect all aspects of one's life, explains the differences between fixed and growth mindsets, and stresses the need to be open to change in order to achieve fulfillment and success.

» see all 3 descriptions

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